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Articles by M. D McClean
Total Records ( 7 ) for M. D McClean
  C Liang , M. D McClean , C Marsit , B Christensen , E Peters , H. H Nelson and K. T. Kelsey
 

Cannabinoids, constituents of marijuana smoke, have been recognized to have potential antitumor properties. However, the epidemiologic evidence addressing the relationship between marijuana use and the induction of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is inconsistent and conflicting.

Cases (n = 434) were patients with incident HNSCC disease from nine medical facilities in the Greater Boston, MA area between December 1999 and December 2003. Controls (n = 547) were frequency matched to cases on age (±3 years), gender, and town of residence, randomly selected from Massachusetts town books. A questionnaire was adopted to collect information on lifetime marijuana use (decade-specific exposures) and associations evaluated using unconditional logistic regression.

After adjusting for potential confounders (including smoking and alcohol drinking), 10 to 20 years of marijuana use was associated with a significantly reduced risk of HNSCC [odds ratio (OR)10-<20 years versus never users, 0.38; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.67]. Among marijuana users moderate weekly use was associated with reduced risk (OR0.5-<1.5 times versus <0.5 time, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.32-0.85). The magnitude of reduced risk was more pronounced for those who started use at an older age (OR15-<20 years versus never users, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.30-0.95; OR≥20 years versus never users, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.17-0.90; Ptrend < 0.001). These inverse associations did not depend on human papillomavirus 16 antibody status. However, for the subjects who have the same level of smoking or alcohol drinking, we observed attenuated risk of HNSCC among those who use marijuana compared with those who do not.

Our study suggests that moderate marijuana use is associated with reduced risk of HNSCC.

  A. A Chen , C. J Marsit , B. C Christensen , E.A Houseman , M. D McClean , J. F Smith , J. T Bryan , M. R Posner , H. H Nelson and K. T. Kelsey
 

Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infection is an etiologic factor in a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). It is unknown if host genetic susceptibility modifies the HPV16–HNSCC association. DNA samples collected as part of a Boston area case–control study of HNSCC were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the National Cancer Institute's SNP500Cancer database. Analysis of demographic, phenotypic and genotypic data for 319 HNSCC cases and 495 frequency-matched controls was performed using unconditional logistic regression. All reported P-values are two sided. We identified a polymorphism in the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter SLC23A2 that modifies the risk of HNSCC associated with HPV16 infection. Among those with a wild-type allele at SLC23A2, the risk of HNSCC associated with HPV16-positive serology was 5.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.2–7.8). However, among those with a homozygous variant genotype, the risk of HNSCC associated with HPV16 was attenuated [odds ratio (OR) = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.2–6.2]. Further, when we tested whether genotype modified the interaction between citrus exposure, HPV16, and HNSCC, we found a dramatically increased risk of HNSCC for those with a wild-type SLC23A2 allele, HPV16-positive serology and high citrus intake (OR = 7.4; 95% CI = 3.6–15.1). These results suggest that SLC23A2 genetic variation alters HPV16-associated HNSCC while also highlighting the important role of citrus exposure in this disease.

  B. C Christensen , B. J Moyer , M Avissar , L. G Ouellet , S. L Plaza , M. D McClean , C. J Marsit and K. T. Kelsey
 

MicroRNA (miRNA)-binding site polymorphisms that could contribute to disease risk and prognosis are rapidly being identified and investigated as this genetic variation may have a potentially profound impact on human health. A recently described variant allele in the KRAS 3' untranslated region that arises in the let-7 miRNA complementary site (KRAS-LCS6) and leads to increased KRAS expression in lung cancer was examined for its association with the occurrence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We examined the prevalence of the KRAS-LCS6 variant allele in a population-based case–control study of HNSCC to determine if this KRAS-LCS6 genotype was associated with disease occurrence and patient survival. Although the KRAS-LCS6 variant genotype was not associated with the overall risk of HNSCC, cases with the KRAS-LCS6 variant genotype had significantly reduced survival [hazard ratio (HR), 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0–2.5] in models controlled for confounders of survival. This risk was greatest in cases of oral cavity carcinoma (HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4–5.3). These data demonstrate that cases with the KRAS-LCS6 variant have significantly reduced survival time and suggest that this variant may alter the phenotype or therapeutic response of this disease.

  M Avissar , M. D McClean , K. T Kelsey and C. J. Marsit
 

The contribution of microRNAs (miRNAs) to carcinogenesis in many tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), is clear, but the etiology and clinical significance of their alteration remain important questions. Our previous work has identified four miRNAs as differentially expressed HNSCCs compared with non-diseased epithelia and showed that there is potential diagnostic utility in examining their expression. Here, we used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine the relative expression of these miRNAs in a larger independent case series of HNSCC tumors (n = 169), examining associations of miRNA expression with exposures and clinical features associated with HNSCC. In multivariate analyses, expression of miR-375 was shown to increase with alcohol consumption (P = 0.002) and showed higher expression in tumors of pharyngeal and laryngeal origin compared with oral tumors (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Additionally, high miR-21 expression was associated with significantly decreased 5 year survival in patients (hazard ratio, 1.68; 95% CI: 1.04–2.77) in a model controlled for patient age, gender and tumor stage. Together, these data suggest that alterations in miRNA expression are related to exposures causal in head and neck cancer and may be useful biomarkers of patient outcome.

  J. R Sobus , M. D Mcclean , R. F Herrick , S Waidyanatha , F Onyemauwa , L. L Kupper and S. M. Rappaport
 

Airborne emissions from hot asphalt contain mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including several carcinogens. We investigated urinary biomarkers of three PAHs, namely naphthalene (Nap), phenanthrene (Phe), and pyrene (Pyr) in 20 road-paving workers exposed to hot asphalt and in 6 road milling workers who were not using hot asphalt (reference group). Our analysis included baseline urine samples as well as postshift, bedtime, and morning samples collected over three consecutive days. We measured unmetabolized Nap (U-Nap) and Phe (U-Phe) as well as the monohydroxylated metabolites of Nap (OH-Nap), Phe (OH-Phe), and Pyr (OH-Pyr) in each urine sample. In baseline samples, no significant differences in biomarker levels were observed between pavers and millers, suggesting similar background exposures. In postshift, bedtime, and morning urine samples, the high pairwise correlations observed between levels of all biomarkers suggest common exposure sources. Among pavers, levels of all biomarkers were significantly elevated in postshift samples, indicating rapid uptake and elimination of PAHs following exposure to hot asphalt (biomarker levels were not elevated among millers). Results from linear mixed-effects models of levels of U-Nap, U-Phe, OH-Phe, and OH-Pyr across pavers showed significant effects of work assignments with roller operators having lower biomarker levels than the other workers. However, no work-related effect was observed for levels of OH-Nap, apparently due to the influence of cigarette smoking. Biological half-lives, estimated from regression coefficients for time among pavers, were 8 h for U-Phe, 10 h for U-Nap, 13 h for OH-Phe and OH-Pyr, and 26 h for OH-Nap. These results support the use of U-Nap, U-Phe, OH-Phe, and OH-Pyr, but probably not OH-Nap, as short-term biomarkers of exposure to PAHs emanating from hot asphalt.

  J. R Sobus , M. D McClean , R. F Herrick , S Waidyanatha , L. A Nylander French , L. L Kupper and S. M. Rappaport
 

When working with hot mix asphalt, road pavers are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) through the inhalation of vapors and particulate matter (PM) and through dermal contact with PM and contaminated surfaces. Several PAHs with four to six rings are potent carcinogens which reside in these particulate emissions. Since urinary biomarkers of large PAHs are rarely detectable in asphalt workers, attention has focused upon urinary levels of the more volatile and abundant two-ring and three-ring PAHs as potential biomarkers of PAH exposure. Here, we compare levels of particulate polycyclic aromatic compounds (P-PACs, a group of aromatic hydrocarbons containing PAHs and heterocyclic compounds with four or more rings) in air and dermal patch samples from 20 road pavers to the corresponding urinary levels of naphthalene (U-Nap) (two rings), phenanthrene (U-Phe) (three rings), monohydroxylated metabolites of naphthalene (OH-Nap) and phenanthrene (OH-Phe), and 1-hydroxypyrene (OH-Pyr) (four rings), the most widely used biomarker of PAH exposure. For each worker, daily breathing-zone air (n = 55) and dermal patch samples (n = 56) were collected on three consecutive workdays along with postshift, bedtime, and morning urine samples (n = 149). Measured levels of P-PACs and the urinary analytes were used to statistically model exposure–biomarker relationships while controlling for urinary creatinine, smoking status, age, body mass index, and the timing of urine sampling. Levels of OH-Phe in urine collected postshift, at bedtime, and the following morning were all significantly associated with levels of P-PACs in air and dermal patch samples. For U-Nap, U-Phe, and OH-Pyr, both air and dermal patch measurements of P-PACs were significant predictors of postshift urine levels, and dermal patch measurements were significant predictors of bedtime urine levels (all three analytes) and morning urine levels (U-Nap and OH-Pyr only). Significant effects of creatinine concentration were observed for all analytes, and modest effects of smoking status and body mass index were observed for U-Phe and OH-Pyr, respectively. Levels of OH-Nap were not associated with P-PAC measurements in air or dermal patch samples but were significantly affected by smoking status, age, day of sample collection, and urinary creatinine. We conclude that U-Nap, U-Phe, OH-Phe, and OH-Pyr can be used as biomarkers of exposure to particulate asphalt emissions, with OH-Phe being the most promising candidate. Indications that levels of U-Nap, U-Phe, and OH-Pyr were significantly associated with dermal patch measurements well into the evening after a given work shift, combined with the small ratios of within-person variance components to between-person variance components at bedtime, suggest that bedtime measurements may be useful for investigating dermal PAH exposures.

 
 
 
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