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Articles by M Lu
Total Records ( 5 ) for M Lu
  T Yoshizaki , S Schenk , T Imamura , J. L Babendure , N Sonoda , E. J Bae , D. Y Oh , M Lu , J. C Milne , C Westphal , G Bandyopadhyay and J. M. Olefsky
 

Chronic inflammation is an important etiology underlying obesity-related disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, and recent findings indicate that the macrophage can be the initiating cell type responsible for this chronic inflammatory state. The mammalian silent information regulator 2 homolog SIRT1 modulates several physiological processes important for life span, and a potential role of SIRT1 in the regulation of insulin sensitivity has been shown. However, with respect to inflammation, the role of SIRT1 in regulating the proinflammatory pathway within macrophages is poorly understood. Here, we show that knockdown of SIRT1 in the mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cell line and in intraperitoneal macrophages broadly activates the JNK and IKK inflammatory pathways and increases LPS-stimulated TNF secretion. Moreover, gene expression profiles reveal that SIRT1 knockdown leads to an increase in inflammatory gene expression. We also demonstrate that SIRT1 activators inhibit LPS-stimulated inflammatory pathways, as well as secretion of TNF, in a SIRT1-dependent manner in RAW264.7 cells and in primary intraperitoneal macrophages. Treatment of Zucker fatty rats with a SIRT1 activator leads to greatly improved glucose tolerance, reduced hyperinsulinemia, and enhanced systemic insulin sensitivity during glucose clamp studies. These in vivo insulin-sensitizing effects were accompanied by a reduction in tissue inflammation markers and a decrease in the adipose tissue macrophage proinflammatory state, fully consistent with the in vitro effects of SIRT1 in macrophages. In conclusion, these results define a novel role for SIRT1 as an important regulator of macrophage inflammatory responses in the context of insulin resistance and raise the possibility that targeting of SIRT1 might be a useful strategy for treating the inflammatory component of metabolic diseases.

  M Lu , D Patsouris , P Li , J Flores Riveros , J. M Frincke , S Watkins , S Schenk and J. M. Olefsky
 

Tissue macrophage inflammatory pathways contribute to obesity-associated insulin resistance. Here, we have examined the efficacy and mechanisms of action of a novel anti-inflammatory compound (HE3286) in vitro and in vivo. In primary murine macrophages, HE3286 attenuates LPS- and TNF-stimulated inflammation. In Zucker diabetic fatty rats, inflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression was downregulated in liver and adipose tissue by HE3286 treatment, as was macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue. In line with reduced inflammation, HE3286 treatment normalized fasting and fed glucose levels, improved glucose tolerance, and enhanced skeletal muscle and liver insulin sensitivity, as assessed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies. In phase 2 clinical trials, HE3286 treatment led to an enhancement in insulin sensitivity in humans. Gluconeogenic capacity was also reduced by HE3286 treatment, as evidenced by a reduced glycemic response during pyruvate tolerance tests and decreased basal hepatic glucose production (HGP) rates. Since serum levels of gluconeogenic substrates were decreased by HE3286, it indicates that the reduction of both intrinsic gluconeogenic capacity and substrate availability contributes to the decrease in HGP. Lipidomic analysis revealed that HE3286 treatment reduced liver cholesterol and triglyceride content, leading to a feedback elevation of LDL receptor and HMG-CoA reductase expression. Accordingly, HE3286 treatment markedly decreased total serum cholesterol. In conclusion, HE3286 is a novel anti-inflammatory compound, which displays both glucose-lowering and cholesterol-lowering effects.

  F Zhou , M Lu , W Wang , Z. P Bian , J. R Zhang and J. J. Zhu
  BACKGROUND:

The emergence of microfluidic immunosensors has provided a promising tool for improving clinical diagnoses. We developed an electrochemical immunoassay for the simultaneous detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and C-reactive protein (CRP), based on microfluidic chips.

METHODS:

The quantitative methodology was based on ELISA in poly(dimethylsiloxane)-gold nanoparticle composite microreactors. CdTe and ZnSe quantum dots were bioconjugated with antibodies for sandwich immunoassay. After the CdTe and ZnSe quantum dots were dissolved, Cd2+ and Zn2+ were detected by square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry to enable the quantification of the 2 biomarkers. The 2 biomarkers were measured in 20 human serum samples by using the proposed method and commercially available methods.

RESULTS:

This immunosensor allowed simultaneous detection of serum cTnI and CRP. The linear range of this assay was between 0.01 and 50 µg/L and 0.5 and 200 µg/L, with the detection limits of approximately 5 amol and approximately 307 amol in 30-µL samples corresponding to cTnI and CRP, respectively. Slopes close to 1 and the correlation coefficient over 0.99 were obtained for both analytes.

CONCLUSIONS:

This strategy demonstrates a proof of principle for the successful integration of microfluidics with electrochemistry that can potentially provide an alternative to protein detection in the clinical laboratory.

  B. J Cox , M Vollmer , O Tamplin , M Lu , S Biechele , M Gertsenstein , C van Campenhout , T Floss , R Kuhn , W Wurst , H Lickert and J. Rossant
 

Mutational screens are an effective means used in the functional annotation of a genome. We present a method for a mutational screen of the mouse X chromosome using gene trap technologies. This method has the potential to screen all of the genes on the X chromosome without establishing mutant animals, as all gene-trapped embryonic stem (ES) cell lines are hemizygous null for mutations on the X chromosome. Based on this method, embryonic morphological phenotypes and expression patterns for 58 genes were assessed, ~10% of all human and mouse syntenic genes on the X chromosome. Of these, 17 are novel embryonic lethal mutations and nine are mutant mouse models of genes associated with genetic disease in humans, including BCOR and PORCN. The rate of lethal mutations is similar to previous mutagenic screens of the autosomes. Interestingly, some genes associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) in humans show lethal phenotypes in mice, suggesting that null mutations cannot be responsible for all cases of XLMR. The entire data set is available via the publicly accessible website (http://xlinkedgenes.ibme.utoronto.ca/).

  M Lu , P Li , J Pferdekamper , W Fan , M Saberi , S Schenk and J. M. Olefsky
 

Recent findings denote an important contribution of macrophage inflammatory pathways in causing obesity-related insulin resistance. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is activated in proinflammatory macrophages and modestly elevated in insulin-responsive tissues. Although the benefits of systemic iNOS inhibition in insulin-resistant models have been demonstrated, the role of macrophage iNOS in metabolic disorders is not clear. In the current work, we used bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to generate mice with myeloid iNOS deficiency [iNOS BMT knockout (KO)]. Interestingly, disruption of iNOS in myeloid cells did not protect mice from high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. When mice were treated with the iNOS inhibitor, N6-(1-Iminoethyl)-L-lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL), we observed a significant and comparable improvement of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in both wild-type and iNOS BMT KO mice. We further demonstrated that absence of iNOS in primary macrophages did not affect acute TLR4 signaling pathways and had only a modest and mixed effect on inflammatory gene expression. With respect to TNF treatment, iNOS KO macrophages showed, if anything, a greater inflammatory response. In summary, we conclude that iNOS inhibition in tissues other than myeloid cells is responsible for the beneficial effects in obesity/insulin resistance.

 
 
 
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