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Articles by M Sano
Total Records ( 9 ) for M Sano
  N Yoshikawa , M Nagasaki , M Sano , S Tokudome , K Ueno , N Shimizu , S Imoto , S Miyano , M Suematsu , K Fukuda , C Morimoto and H. Tanaka
 

Recent studies have documented various roles of adrenal corticosteroid signaling in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. It is known that glucocorticoids and aldosterone are able to bind glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor, and these ligand-receptor interactions are redundant. It, therefore, has been impossible to delineate how these nuclear receptors couple with corticosteroid ligands and differentially regulate gene expression for operation of their distinct functions in the heart. Here, to particularly define the role of GR in cardiac muscle cells, we applied a ligand-based approach involving the GR-specific agonist cortivazol (CVZ) and the GR antagonist RU-486 and performed microarray analysis using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. We indicated that glucocorticoids appear to be a major determinant of GR-mediated gene expression when compared with aldosterone. Moreover, expression profiles of these genes highlighted numerous roles of glucocorticoids in various aspects of cardiac physiology. At first, we identified that glucocorticoids, via GR, induce mRNA and protein expression of a transcription factor Kruppel-like factor 15 and its downstream target genes, including branched-chain aminotransferase 2, a key enzyme for amino acid catabolism in the muscle. CVZ treatment or overexpression of KLF15 decreased cellular branched-chain amino acid concentrations and introduction of small-interfering RNA against KLF15 cancelled these CVZ actions in cardiomyocytes. Second, glucocorticoid-GR signaling promoted gene expression of the enzymes involved in the prostaglandin biosynthesis, including cyclooxygenase-2 and phospholipase A2 in cardiomyocytes. Together, we may conclude that GR signaling should have distinct roles for maintenance of cardiac function, for example, in amino acid catabolism and prostaglandin biosynthesis in the heart.

  S Kitano , Y Higashimoto , S Harada , M Sano , T Kurata , Y Yamaguchi , M Kunitomo , J Haginaka and S. i. Yamagishi
  Background

Circulating oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) (ox-LDLs) could be a sensitive marker to predict future cardiovascular events. However, a method to evaluate oxidized forms of LDLs systemically in human plasma is not yet established. In this study, we developed a novel and convenient high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for measuring ox-LDL levels in humans.

Methods

Human plasma lipoproteins were separated by a modified HPLC method using a diethylaminoethyl-type anion-exchange gel column with stepwise elution. Ox-LDLs were detected by postcolumn reaction with a regent containing cholesterol esterase and cholesterol oxidase. Particle size of each LDL fraction separated by HPLC was determined in 61 healthy subjects.

Results

Our HPLC method separated LDLs into three fractions, which were designated as LDL-1, LDL-2 and LDL-3, on the basis of their negative charges, with LDL-3 the most strongly retained fraction migrating fastest in the anodic direction, a property that reflects the net negative charge of the molecule. Western blot analysis revealed that apolipoprotein B100 in LDL-3 fraction was the most fragmented and oxidatively modified. When LDLs were oxidized in vitro by Cu2+ or 2,2-azo-bis (2-aminopropane)-2HCl or modified by various aldehydes, all of the LDL fractions migrated at the position of LDL-3. Further, among three fractions, particle size was smallest in LDL-3 fraction.

Conclusion

Here, we developed a convenient HPLC method and identified LDL-3 as oxidized LDL fractions, although ox-LDLs were present in LDL-2 fraction, albeit lesser concentrations than in LDL-3 subfraction. Measuring ox-LDL levels in human plasma by this method may be useful to evaluate atherosclerotic disorders.

  N Katsumata , T Watanabe , H Minami , K Aogi , T Tabei , M Sano , N Masuda , J Andoh , T Ikeda , T Shibata and S. Takashima
 

Background: This randomized, multicenter, phase III trial compared doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide (AC), single-agent docetaxel (D), and an alternating regimen of AC and docetaxel (AC–D) as first-line chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer (MBC).

Patients and methods: Patients with MBC resistant to endocrine therapy were entered in a randomized study to receive either six cycles of AC (doxorubicin 40 mg/m2 plus cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2), D (60 mg/m2), or alternating treatment with AC–D (i.e. three cycles of AC and three cycles of D). Treatment was administered every 3 weeks.

Results: A total of 441 patients were entered in a randomized study. Response rates were 30% for AC, 41% for D, and 35% for AC–D. The median times to treatment failure (TTFs) were 6.4, 6.4, and 6.7 months (one-sided log-rank test, P = 0.13 for AC versus D, P = 0.14 for AC versus AC–D) and median overall survival (OS) was 22.6, 25.7, and 25.0 months (P = 0.09 for AC versus D, P = 0.13 for AC versus AC–D) in the AC, D, and AC–D, respectively.

Conclusion: There was no difference in the TTF among the three arms. However, there was a trend toward a better response and better OS in the D than in the AC.

  J Endo , M Sano , T Katayama , T Hishiki , K Shinmura , S Morizane , T Matsuhashi , Y Katsumata , Y Zhang , H Ito , Y Nagahata , S Marchitti , K Nishimaki , A. M Wolf , H Nakanishi , F Hattori , V Vasiliou , T Adachi , I Ohsawa , R Taguchi , Y Hirabayashi , S Ohta , M Suematsu , S Ogawa and K. Fukuda
 

Rationale: Aldehyde accumulation is regarded as a pathognomonic feature of oxidative stress–associated cardiovascular disease.

Objective: We investigated how the heart compensates for the accelerated accumulation of aldehydes.

Methods and Results: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) has a major role in aldehyde detoxification in the mitochondria, a major source of aldehydes. Transgenic (Tg) mice carrying an Aldh2 gene with a single nucleotide polymorphism (Aldh2*2) were developed. This polymorphism has a dominant-negative effect and the Tg mice exhibited impaired ALDH activity against a broad range of aldehydes. Despite a shift toward the oxidative state in mitochondrial matrices, Aldh2*2 Tg hearts displayed normal left ventricular function by echocardiography and, because of metabolic remodeling, an unexpected tolerance to oxidative stress induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury. Mitochondrial aldehyde stress stimulated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 phosphorylation. Subsequent translational and transcriptional activation of activating transcription factor-4 promoted the expression of enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, ultimately providing precursor amino acids for glutathione biosynthesis. Intracellular glutathione levels were increased 1.37-fold in Aldh2*2 Tg hearts compared with wild-type controls. Heterozygous knockout of Atf4 blunted the increase in intracellular glutathione levels in Aldh2*2 Tg hearts, thereby attenuating the oxidative stress–resistant phenotype. Furthermore, glycolysis and NADPH generation via the pentose phosphate pathway were activated in Aldh2*2 Tg hearts. (NADPH is required for the recycling of oxidized glutathione.)

Conclusions: The findings of the present study indicate that mitochondrial aldehyde stress in the heart induces metabolic remodeling, leading to activation of the glutathione–redox cycle, which confers resistance against acute oxidative stress induced by ischemia/reperfusion.

  S Yuasa , T Onizuka , K Shimoji , Y Ohno , T Kageyama , S. H Yoon , T Egashira , T Seki , H Hashimoto , T Nishiyama , R Kaneda , M Murata , F Hattori , S Makino , M Sano , S Ogawa , O. W. J Prall , R. P Harvey and K. Fukuda
 

Rationale: The transcriptional networks guiding heart development remain poorly understood, despite the identification of several essential cardiac transcription factors.

Objective: To isolate novel cardiac transcription factors, we performed gene chip analysis and found that Zac1, a zinc finger-type transcription factor, was strongly expressed in the developing heart. This study was designed to investigate the molecular and functional role of Zac1 as a cardiac transcription factor.

Methods and Results: Zac1 was strongly expressed in the heart from cardiac crescent stages and in the looping heart showed a chamber-restricted pattern. Zac1 stimulated luciferase reporter constructs driven by ANF, BNP, or MHC promoters. Strong functional synergy was seen between Zac1 and Nkx2-5 on the ANF promoter, which carries adjacent Zac1 and Nkx2-5 DNA-binding sites. Zac1 directly associated with the ANF promoter in vitro and in vivo, and Zac1 and Nkx2-5 physically associated through zinc fingers 5 and 6 in Zac1, and the homeodomain in Nkx2-5. Zac1 is a maternally imprinted gene and is the first such gene found to be involved in heart development. Homozygous and paternally derived heterozygous mice carrying an interruption in the Zac1 locus showed decreased levels of chamber and myofilament genes, increased apoptotic cells, partially penetrant lethality and morphological defects including atrial and ventricular septal defects, and thin ventricular walls.

Conclusions: Zac1 plays an essential role in the cardiac gene regulatory network. Our data provide a potential mechanistic link between Zac1 in cardiogenesis and congenital heart disease manifestations associated with genetic or epigenetic defects in an imprinted gene network.

  K Kinouchi , A Ichihara , M Sano , G. H Sun Wada , Y Wada , A Kurauchi Mito , K Bokuda , T Narita , Y Oshima , M Sakoda , Y Tamai , H Sato , K Fukuda and H. Itoh
 

Rationale: The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR], encoded in ATP6AP2, plays a key role in the activation of local renin-angiotensin system (RAS). A truncated form of (P)RR, termed M8.9, was also found to be associated with the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), implicating a non–RAS-related function of ATP6AP2.

Objective: We investigated the role of (P)RR/ATP6AP2 in murine cardiomyocytes.

Methods and Results: Cardiomyocyte-specific ablation of Atp6ap2 resulted in lethal heart failure; the cardiomyocytes contained RAB7- and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2)-positive multivesicular vacuoles, especially in the perinuclear regions. The myofibrils and mitochondria remained at the cell periphery. Cardiomyocyte death was accompanied by numerous autophagic vacuoles that contained undigested cellular constituents, as a result of impaired autophagic degradation. Notably, ablation of Atp6ap2 selectively suppressed expression of the VO subunits of V-ATPase, resulting in deacidification of the intracellular vesicles. Furthermore, the inhibition of intracellular acidification by treatment with bafilomycin A1 or chloroquine reproduced the phenotype observed for the (P)RR/ATP6AP2-deficient cardiomyocytes.

Conclusions: Genetic ablation of Atp6ap2 created a loss-of-function model for V-ATPase. The gene product of ATP6AP2 is considered to act as in 2 ways: (1) as (P)RR, exerting a RAS-related function; and (2) as the V-ATPase-associated protein, exerting a non–RAS-related function that is essential for cell survival.

 
 
 
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