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Articles by M. Al-Hashem
Total Records ( 3 ) for M. Al-Hashem
  M. Al-Hashem
  Desert locations in Al-Burgan oil fields of Kuwait were subjected to oil pollution generated by the Gulf war in 1990. Studying sand lizard (Acanthodactylus scutellatus) population and their ant prey in the years 2002 and 2003 to monitor the effects of oil pollution was thought to be useful in an area damaged by oil spill. Sites with apparently different levels of pollution, namely tar mat, soot and clear sites were compared with control sites outside this area. Live specimens of A. scutellatus were collected by drift fence and pitfall traps and were marked by toe clipping and painting bands before they were released. Ant population was collected by removal methods using vacuum. The mark-recapture Schnabel method of population estimation was used. The results revealed no difference in lizard population sizes between the different study sites in 2002 and 2003. A slight difference was observed in ant population sizes between the sites in 2002 but no difference was detected between the sites in 2003. Although, the mean estimated lizard numbers were lowest at the tar mat sites, the ant number in this location was greatest, meaning that food availability was highest at these sites. This suggests any reduction in the numbers of lizards is unrelated to low resource availability.
  M. Al-Hashem
  Desert ecosystems in Al-Burgan oil fields of Kuwait were contaminated by heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons due to oil spill generated by the Gulf War in 1990. Studying sand lizard (Acanthodactylus scutellatus) population and their ant prey in the years 2002 and 2003 to detect the effects of oil pollution is now a focus of study. Polluted sites with apparently different degrees of pollution (namely tar mat, soot and clear sites) were compared with control sites outside this region. Total lizard numbers were recorded by using transect method. Number of ants was recorded by walking the transects and counting ants present. The results showed no difference in lizard population between the different study sites in 2002 and 2003 by applying the transect method. No difference in ant populations between the different study sites in 2002 and 2003. Although, the mean estimated lizard numbers were lower at the tar mat sites, the ant number in this location was greatest, meaning that food availability was highest at these sites. This suggests any reduction in the numbers of lizards is unrelated to low resource availability. The lizard numbers at the tar mat sites could be depressed by some property of the pollutants.
  M. Al-Hashem and P.F. Brain
  This study investigated the impact of oil pollution on morphological measurements in adult male and female sand lizards captured in locations with apparently different pollution levels. The results of this study confirmed that there is sexual dimorphism in body size, with males being generally larger than females at all the study sites. Adult male (but not female) lizards were generally bigger at the Tar mat and soot than the clear and control sites. The increase in body size and weight suggests that there is a greater availability of food for these somewhat territorial reptiles in both the Tar mat and soot sites. An alternative explanation is that the food resource is affected by oil pollution such that lizards consuming prey with high levels of fat accumulate more adipose tissue in their bodies.
 
 
 
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