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Articles by M. Buyinza
Total Records ( 9 ) for M. Buyinza
  F. Mugagga , M. Buyinza and V. Kakembo
  Land resources in Uganda are continuously shrinking and getting degraded despite being the main livelihood assets for rural communities. Using the modified household economic model, this study examines the socioeconomic factors and conditions affecting household productivity and land degradation on the slopes of Mt Elgon. Primary data were obtained through household survey conducted in Tsekululu Sub County, Bubulo County, Manafwa District, Eastern Uganda between May and August 2008. The results reveal that agriculture and dependence on park environmental resources as the main sources of livelihoods for the communities surrounding the park. Extraction of environmental resources from the park is dominated by the energetic, young and productive age groups. About 90% of the respondents use environmental resources as medicine, firewood, animal fodder, for domestic, agricultural, socio-cultural and commercial purposes. Results further indicate that age of household head, type of dwelling, size of land owned, private land ownership and park encroachment significantly affect household productivity at the 95% (p = 0.05) confidence level. Slash and burn accelerates soil erosion and reduces soil fertility in the study area while crop rotation and mulching enhance soil conservation. The insecure land tenure of the communities adjacent to the park compromises their ability to adopt soil conservation measures. It is recommended that land policies addressing the security of park adjacent communities and agricultural interventions focusing on agro forestry be formulated and implemented in the area. The communities should be mobilized to form needs-driven cooperative groups.
  A.C. Otieno , R.A. Kapiyo , B.O. Oindo and M. Buyinza
  De-legitimization of policies on natural resources manifested in non-compliance and ineffective enforcement in developing countries has a bearing on the new competitive political dispensation amongst these countries, Uganda inclusively. The natural resources have been dished out as handouts by politicians or through political influence hence their petering out, hither to government forest reserves inclusively. A study of 344 households engulfing and within South Busoga Central Forest Reserve, Mayuge district and 31 conservationists forming the government regulatory system showed that there was a low correlation between government regulatory system and the local community’s compliance with the Uganda Forestry Policy 2001 at 0.471. The SWOT analysis showed that strengths were slightly higher than weakness where insufficient power and corruption usurped the strengths of National Forestry Authority (NFA) in its enforcement. It was also found that local politicians usurped both the powers and authority of NFA in enforcement of UFP 2001 hence, rendering NFA officials incompetent. The local communities were positive towards compliance at Likert scale rate 360 willing to stop, 305 very much willing to comply with the policy while 320 some what willing. Thus to avoid de-legitimization of the UFP 2001, there was a need to have a positive political will.
  A.C. Otieno , R.A. Kapiyo , B.O. Oindo and M. Buyinza
  Administrative innuendo exhibited in the Ugandan forestry docket had its genesis from de-legitimisation of the policies ostensibly, attributed to conflicts by stakeholders on natural resources, manifested in non-compliance and ineffective enforcement hence, the petering out of the government owned forest reserves in the country. A total of 344 respondents participated from the households within and engulfing South Busoga Central Forest Reserve (SBCFR) and 31 conservationists forming the government regulatory system participated in this research. The study showed that there was a moderate relationship between government regulatory system and the local community’s compliance with the UFP in 2001 at 0.422. The Chi statistic values showed that none of the elements of the government regulatory system was <9.21 at 0.01 df = 2 thus statistically insignificant. It was also found that the elements of government regulatory system were not properly coordinated despite being loosely under NEMA and the local politicians usurped both the powers and authority of NFA in either enforcement of UFP in 2001 hence, rendering NFA officials incompetent. Thus to avoid de-legitimization of the UFP 2001, there was a need to have a positive political will and NFA to reclaim from the politicians its constitutional rights to effectively manage the central forest reserves in the country.
  A.C. Otieno , M. Buyinza , R.A. Kapiyo and B.O. Oindo
  Bureaucratic controls over natural resources when tightened world over Uganda inclusive have often led to heightened conflicts amongst apparent stakeholders. This has furthered assault on the ecosystem rather than conservation in developing countries. Collaborative Forest Management (CFM), an all inclusive approach on agreement is ostensibly an effective conservation strategy for the protected forest resources openly accessed in most developing nations. A study of 225 households in the proximity of West Bugwe Forest Reserve (WBFR), Busia district in Eastern Uganda revealed that many respondents agreed that poverty (93.2%) and pressure on land (92%) were cardinal push factors into non-compliance with the forestry policy at WBFR while the illegalities carried out were charcoal burning, fuel wood collection, construction material exploitation and farming in the forest reserve; the local communities were ready to conserve the WBFR through out the three parishes where H was 4.1<χ2 = 15.5 and using a Likert scale the local communities living adjacent to WBFR were positive towards their relationship with National Forestry Authority (NFA) officials in CFM. This was manifested in their scores of response viz. very much willing (370), willing (272) and a close to two thirds positive response (63.1%). Contradictorily less than half (40.5%) trusted NFA in the CFM despite a relatively high rating as very trustworthy (235) and trustworthy (176). In collaboration the local communities agreed to be active in conservation and protection of WBFR. The researchers therefore recommended that CFM be adopted in the area, communication be improved, energy saving stoves be used, government to be positive in poverty alleviation country wide, the local communities engage in commercial farming and trait transformation amongst the NFA officials.
  M. Buyinza , C. Khainza and M. Bukenya
  As the human population increases, the demand for utilization of wetlands for agricultural and industrial production will also increase. A study to explore the socio-economic factors that influence the household dependency on brick making in wetlands was carried out between June-August 2005 in Goma sub-county, Mukono district, Uganda. Semi-structured questionnaires were administered to 50 randomly selected respondents. Results from the maximum likelihood estimation of a logistic regression model suggest that the factors that there is a high rate of dependency on brick making and household income where by the poor households depend more on brick making. Several household level factors such as distance to the wetland, age, landholding and the level of education significantly affect the dependency to brick making industry. The sustainable utilization and conservation of wetlands will be generally greatly enhanced if the local communities are actively involved in the sustainable management of the wetland resource since their livelihoods directly depend on them.
  A.C. Otieno and M. Buyinza
  The idea of Collaborative Forest Management (CFM) is ostensibly a conservation panacea in conflict prone forest resource management in developing countries. Most of these economies have about 40% of their population poor and eking life from natural resources in their neighbourhood, a point of conflict with government agents meant to conserve the resources, West Bugwe Forest Reserve (WBFR) epitomized this situation in Uganda. The study aimed at assessing the potentialities of CFM with a goal of sustainable forest resource management of WBFR. The findings from 233 respondents revealed that illegal human activities viz. charcoal burning, fuel wood collection and farming were responsible for the deforestation of WBFR; the forest officials were both actively involved and by proxy engaged in the given illegal activities; main push factors to the forest reserve were poverty, domestic needs, inadequate land, landlessness and ignorance of the policy and CFM was found to be a significant tool in reducing deforestation of WBFR. It was felt that government enhance the resources in the forest department, motivate the forest officials and encourage CFM to resolve the disparities between the local communities and foresters, making both parties accountable and benefit from the forest resources at their proximity.
  A.C. Otieno and M. Buyinza
  The idea of Collaborative Forest Management (CFM) is ostensibly a conservation panacea in conflict prone forest resource management in developing countries. Most of these economies have about 40% of their population poor and eking life from natural resources in their neighbourhood, a point of conflict with government agents meant to conserve the resources, West Bugwe Forest Reserve (WBFR) epitomized this situation in Uganda. The study aimed at assessing the potentialities of CFM, with a goal of sustainable forest resource management of WBFR. The findings from 233 respondents revealed that illegal human activities viz. charcoal burning, fuel wood collection and farming were responsible for the deforestation of WBFR; the forest officials were both actively involved and by proxy engaged in the given illegal activities; main push factors to the forest reserve were poverty, domestic needs, inadequate land, landlessness and ignorance of the policy and CFM was found to be a significant tool in reducing deforestation of WBFR. It was felt that government enhance the resources in the forest department, motivate the forest officials and encourage CFM to resolve the disparities between the local communities and foresters, making both parties accountable and benefit from the forest resources at their proximity.
  A.C. Otieno , M. Buyinza , R.A. Kapiyo and B.O. Oindo
  The central forest reserves in Uganda are open access loosely guarded by ostensibly ill-enforced Uganda Forestry Policy 2001. Conflict of interest amongst the stakeholders led to their devegatation by the local communities engulfing them exemplified by their immense encroachments in the country. A study of 225 house holds in the proximity of West Bugwe Central Forest Reserve (WBCFR), Busia district revealed that fuel wood collection and extraction of construction materials had gone beyond the legally accepted reasonable quantities hence instrumental to deforestation there was a high/strong relationship at r = 0.66 at a 0.05 level of significance between the Bulumbi sub-county local communities and the Busitema sub-county local communities’ perception on illegalities leading to deforestation of WBCFR, Busia district, charcoal burning as an illegality destined to Busia conurbation as was detrimental to the conservation of WBCFR, Busia district and none of the strategies the NFA officials adopted to curb deforestation viz. strict supervision, imprisoning encroachers, mass sensitization, reforestation and trustworthiness was statistically significant at df = 2 at 0.01 = 9.210. Researchers therefore recommended that there was a need to accommodate the local communities in the management of WBCFR in their proximity through collaborative forest management to avoid administrative conflicts in this area. Through this, NFA should introduce participatory monitoring, evaluation and effective sensitization to avert the ineffectiveness of strict supervision and imprisonment.
  F. Mugagga and M. Buyinza
  Property rights have been noted to increasingly play a central role in the use management of natural resources and land resources form the main asset for the derivation of livelihoods by most rural communities. This study examines the implications of land tenure on soil conservation on the slopes of Mt Elgon, Eastern Uganda. Primary data were obtained through household interviews with key informants and field observations conducted in Tsekululu Sub-County, Bubulo County, Manafwa District, Eastern Uganda between September and December 2012. The sampled parishes were stratified according to their distance from the park boundary. SPSS (16) was used to compute descriptive statistics such as frequencies and percentages. Check dams and gulley controls were the most common structural measures adopted by farmers in all the three sites, although, overall the level of adoption within park-adjacent communities was lower compared to the further away sites. The reluctance to invest in long term conservation techniques by park adjacent communities emanates from the separation of ownership from cultivation of the land while the high adoption rate by distant communities is attributed to the transferability, alienability, exclusivity and enforceability rights that secure private land. It can thus, be concluded that land tenure and insecurity variables are very important determinants to soil conservation. Thus, a policy environment that guarantees the security of land occupancy by park adjacent farmers could help in generating the right incentives for investing in soil conservation thereby, improving both farm productivity and land quality while protecting the remaining forest from encroachment in search of fertile agricultural lands. Success thereof will be achieved if the politicians, park authorities and local communities jointly participate in their design and implementation.
 
 
 
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