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Articles by M Takeuchi
Total Records ( 3 ) for M Takeuchi
  M. M Sira , T Yoshida , M Takeuchi , Y Kashiwayama , T Futatani , H Kanegane , A Sasahara , Y Ito , M Mizuguchi , T Imanaka and T. Miyawaki
 

Human colostrum contains many bioactive factors that must promote the development of intestinal mucosal immunity in infants. Especially, the presence of certain cytokines such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β or IL-10 has been of great interest for IgA production as a function of mucosal immune response. In the present study, we attempted to investigate whether unidentified factors inducing generation of IgA-producing cells from naive B cells might exist in colostrum. For this purpose, colostrum samples were directly added to a culture consisting of naive B cells and dendritic cells from cord blood and CD40 ligand-transfected L cells, comparing with recombinant IL-10 (rIL-10) and/or rTGF-β. It was noted that most colostrum samples alone were able to induce IgA-secreting cells at higher levels than rIL-10 and/or rTGF-β. IgA-inducing activity of colostrum was abolished by neither anti-neutralizing mAbs against IL-10 nor TGF-β, though partially by anti-IL-6 mAb. We prepared partially purified fractions from both pooled colostrums with and without IgA-inducing activity and comparatively performed quantitative proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. As a result, syntenin-1 was identified as a candidate for IgA-inducing protein in colostrum. Western blot analysis indicated that levels of syntenin-1 in colostrum samples were correlated with their IgA-inducing activities. Moreover, we demonstrated that recombinant syntenin-1 could induce preferentially IgA production from naive B cells. These results suggest that syntenin-1 serves as one of IgA-inducing factors for B cells.

  M Yonemura , N Katsumata , H Hashimoto , S Satake , M Kaneko , Y Kobayashi , A Takashima , Y Kato , M Takeuchi , Y Fujiwara , H Yamamoto and T. Hojo
  Objective

The aim of this study was to assess the non-inferiority of 1 mg to 3 mg granisetron (GRN) injection for the treatment of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) and to evaluate the tolerability of GRN given at 1 mg in Japanese cancer patients.

Methods

Patients with cancer receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy were enrolled in this single-blind randomized controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive GRN at a single dose of 1 or 3 mg. The primary endpoint was the rate of complete protection from emetic events (no vomiting, no retching and no need for rescue medication) during the first 24 h following the initiation of chemotherapy.

Results

There were 89 patients in the 1 mg group and 90 patients in the 3 mg group. Complete protection was achieved in 70 patients (78.7%) in the 1 mg group and 73 (81.1%) patients in the 3 mg group. The one-sided test did not reveal non-inferiority of either dose of GRN to the other at a 5% significance level.

Conclusions

Our data failed to show the non-inferiority of 1 mg of GRN to 3 mg of GRN administered as a single dose. However, the rate of complete protection from nausea and vomiting was similar in the two groups. Given the recommended dosage in the guidelines and the economic need for reduction of medical care expenses in Japan, prophylactic administration of GRN at 1 mg may be an appropriate, alternative treatment for acute CINV in cancer patients.

  K Baba , Y. W Park , T Kaku , R Kaida , M Takeuchi , M Yoshida , Y Hosoo , Y Ojio , T Okuyama , T Taniguchi , Y Ohmiya , T Kondo , Z Shani , O Shoseyov , T Awano , S Serada , N Norioka , S Norioka and T. Hayashi
 

In response to environmental variation, angiosperm trees bend their stems by forming tension wood, which consists of a cellulose-rich G (gelatinous)-layer in the walls of fiber cells and generates abnormal tensile stress in the secondary xylem. We produced transgenic poplar plants overexpressing several endoglycanases to reduce each specific polysaccharide in the cell wall, as the secondary xylem consists of primary and secondary wall layers. When placed horizontally, the basal regions of stems of transgenic poplars overexpressing xyloglucanase alone could not bend upward due to low strain in the tension side of the xylem. In the wild-type plants, xyloglucan was found in the inner surface of G-layers during multiple layering. In situ xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity showed that the incorporation of whole xyloglucan, potentially for wall tightening, began at the inner surface layers S1 and S2 and was retained throughout G-layer development, while the incorporation of xyloglucan heptasaccharide (XXXG) for wall loosening occurred in the primary wall of the expanding zone. We propose that the xyloglucan network is reinforced by XET to form a further connection between wall-bound and secreted xyloglucans in order to withstand the tensile stress created within the cellulose G-layer microfibrils.

 
 
 
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