Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by M.H. Idris
Total Records ( 8 ) for M.H. Idris
  H. Hamli , M.H. Idris , M.K. Abu Hena and S.K. Wong
  The diversity of edible bivalve was conducted from August 2010 to July 2011 covering eight divisions i.e., Kuching, Sarikei, Sibu, Mukah, Bintulu, Miri, Limbang and Lawas of Sarawak, Malaysia. Samples were collected from native market and fishing village during the study period. All edible bivalves inhabit either in brackish or marine environment and comprised 19 species from 10 families namely Meretrix meretrix, M. lyrata, Paphia undulata, Circe scripta, Solen regularies, Solen lamarckii, Pharella acutidens, Amusium pleuronectes, Anadara granosa, Pholas orientalis, Gluconome virens, Placuna placenta, Crassotrea lugubris, Isognomon ephippium, Polymesoda erosa, P. bengalensis, P. expansa, Anadonta woodina and Pilsbryoconcha exilis. The diversity of edible bivalves was found highest in Kuching and Bintulu compared to other divisions studied in Sarawak. The bivalve species at Sarawak could have economic potentiality in terms of protein source, livelihoods of local tribes and economic value. Study suggests that if the high conservation and management of edible bivalve diversity could establish in the coastal and wetland area of Sarawak, a remarkable and vast economic return could achieve.
  Majid Karimian , A. Ourdjini , M.H. Idris , T. Chuan and Hassan Jafari
  In the present study an experimental investigation on lost foam casting of Al-Si cast alloy (LM6) has been conducted to control some process variables. The main objectives were to study the effect of different slurry viscosities and dipping times on coating thickness, casting integrity and surface roughness of prepared samples with five different section thicknesses ranging from 3 to 24 mm with foam density of 20 kg m-3. Suggested slurry for this research was Zircon flour plus colloidal silica. The different slurry viscosities and dipping times could cause different fillings at corners and edges in filled corners and sides, there was difference in surface roughness. The obtained results showed that slurry viscosity has a significant influence on the casting integrity as well as surface quality of lost foam casting of LM6 Al-Si alloy. Lower slurry viscosity provides thinner coating and as a result better gas escape, fulfilling and smoother surface. In the current research, slurry viscosity of 20 sec and dipping time of 20 sec provide the best filling the and most smooth surface finish.
  H. Hamli , M.H. Idris and S.K. Wong
  Aquaculture contributes about 20% of domestic fish production in Malaysia. Tilapia has been identified as one of the main species for freshwater aquaculture in the Third National Agriculture Policy (DPN3). However, feed cost and water quality management remain as two major challenges to the industry. This study aim to analyse the effects of Fermented Kitchen Waste (FKW) as water additives on water quality and growth performance of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Different concentration (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2%) of FKW were used to treat tilapia in tank culture for a period of twelve weeks. Physico-chemical parameters were also taken every week. Treatment with 0.1% FKW resulted in significant (p<0.05) decrease in ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels. The survival rates of tilapia treated with 0.05 and 0.1% FKW were comparable to the untreated control. Growth performance of the tilapia was measured in term of length and weight. Highest relative growth rate was observed in tilapia treated with 0.05% FKW. However, all the fish died in 0.2% FKW due to severe pH drop. Therefore, low concentration of FKW could severe as a potential water additive to improve water quality and promote growth in tilapia aquaculture.
  A.S.M. Saifullah , M.K. Abu Hena , M.H. Idris , A.R. Halimah and I. Johan
  The composition and diversity of phytoplankton were studied along with physico-chemical parameters of water of two mangrove-dominated estuaries i.e., Kuala Sibuti (KS) and Kuala Nyalau (KN), Sarawak, Malaysia. A total of 46 species of phytoplankton with the mean density of 147000 cells L-1 were recorded from KS estuary i.e., 3 species of Cyanophyceae; 22 species of Bacillariophyceae; 20 species of Dinophyceae and 1 species of Chlorophyceae. The recorded mean density of phytoplankton was 113000 cells L-1 with 33 species from 19 genera from KN estuary, in which 19 species were from Bacillariophyceae; 12 species were from Dinophyceae; 1 species was from Cyanophyceae and 1 species was from Chlorophyceae. In both the estuaries, the species composition was found to be in an order of Diatom>Dinoflagellate>Cyanophyceae>Chlorophyceae. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) revealed that the abundance of Bacillariophyceae and Dinoflagellates was influenced by salinity and conductivity along with ammonium and phosphate while the abundance of Chlorophyceae was influenced by temperature, TDS, DO and pH in KS. The influence of salinity and conductivity along with PO4 and NH4 on the abundance of Bacillariophyceae, Dinoflagellates and Chlorophyceae were observed in KN.
  M.K. Abu Hena , M.H. Idris , S.K. Wong and M.M. Kibria
  This study was conducted to assess the growth performance and survival rate of a commercially important finfish Eleutheronema tetradactylum in 100 m-2 of sandy clay brackish water earthen ponds. Wild 36.14 g of E. tetradactylum juveniles were stocked at 0.5 individuals m-2 and cultured for 45 days by feeding trash Muraenesox sp. (pike eel) at 12 h intervals. Average body weight of E. tetradactylum was found 75±5.6 g for treatment ponds and 65±3.57 g for control ponds at the end of experiment. Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) was 2.3 with the survival rate of 70-80% at the end of the culture in the experimental culture ponds. The results of the present study suggest that the production of four finger thread fin could still be increased up to the marketable size if it is done for 5-6 months culture period by feeding trash fish.
  H. Hamli , M.H. Idris , M.K. Abu Hena , S.K. Wong and A. Arshad
  Sarawak comprises of vast areas of wetland which is the habitat of huge number of edible gastropods. Among the wetland faunal composition, the edible gastropod is one of the important sources of animal protein for the local communities. This diversity of edible gastropod was studied from seven Divisions of Sarawak namely Kuching, Sibu, Mukah, Bintulu, Miri, Limbang and Lawas. Samples were collected from the wet market and catches from local fishermen. A total of 21 species representing 11 families and 16 genera of edible gastropods were identified from Sarawak. Cerithidea spp. was represented by three species while both Nerita and Pomacea were made up of three and two species each. Others were each represented by one single species. Six edible gastropod species belonged to the freshwater habitat while seven and eight species were recorded from brackish and marine habitats, respectively. Cerithidea and Pomacea showed wide geography amongst the Division and also highly distributed. Edible gastropods have high market value in the state of Sarawak and contribute significantly to the livelihoods of the certain indigenous communities in the state.
  I. Johan , M.K. Abu Hena , M.H. Idris and A. Arshad
  The abundance and composition of copepod was carried out in the coastal waters of Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia on March 2005. Samples were collected using conical plankton net with the mesh size of 153 μm. Copepod identified comprised of four orders namely, Calanoida, Cyclopoida, Harpacticoida and Poecilostomatoida. A total of 49 species belonging to 26 genera were identified. Nine most abundant species were Paracalanus crassirostris, Paracalanus elegans, Temora stylifera, Temora turbinata, Oncaea venusta, Corycaeus andrewsi, Corycaeus subtilis, Paracalanus parvus and Paracalanus denudatus. The first four species mentioned were the most abundant species and they accounted for over 50% of the total numbers of identified copepods. Copepod species which were rare and low in abundance included Delius nudus, Acrocalanus gracilis, Tortanus forcipatus, Centropages orsini, Corycaeus dahlia, Copilia mirabilis, Labidocera minuta, Microstetella rosea and Cosmocalanus darwini. Cosmocalanus darwini is new record to Malaysian waters. Species richness and diversity tends to increase towards the offshore while abundance increased towards the inshore stations.
  M.K. Abu Hena , S.M.S. Kohinoor , M.A.M. Siddique , J. Ismail , M.H. Idris and S.M.N. Amin
  Macrobenthos in coastal environment that play a significant role in the food web. It could also use as a good indicator of aquatic ecosystem health. The abundance and composition of macrobenthos in Bakkhali channel system, Cox’s Bazar were conducted in relation to the soil parameters. Samples were collected using Ekman Berge bottom grab from five different stations of Bakkhali channel. Macrobenthos were comprised of five major groups namely Polychaeta (9.96-30.31%), Oligochaeta (3.68-59.707%), Crustacea (0.02-58.40%), Bivalvia (1.40-82.09%) and Gastropoda (0.08-4.25%). Total number of macrobenthos was higher at station I (9000 individuals m-2) and station II (8517 individuals m-2) compared to other stations. Shannon diversity index among the stations ranged from 0.65-1.04. Soil pH and soil moisture ranged from 6.1-6.4 and 23.44-31.29%, respectively. The highest organic carbon concentration was observed at station I (2.11%) and lowest at station III (1.40%). Maximum fraction of sand by weight was found at stations II (81.88%) and III (87.88) while the highest fraction of clay (21.52%) and silt (8.0%) were recorded in station I. It was observed that benthic bivalves were positively correlated (r = 0.891, p>0.05) with silt fraction of the sediments.
 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility