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Articles by M.M. Tahat
Total Records ( 5 ) for M.M. Tahat
  M.M. Tahat , S. Kamaruzaman , O. Radziah , J. Kadir and H.N. Masdek
  The ability of endomycorrhizal fungi to colonize tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum. Mill) roots, was studied under glasshouse conditions. Two indigenous species; Glomus mosseae and Scutellospora sp. and non-indigenous species Gigaspora margarita were used in the study. Pot culture technique was used for re-culturing G. mosseae and Scutellospora sp., sorghum was used as a trap host. Gigaspora margarita was re-cultured by test tube technique. All species had the ability to colonize tomato root with different colonization levels. Significantly higher root were colonized by G. mosseae (80%) compared to G. margarita (20%). A G. mosseae significantly increased shoot dry weight (2.82 g) and flowers number (32.75 g) and root growth. Tomato plants treated by G. mosseae were higher significantly after seven week of plant growth. The colonization of tomato root by G. mosseae lead to bigger root size and more branching which increase positively the number of root tips, length, surface area and root volume. Higher spores (455/100 g) were counted in Glomus mosseae inoculated plant compared to Scutellospora sp. (250/100 g) and G. margarita plant (132/100 g).
  M.M. Tahat , S. Kamaruzaman , O. Radziah , J. Kadir and H.N. Masdek
  The study aimed to select plant host for multiplication of Glomus mosseae spores. Five plant species were used [(corn, (Zea mays) sorghum, (Sorghum bicolor) lentil, (Lens culinaris), barley, (Hordeum vulgare) and green bean, (Phaseolus vulgaris)]. Plants were inoculated with Glomus mosseae and grown for 75 days under glasshouse conditions. Mycorrhizal sporulation and colonization of all plant hosts were assessed at different sampling periods. At 75 days of growth the highest number of Glomus mosseae spores was found in mycorrhizosphere of corn plant (167 spore/10 g soil), while the lowest in the mycorrhizosphere of barley (35 spore/10 g soil). The highest percentage of root colonization was in corn (76%), while the lowest colonization was found in green bean (24%). Corn was the most suitable host for spore production of Glomus mosseae and to extensive root colonization. It was recorded that plants having more colonization percentage were able to produce more Glomus mosseae spores. The study indicated that different plant species significantly influenced the root spore production and root colonization percentage of Glomus mosseae.
  M.M. Tahat , K. Sijam and R. Othman
  An in vitro experiment was conducted to study the effect of different plant root exudates on germination of Glomus mosseae and the growth of bacterial wilt Ralstonia solanacearum. Mycorrhizal spore germination increased when the volume of Mycorrhizal Tomato Root Exudates (MTRE) increased and in contrast, a negative relationship was recorded when the volume of Non-Mycorrhizal Tomato Root Exudates (NMTRE) increased. Similarly, the Mycorrhizal Corn Root Exudates (MCRE) was able to increase the percentage of germinated spores as compared to the Non-Mycorrhizal Corn Root Exudates (NMCRE). The antagonistic effect between Ralstonia solanacearum and Glomus mosseae was also studied in this research. There was no inhibition effect of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal tomato and corn root exudates on growth of R. solanacearum. The study indicated that Glomus mosseae spore germination could be influenced by the host plant or pH medium.
  M.M. Tahat , O. Radziah , S. Kamaruzaman , J. Kadir and N.H. Masdek
  A pot study was aimed to investigate the role of tomato in determining differential response to bacterial wilt causal agent Ralstonia solanacearum pathogen and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Glomus mosseae. Disease severity was measured after 10, 20 and 30 days of plant growth. The pathogen and dual treatment (R. solanacearum with G. mosseae) were not significantly different at the end of this experiment. Soil pH was greatly influencing the pathogen and AMF microbe. Glomus mosseae mycorrhizosphere was more alkaline (pH 5.9) compared to the pathogen mycorrhizosphere (pH 4.9). The concentration of bacterial cell in the R. solancearum soil was not different from the dual treatment after 60 days of plant growth. Spore germination was influenced by the interaction between the soil pathogen and AMF. Spores number in the dual treatment at 60 days was less than the original number added. Root colonization percentage in G. mosseae (61%) was significantly more than the dual treatment (16%). This provide an evidence about the role of plant host in increasing the spores germination influenced by many substances produced by the host root (root exudates). The results demonstrated that the role of plant in determination the relationship between soil-borne pathogen and antagonistic microbe was critical.
  M.M. Tahat , Kamaruzaman , Sijam and R. Othman
  Arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF) are the symbiotic fungi that predominate in the roots and soils of agricultural crop plants. The AMF form beneficial symbioses in most terrestrial ecosystems and crop production systems. Ninty percent of land plant species are colonized by one or more of the mycorrhizal fungi species ranging from flowering to non flowering plants, while only a few plant families do not form this association. The relationship between mycorrhiza and plant is very widely spread among terrestrial vascular plants. The AMF must have a host to complete its life cycle and this association has been found to be mutually beneficial; thus, the fungus assists the plant in mineral nutrients uptake, while the plant supplies the fungus with carbon as a result of this relation. The negative-antagonistic interaction of AMF with various soilborne plant pathogens is the reason for their use as a bio-control agents. Many workers have observed an antagonistic effect of AMF against some fungal pathogens.
 
 
 
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