Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by M. E Zafereo
Total Records ( 3 ) for M. E Zafereo
  L. M Chen , G Li , L. R Reitzel , K. B Pytynia , M. E Zafereo , Q Wei and E. M. Sturgis
 

It is unknown whether population-level racial or ethnic disparities in mortality from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) also occur in the setting of standardized multidisciplinary-team directed care. Therefore, we conducted a matched-pair study that controlled for several potentially confounding prognostic variables to assess whether a difference in survival exists for African American or Hispanic American compared with non-Hispanic white American SCCHN patients receiving similar care. Matched pairs were 81 African American case and 81 non-Hispanic white control patients and 100 Hispanic American cases and 100 matched non-Hispanic white controls selected from 1,833 patients of a prospective epidemiologic study of incident SCCHN within a single, large multidisciplinary cancer center. Matching variables included age (±10 years), sex, smoking status (never versus ever), site, tumor stage (T1-2 versus T3-4), nodal status (negative versus positive), and treatment. Cases and controls were not significantly different in proportions of comorbidity score, alcohol use, subsite distribution, overall stage, or tumor grade. Matched-pair and log-rank analyses showed no significant differences between cases and controls in recurrence-free, disease-specific, or overall survival. Site-specific analyses suggested that more aggressive oropharyngeal cancers occurred more frequently in minority than in non-Hispanic white patients. We conclude that minority and non-Hispanic white SCCHN patients receiving similar multidisciplinary-team directed care at a tertiary cancer center have similar survival results overall. These results encourage reducing health disparities in SCCHN through public-health efforts to improve access to multidisciplinary oncologic care (and to preventive measures) and through individual clinician efforts to make the best multidisciplinary cancer treatment choices available for their minority patients. The subgroup finding suggests a biologically based racial/ethnic disparity among oropharyngeal patients and that prevention and treatment strategies should be tailored to different populations of these patients.

  M. E Zafereo , E. M Sturgis , Z Liu , L. E Wang and G. Li
 

The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway is central in response to damage induced by environmental carcinogens. Efficiency of this pathway, probably genetically determined, may modulate individual risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) as well as second primary malignancy (SPM) after the index tumor. We hypothesized that common non-synonymous and regulatory single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NER core genes individually, and more probably collectively, associated with the risk of SPM. We genotyped for seven selected SNPs in 1376 incident SCCHN patients who were prospectively recruited between 1995 and 2006 and followed for SPM development. We found that 110 patients (8%) developed SPM: 43 (39%) second SCCHN; 38 (35%) other tobacco-associated sites and 29 (26%) other non-tobacco-associated sites. The associations of these SNPs with SPM risk were assessed assuming a recessive genetic model. We did not find any significant associations of each or in combination of the seven SNPs with SPM risk in the recessive models. However, when we explored the combined effect based on an alternatively dominant genetic model, we found that the number of observed risk genotypes was associated with a significantly increased SPM risk in a dose-response manner (P = 0.005) and patients with five to seven risk genotypes had a significantly 2.4-fold increased SPM risk compared with patients with zero to two risk genotypes. These findings suggest that a profile of NER core gene polymorphisms might collectively contribute to risk of SPM not in a recessive model but in a dominant model among patients with an index primary SCCHN. These findings need to be validated in future studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up time.

  D Lei , E. M Sturgis , Z Liu , M. E Zafereo , Q Wei and G. Li
 

p21 plays an important role in modulating cell cycle control, inducing apoptosis, and inhibiting cell growth, subsequently affecting cancer risk. We investigated the association between two putatively functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of p21 (p21 C98A and p21 C70T) among 1282 patients diagnosed with incident squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and risk of second primary malignancy (SPM) in an ongoing molecular epidemiology study. We used Log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard models to assess the association of these two SNPs with SPM-free survival and SPM risk. We found that patients with either p21 variant genotypes of the two polymorphisms had a significantly reduced SPM-free survival compared with patients with either p21 wild-type homozygous genotypes (Log-rank test, P = 0.0016). Compared with patients having the p21 98 CC and p21 70 CC genotypes, the patients having p21 98 CA/AA and p21 70 CT/TT variant genotypes had a significantly greater risk of developing SPM, respectively, [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.14–2.82 for p21 C98A and HR = 1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.16–2.85 for p21 C70T]. Moreover, after combining the variant genotypes of two SNPs, patients with variant genotypes had a significantly moderately increased risk for SPM compared with patients with no variant genotypes (HR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.26–3.00), and the risk was particularly pronounced in several subgroups. Our results support an increased risk of SPM after index SCCHN with both p21 polymorphisms individually and in combination.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility