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Articles by M. Idu
Total Records ( 10 ) for M. Idu
  M. Idu , F.E. Oronsaye , C.L. Igeleke , S.E. Omonigho , O.E. Omogbeme and B.A. Ayinde
  The phytochemistry and antimicrobial effects of water, methanol, chloroform and petroleum ether extracts of Senna alata leaves were studied. Extracts tested at a final concentration of 500 μg mL produced in vitro antimicrobial activities in assays against clinical isolates of Staphylococus aureus, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonans aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis. The zones of inhibitions produced by the extracts in agar diffusion assay against the test micro organisms ranged from 8 to 20 mm while the gentamycin antibiotic control produced zones that measured 5 mm. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the plant extracts showed the presence of phenols, tannins, anthraquinoes, saponins, flavonoids.
  O. Timothy , M. Idu , A. Falodun and F.E. Oronsaye
  This study was aimed at determining the phytochemistry and antimicrobial properties of the methanolic extract of Baissea axillaris leaf. Phytochemical analyses of B. axillaris leaf using procedures described by Trease and Evans, revealed the presence of saponins, phenolic compounds, eugenol oil, glycosides and tannins. Methanolic extract of the leaf showed antimicrobial activities against some organisms. The extract was most active against Staphylococcus aureus yielding the highest zone of inhibition (15 mm) as well as the least minimum inhibition concentration of 125 μg mL-1. It was least effective against Escherichia coli as minimum inhibition concentration was above 500 μg mL-1.
  M. Idu , J.E. Ataman , A.O. Akhigbe , E.K.I. Omogbai , F. Amaechina and E.A. Odia
  Effect of powdered Stachytarpheta jamaicensis L. leaves known for treating different ailments was investigated for toxicity. In the study, twenty Wister rats (male and female) after due acclimatization, were fed with different graded mixtures of feed mash and the treatment plant. The animals were weighed and divided into four groups of three treatment groups and one control group with each group consisting of five rats. The rats were administered different concentrations of powdered S. jamaicensis leaves mixed with different amount of feed mash. i.e., 75, 50 and 25 g of S. jamaicensis was mixed with 25, 50 and 75 g of normal feed mash. The control was fed only with feed mash all through the period of experiment. The results revealed levels of Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP), Serum Glutamate Oxaloacetate Transaminase (SGOT) and Serum Glutamate Pyruvate Transaminase (SGPT) were slightly elevated (p>0.05). Bilirubin levels in all the groups showed slight variation (p>0.05) when compared with control. The ultrasound picture of heart, liver, kidney and spleen showed no significant difference from control. From the results obtained, no significant alteration in the normal serum biochemistry as well as in the echogenic pattern was identified between the control and experimental rats thus suggesting wide therapeutic safety margin in the use of S. jamaicensis.
  J.E. Ataman , D.B. Grillo , E.K.I. Omongbai , M. Idu , F. Amaechina , V. Okonji and B.A. Ayinde
  Phytochemistry of Momordica charantia L. leaves revealed the presence of flavonoids and tannins. The hypoglycaemic effect of M. charantia leaves as well as the plant`s effect on rats` weight under different treatment patterns was assessed. Forty wistar rats weighing between 140-250 g were categorized into eight experimental groups of five wistar rats per group. The efficacy of 250 mg kg-1 methanolic extract of the leaves on alloxan-induced diabetic rats showed mild hypoglycaemic effect within 24 h. There was no evidence to establish that parenteral route is more efficacious than the oral route of administration of the treatment plant. The experimental rats that was alloxan-treated to induce hyperglycaemia and treated with 500 mg kg-1 of methanolic extract of the treatment plant as well as those induced with alloxan without treatment with methanolic extract of M. charantia showed significant loss in weight (p < 0.05) after twelve weeks. The controls as well as those treated exclusively with methanolic extract of treatment plant without alloxan treatment had significant weight gain (p < 0.05). The results generally indicate that methanolic extract of the leaves of M. charantia has hypoglycaemic potential especially on long-term use.
  J.E. Ataman , M. Idu , E.A. Odia , E.K.I. Omogbai , F. Amaechina , A.O. Akhigbe and L.E. Ebite
  The toxicity of powdered Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl. leaves, known for treating different ailments such as diabetes, hypertension and bacterial infections in some Nigerian communities, was investigated in rats. Twenty Wister rats (male and female) were fed with different graded mixtures of Pfizer feed mash and the leaf powder. The animals were weighed and divided into four groups of three treatment groups and one control group with each group consisting of five rats. The rats were administered different concentrations of powdered S. jamaicensis leaves mixed with different amount of feed mash.i.e. 75, 50 and 5 g of S. jamaicensis was mixed with 25, 50 and 75 g of normal feed mash. The control was fed only with feed mash all through the period of experiment. The results obtained showed slight variation on the physical signs/body appearance of the animals and mild histopathlogic 1esions such as congestion, fatty changes and necrosis in selective tissues such as the liver, blood vessels, kidney, lung and testis but the brain, eyes, intestines (small and large) and heart tissues were essentially normal. S. jamaicensis seem to cause mild non-dose dependent systemic toxicity in some specific tissues.
  M. Idu and B.C. Ndukwu
  Studies were carried out to inventorize, assess and document plant species and plant products used in ethnomedicine by the indigenous people of Ethiope Council Area, Delta State Nigeria. The studies revealed that a total of 53 species spread into 31 angiosperm families were used traditionally for various medicinal purposes. The studies further revealed that the indigenous people have developed various ways of identifying, harvesting, processing, storing and administering preparations from these plants. It was also observed that the cultivation and conservation of these plants is receiving increased attention by the people. The relevance of these observations in the efforts towards documenting indigenous knowledge and use of plants especially in the area of traditional health care system is discussed.
  M. Idu and O.O. Osemwegie
  A survey of useful medicinal plants of Okomu Forest Reserve was undertaken and a total of 60 species of plants comprising of 50 leafy plants and 10 mushrooms were identified and recognized to be useful in native health care services by inhabitants of various communities in the South-South of Nigeria. Different southern Nigerian communities show not only individual characteristic dialect, culture and therapeutic practices involving the application of ethnomedicinal plants but also share common indigenous folk knowledge of what plant is used for the treatment of which ailment. Studies also show that 75% of men in most rural communities visited have inherited ethnobotanical knowledge from their fathers.
  M. Idu and H.I. Onyibe
  An ethno-medical field survey was carried in communities spanning the three vegetation (Fresh Water Swamp, Lowland Rain Forest and Derived Savanna) zones of Edo State, Nigeria. 300 plant species distributed in 247 genera, belonging to 77 families, used in the treatment of various diseases were enumerated, identified and their ethnomedical value documented. The most used species include: Ageratum conyzoides, Asystasia gangetica, Azadirachta indica, Calopogonium muconoides, Carica papaya, Chromolaena odorata, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus sinensis, Cocos nucifera, Colocasia esculenta, Commelina erecta, Elaeis guineensis, Eleusine indica, Ficus benghalensis, Gmelina arborea, Hura crepitans, Irvingia gabonensis, Mangifera indica, Manihot esculenta, Musa paradisiaca, Musa sapientum, Nauclea pobeguinii, Newbouldia laevis, Phyllanthus amarus, Psidium guajava, Sida acuta, Spondias mombin and Synedrella nodiflora. Leaves and roots were the most frequently used plant parts while malaria fever, muscular pains, gastrointestinal problems, cardiovascular problems, bronchial problems and skin infections are amongst the frequently managed conditions malaria fever, muscular pains, gastrointestinal problems, cardiovascular problems, bronchial problems and skin infections among others.
  M. Idu , E.K.I. Omogbai , G.E. Aghimien , F. Amaechina , O. Timothy and S.E. Omonigho
  he phytochemical analysis carried out on the leaves of Stachytarpheta jamaicensis showed the presence of secondary metabolites including tanins, saponins and flavonoids which have great medicinal property. Crude concentrations of aqueous extract of leaves showed varying activities on Bacillus subtillis, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aureginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella arogene, Proteus mirabilis and J62K1 serving as control. Similar trend applied to the alcoholic extract of leaf but slight inhibition was observed on Staphyllococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris thus indicating it’s antimicrobial effect but at high concentration. The acute toxicity of the aqueous extract on Winstar rats revealed no mortality even up to dose of 4 g kg-1 body weight and no significant changes in body weight p>0.05. Also, eye color was normal and loss of hair was absence. Thus indicating that the plant is therapeutically safe for use even at high concentration, though the chronic effect was not investigated.
  J.E. Ataman and M. Idu
  Histopathologic assessment of the effects of 500 mg kg-1 methanolic extract of the leaves of Momordica charantia on liver of wistar rats was carried out. Forty wistar rats of equal sex weighing between 140-250 g were randomly categorised into eight experimental groups of five wistar rats per group. One main control group M and seven treatment groups A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2 and D. A1, A2, B1 and B2 groups were treated with alloxan intraperitoneally. However, while A1 group received 500 mg kg-1 (2 mL) of extract treatment, A2, B1 and B2 had no extract treatment. A2 received 2 mL of methanol. C1 group were normoglycaemic rats with no alloxan treatment, but were given 500 mg kg-1 (2 mL) of extract treatment orally. C2 group (also normoglycaemic without alloxan treatment) received 2 mL of methanol in place of extract treatment. The D group had 500 mg kg-1 (2 mL) of extract treatment intraperitoneally without alloxan treatment. Histopathologic assessment revealed acute congestion of the liver with fluid, enlarged portal triad, pericentral vein haemorrhage and centrilobular necrosis in the A1 treatment. A similar but lesser lesion in D treatment was noticed and essentially normal tissues was observed in all other treatments including the C1 tissues that had extract via the oral route. Significant difference (p<0.05) were observed in the Serum Alkaline Phosphatase, L-alanine aminotransferase, L-aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and conjugated bilirubin in the treated rats of the various groups; but the cholesterol levels was not significantly different (p>0.05) from control. The results generally indicate that methanolic extract of the leaves of Momordica charantia Linn is relatively safe when used orally, but parenteral administration suggests need for caution on indiscriminate use because of its potentially hazardous effect on tissues like the liver; especially on long term use.
 
 
 
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