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Articles by M. D Gross
Total Records ( 3 ) for M. D Gross
  A. A Arslan , K. J Helzlsouer , C Kooperberg , X. O Shu , E Steplowski , H. B Bueno de Mesquita , C. S Fuchs , M. D Gross , E. J Jacobs , A. Z LaCroix , G. M Petersen , R. Z Stolzenberg Solomon , W Zheng , D Albanes , L Amundadottir , W. R Bamlet , A Barricarte , S. A Bingham , H Boeing , M. C Boutron Ruault , J. E Buring , S. J Chanock , S Clipp , J. M Gaziano , E. L Giovannucci , S. E Hankinson , P Hartge , R. N Hoover , D. J Hunter , A Hutchinson , K. B Jacobs , P Kraft , S. M Lynch , J Manjer , J. E Manson , A McTiernan , R. R McWilliams , J. B Mendelsohn , D. S Michaud , D Palli , T. E Rohan , N Slimani , G Thomas , A Tjonneland , G. S Tobias , D Trichopoulos , J Virtamo , B. M Wolpin , K Yu , A Zeleniuch Jacquotte and A. V. Patel
 

Background  Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

Methods  Pooled data were analyzed from the National Cancer Institute Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between prediagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2170 cases and 2209 control subjects. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio as well as conventional BMI categories (underweight, <18.5; normal weight, 18.5-24.9; overweight, 25.0-29.9; obese, 30.0-34.9; and severely obese, ≥35.0). Models were adjusted for potential confounders.

Results  In all of the participants, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest BMI quartile, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.12-1.58; Ptrend < .001). In men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI, 1.04-1.69; Ptrend < .03), and in women it was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.05-1.70; Ptrend = .01). Increased waist to hip ratio was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest quartile, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.31-2.69; Ptrend = .003) but less so in men.

Conclusions  These findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women.

  B Thyagarajan , L. J Smith , R. G Barr , M. D Gross , A Sood , R Kalhan and D. R. Jacobs
  Background:

Systemic inflammation has been associated with reduced lung function. Adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and P-selectin, figure importantly in initiating the inflammatory response. We studied the association between ICAM-1 and P-selectin concentrations and lung function in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.

Methods:

Spirometry testing was conducted at years 5, 10, and 20. ICAM-1 and P-selectin were assayed at year 15.

Results:

Complete data were obtained from 2,455 participants. We first predicted year-20 lung function from year-15 ICAM-1 concentration data. After controlling for race, gender, height, age, physical activity, smoking status, alcohol intake, BMI, and asthma status, all taken at year 15, the year-20 FVC was 164 mL higher (p < 0.0001) and FEV1 was 164 mL higher (p = 0.0003) in the lowest ICAM-1 concentration quartile than the highest ICAM-1 quartile, whereas the FEV1/FVC ratio showed no association (p = 0.25). We then predicted the year-15 ICAM-1 concentration from year-5 lung function and change in lung function (year 10 – year 5). The year-15 ICAM-1 concentration was about 13 ng/mL higher in the lowest vs highest quartile of either the year-5 FVC (p = 0.01) or year-5 FEV1 (p = 0.005). Year-15 ICAM-1 concentration was unrelated to year-5 FEV1/FVC ratio. Greater loss in FVC and FEV1 (year 10 – year 5) also was associated with higher year-15 ICAM-1 concentrations. Associations between P-selectin and lung function followed a similar but weaker pattern to that observed for ICAM-1.

Conclusions:

These data suggest a bidirectional association between circulating adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1 and P-selectin, and pattern of lung function change in adults.

  A. P Reiner , M. D Gross , C. S Carlson , S. J Bielinski , L. A Lange , M Fornage , N. S Jenny , J Walston , R. P Tracy , O. D Williams , D. R Jacobs and D. A. Nickerson
 

Background— The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1 regulates the activity of a number of genes involved in innate immunity, blood coagulation, lipid and glucose transport and metabolism, and cellular detoxification. Common polymorphisms of the HNF-1 gene (HNF1A) were recently associated with plasma C-reactive protein and -glutamyl transferase concentration in middle-aged to older European Americans (EA).

Methods and Results— We assessed whether common variants of HNF1A are associated with C-reactive protein, -glutamyl transferase, and other atherosclerotic and metabolic risk factors, in the large, population-based Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study of healthy young EA (n=2154) and African American (AA; n=2083) adults. The minor alleles of Ile27Leu (rs1169288) and Ser486Asn (rs2464196) were associated with 0.10 to 0.15 standard deviation units lower C-reactive protein and -glutamyl transferase levels in EA. The same HNF1A coding variants were associated with higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, creatinine, and fibrinogen in EA. We replicated the associations between HNF1A coding variants and C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and renal function in a second population-based sample of EA adults 65 years and older from the Cardiovascular Health Study. The HNF1A Ser486Asn and/or Ile27Leu variants were also associated with increased risk of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults and with incident coronary heart disease in Cardiovascular Health Study. The Ile27Leu and Ser486Asn variants were 3-fold less common in AA than in EA. There was little evidence of association between HNF1A genotype and atherosclerosis-related phenotypes in AA.

Conclusions— Common polymorphisms of HNF1A seem to influence multiple phenotypes related to cardiovascular risk in the general population of younger and older EA adults.

 
 
 
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