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Articles by M. Buyinza
Total Records ( 15 ) for M. Buyinza
  M. Buyinza and A. Ntakimanyire
  This study evaluates, using logistic and multiple regression analyses, the socioeconomic factors that influence farmers’ decisions to adopt rotational woodlot technology in the farming systems of Uganda, based on a survey of 120 farmers in Kigorobya sub-county, Hoima district. The analyses demonstrate that farmers make decisions about woodlot technology based on household and field characteristics. The factors that significantly influenced adoption decisions included: gender, tree tenure security, seed supply, contact with extension and research agencies, soil erosion index, size of landholding, fuelwood scarcity and main source of family income. To promote greater adoption of rotational woodlot technology, particular attention should be placed on the use of appropriate socioeconomic characterization, to better target technologies to areas with greater adoption potential.
  M. Buyinza and A. Ntakimanye
  This study evaluates, using logistic and multiple regression analyses, the socio-economic factors that influence farmers’ decisions to adopt rotational woodlot technology in the farming systems of Uganda, based on a household survey carried out between May and December 2004, involving 120 farmers in Kigorobya sub-county, Hoima district. The analyses demonstrate that farmers make decisions about woodlot technology based on the household and field characteristics. The factors that significantly influenced the decision to adopt rotational woodlot technology included: Gender, tree tenure security, seed supply, contact with extension and research agencies, soil erosion index, size of landholding, fuelwood scarcity and main source of family income. To promote greater adoption of rotational woodlot technology, particular attention should be placed on the use of appropriate socioeconomic characterization, to better target technologies to areas with greater adoption potential.
  M. Buyinza
  This study examines the effectiveness of selected policy options for increasing fuelwood supplies or decreasing fuelwood demand in Hoima district, Uganda. On the supply side, a benefit-cost analysis is done on a government sponsored tree farming project. In order to reduce the demand for fuelwood, two demand-side options are considered, namely, introduction of an improved energy-efficient woodstove and the substitution of a kerosene stove for a traditional woodstove. A non-linear dynamic programming model was used to explore the system behaviour of forest degradation. Our results show that tree-farming is one of the possible approaches to increase the supply of fuelwood (energy), while the woodstoves and kerosene substitution are policies that reduce the demand for fuelwood. This helps to alleviate the rural energy shortage and take some pressure off existing protected forest areas. This study does not attempt to analyse the wider energy planning program that would be needed to understand accurately the various alternatives available in Uganda.
  M. Buyinza and M. Nabalegwa
  Despite agriculture being the major sources of highland people’s livelihood in Mbale region, little attention has been paid to their conservation and development. This study explores the socioeconomic impacts of land degradation in the mid-hills of Mt. Elgon catchment, eastern Uganda. The study results show that of about 59, 21, 11, 7, 3 and 2% of the average income contribution to the household economy come from off-farm, livestock, fruits, vegetables, cash and cereal crops respectively. Population densities are, in general, high in these areas and most land, including marginal lands, are under cultivation. Terracing farmland and planting fodder trees on terrace edge and on terrace risers are the traditional farming practices in order to minimize soil erosion and to maintain crop production. Slash and burn activities are continuously being practiced in the on-site for many years. Few farmers adopted soil conservation techniques such as use of mulching, hedgerows, mixed cropping of cereals with legumes and minimum tillage and establishing fruits orchards and vegetables farming. To improve the economic condition of people in the hilly area, there is a need to promote commercialization and diversification of agricultural practices with minimum degradation of natural resources.
  M. Buyinza
  Forest foods are very important for the predominantly rural population surrounding Mt. Elgon National Park, eastern Uganda. The household survey was conducted in Mutushet and Kortek Parishes, Kapchorwa District between June, 2004-October, 2004. Among forest foods, local people consider edible bamboo shoots as the most important product. A study was carried out to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by poor local community in Mutushet village, set up a marketing group to improve its income from edible bamboo products. Initially the group was assisted by a local project with IUCN funding. Women were the key activity implementers. The outcome of the group formation was that village income from selling bamboo shoots increased at least 6 fold. The community has improved its cash income, reduced its debts and reduced its dependency on rain-fed subsistence agriculture. The successful marketing strategy has led to the community showing increased interest in managing its bamboo resources sustainably. The bamboo industry has not received policy support and remains a minor production commodity of no significantly appreciated economic development strategy. Yet evaluations and analysis elsewhere have shown that bamboo and rattan commodities of forest compositions have a high potential of contributing towards local regional development. It is therefore, urged that relevant actions be taken to tap available opportunities such as: articulation of NWTFP, including bamboo in the forest policy and legal actions; creating awareness on potentials of bamboo development and poverty eradication; improving the capacity of bamboo technologies and marketing opportunities; focus on value adding through improved processing of bamboo products and focused development of on-farm bamboo farming for supply of target products.
  M. Buyinza , R. Nalule and P. Byakagaba
  An assessment of the role of land tenure system and choice of extension method on adoption of agroforestry practices was conducted in Kalungu sub-county; Masaka district, Uganda. Questionnaires were administered to 55 randomly selected farmers who practice agroforestry and 5 extension staff members from Vi-Agroforestry Project (VIAP). Chi-square tests (p<0.05) were run to determine the relationships between the farmers’ preferred extension method and their accessibility. The Gamma and Fisher’s tests were also, run to explore the relationship between the most common land tenure system and the preferred extension approach. The most preferred extension methods included group extension (69%) method, individual method (15%) and village meetings (10%), respectively. The radio (2%), field tours (2%) and field days (10%) were the least preferred extension approaches. The decision to adopt agroforestry practice was influenced by land tenure. The 80% of the farmers preferred freehold land tenure system for agroforestry adoption while, few preferred leasehold tenure system (19%). The important policy recommendation made is that farmers should be encouraged to form tree farmers groups in order to access agroforestry extension services.
  M. Buyinza and B. Lusiba
  Several analyses on poverty made since 1977 confirm that an income-based poverty is widespread in Uganda. Poverty in the country exists in a wide variation depending on the rural-urban areas, physiographic regions, gender and tribal ethnic groups. The purpose of this study is to examine poverty based on different household socio-economic variables. It also tries to highlight the source of inequality using decomposition of economic inequality indices in poverty ridden rural areas. The household survey conducted in Nabweya and Bufumbo parishes, Mbale district from April to December, 2007. Out of the total 116 sampled households with more or less similar proportion from each stratum, 60 from Nabweya and 56 from Bufumbo were selected randomly using semi-structured questionnaire. The household level data were collected on various socio-economic aspects and focusing on different sources of income. The results show that based on tribe, the Iteso are deprived in terms of education and landholding and therefore, laboring and agriculture remain the prominent source of income for them. Average income from salaried job is the highest followed by remittance and that from laboring is the lowest. This led to the high concentration of Iteso under third and fourth income quartile (poorer). A share of income from agriculture in total income is the highest and the share from laboring is the lowest. Relative concentration coefficient shows salaried job has both the highest income disequalizing effect (Cj = 1.56 or gi = 1.49) as well as the highest factor inequality weight followed by agriculture. In case of Bufumbo, however, salaried job followed by remittance has the highest income disequalizing effect. Negative values of Relative Concentration Coefficient and factor inequality weight for laboring indicate that income from it has the income equalizing effect. Thus, agricultural promotion in rural areas based on labor demand increasing policies with proper market arrangement for the agricultural produce will be helpful to reduce the income inequality. In addition, regulation regarding working hour and minimal wage rate should be strictly enforced for the welfare of those involved in laboring, which is also the poorest.
  M. Buyinza
  Forests and culture have been intertwined throughout human history. Forest landscapes are formed and are strongly characterized by cultural beliefs and management. This study is an output of a study carried out to investigate the socio-economic factors that influence the performance of community forestry projects in Uganda. The socio-economic analysis was done to evaluate the effect of local participation to the performance of the community forestry projects. This study has provided insights and confirmation that human ecology and household dynamics greatly influence the performance of community forestry projects. The results revealed that the major household socio-economic factors that influence to success or failure of community forestry projects include literacy, major occupation, farm size, annual gross household income, private forest holdings, accessibility to the forest site and source of households earning.
  M. Buyinza , G.N. Nabanoga and H. Luzinda
  With reference to sustaining the mountainous farming systems in eastern Uganda. This study presents some insights into the prime ecological and economic impacts of land degradation in Bunghoko Mutoto ridge of Mt. Elgon watershed, eastern Uganda. The declining forest resources, depleting soil fertility, small fragmented land holdings and intensive use of land to provide for subsistence needs of growing human and animal population, has raised serious concern over sustainability. The study ridge (124 ha) represents typical farming situation in the hilly landscapes of Uganda. Of the total cultivated area of 54 ha, about 80% is cultivated with food crops, 7% cash crops and 3% fruit crops. People depend mainly on agriculture for their livelihood. About 59, 21, 11, 7, 3 and 2% of the average income contribution to the household economy come from off-farm, livestock, fruits, vegetables, cash and cereal crops, respectively. Terracing farmland and planting fodder trees on terrace edge and on terrace risers are the resilient traditional farming practices in order to minimize soil erosion and to maintain crop production. Slash and burn activities are continuously being practiced. Few farmers have adopted soil conservation techniques like use of mulching, hedgerows, mixed cropping of cereals with legumes and minimum tillage and establishing fruits orchards and vegetables farming. It is possible to improve economic condition of people in the area through commercialization and diversification of resilient agricultural practices with minimum degradation of natural resources.
  R. Namubiru and M. Buyinza
  Temperate fruit growing is a new but promising enterprise in the highlands of south-western Uganda. A study was conducted in three sub-counties of Bubare, Muko and Hamurwa of Rubanda county, Kabale district between May and December 2004, to: determine the factors that influence the adoption of Temperate Fruit Tree Management (TFTM) practices and identify the niche and site quality for fruit tree growth. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect data from 60 farmers selected using purposive sampling procedure. The assessment of the niche to grow fruit trees was done by measuring fruit performance as shown by the crown diameter, root collar diameter and tree vigour. Site quality was established by analysis of soil samples for nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, carbon and pH. The results of the logit analysis showed that variables related to resource endowment such as size of landholding, contact with extension service providers and access to credit impact significantly affect the adoption of TFTM practice. Farmers mainly consider soil fertility, tree-crop compatibility, tree maintenance and protection costs when selecting sites and niches to plant fruit trees. Most of the fruits were planted in the orchard and internal boundary and these were the niches where the fruits performed best. The farmers prefer planting fruit trees in the cropland than in the homestead. In the cropland, the temperate and tropical fruits survive best in the orchard, internal boundary and terrace boundaries.
  M. Bukenya , W. Bbale , M. Buyinza and P. Ndemere
  Many agricultural service providers have used group and individual methods to disseminate agroforestry technologies to farmers with varying degree of success. A study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of group and individual extension methods in delivering agroforestry technologies at Vi-Agroforestry project, Masaka district. Questionnaires were administered to nine randomly selected farmers who had received extension services from the project. Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) were used in four villages. In addition, 12 project extension workers were interviewed. Project manuals and reports were also studied. Data were analysed using SPSS computer package and descriptive analysis. A statistical t-test was carried out to assess the influence of group and individual extension methods on farmers` adoption of agroforestry technologies. Group and individual methods were found to have varying degree of success on farmers’ implementation of agroforestry technologies (t = 3.55, p<0.05) from one household to another. In disseminating agroforestry technologies, group methods were found to be the most effective. Many farmers preferred group compared to individual method. Much as group methods were more effective, service providers should sustain both methods in order to address a variety of farmer characteristics.
  M. Buyinza
  The increasing degradation of the natural resource base and the quality of the environment are jeopardizing the livelihoods of millions of Ugandans and threatens the country’s attainment of development targets including the Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP). The purpose of this study was to examine the contributions of environmental incomes to people’s livelihoods and determine the socio-economic factors that influence the household dependency on environmental resources around Mt. Elgon National Park (ENP), eastern Uganda. Data from a household survey conducted in 2005 were analyzed using logistic regression. The results shown a high rate of dependency on environmental resources among the poor people who collect several types of goods from the forest for both direct consumption and trading for their basic livelihoods. However, the rich households with diverse and reliable sources of incomes showed a low environmental resource dependency rate. The study further revealed that several household level factors such as ethnicity, distance of the settlement to the park boundary, age, household size, landholding and, the level of education significantly affect the total income derived from the national park. The important policy implication from this study is that an effective management strategy for national park and forest ecosystem should be consistent with the overall socio-economic development and any policy formulation process should clearly consider the socioeconomic characterization of the households.
  M. Bukenya , W. Bbale and M. Buyinza
  Currently, in Uganda there is no well-defined forestry extension service despite the emphasis in the policy to establish extension services to assist farmers to grow their own trees. Many agricultural service providers have used group and individual methods to disseminate agroforestry technologies to farmers with varying degree of success. A study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of group and individual extension methods in delivering agroforestry technologies at Vi-Agroforestry project, Masaka district. Questionnaires were administered to nine randomly selected farmers who had received extension services from the project. Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) were used in four villages. In addition, twelve project extension workers were interviewed. Project manuals and reports were also studied. Data were analysed using SPSS computer package and descriptive analysis. A statistical t-test was carried out to assess the influence of group and individual extension methods on farmers` adoption of agroforestry technologies. Group and individual methods were found to have varying degree of success on farmers’ implementation of agroforestry technologies (t = 3.55, p<0.05) from one household to another. In disseminating agroforestry technologies, group methods were found to be the most effective. Many farmers preferred group compared to individual method. Much as group methods were more effective, service providers should sustain both methods in order to address a variety of farmer characteristics.
  M. Buyinza and J. Teera
  The vast potential of forests and forest lands as a major resource for development is not yet fully realized in Uganda. This study examines the benefits and costs of selected policy options for increasing fuelwood supplies or decreasing fuelwood demand in Hoima district, Uganda using a non-linear dynamic programming model. Our results show that tree-farming is one of the possible approaches to increase the supply of fuelwood (energy), while the woodstoves and kerosene substitution are policies that reduce the demand for fuelwood. This helps to alleviate the rural energy shortage and take some pressure off existing protected forest areas. The tree cover in the forest areas declined by 6% in the BASE scenario, 4.8% in POPG scenario and 4.7% in TECH scenario, indicating an overall trend of forest degradation in the Hoima district under each of these scenarios. Reductions in the population growth rate, introduction of improved agricultural technology and increase in the prices of major agricultural crops can help slow down the rates of forest decline. This study does not attempt to analyse the wider energy planning program that would be needed to understand accurately the various alternatives available in Uganda.
  A. Kugonza , M. Buyinza and P. Byakagaba
  A study was carried out in Masindi district, north western Uganda to establish the role played by local people in the management of forests outside protected areas and determining local forest resource use and conservation practices. A sample of 160 (98 men and 62 women) respondents was selected from 16 parishes in 4 sub-counties of Masindi district. Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) tools which, included direct interviews and questionnaires were used in data collection. The results obtained from the chi-square (χ2) and cross-tabulations tests suggest that both men and women play an important role in Community-based forest management with varying proportions. Willingness to participate in forestry management is affected by gender, ethnic background and literacy level. Indigenous conservation practices by local communities in different parishes mainly focused on tree growing practices. Community-oriented forest management systems should be an integral part of the national forest plans and therefore, communication linkages should be established between government agencies and user groups such as the rural women and low-income households, who heavily depend on forest resources for their livelihoods.
 
 
 
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