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Articles by M Hirst
Total Records ( 3 ) for M Hirst
  A. S Morrissy , R. D Morin , A Delaney , T Zeng , H McDonald , S Jones , Y Zhao , M Hirst and M. A. Marra
 

We describe a new method, Tag-seq, which employs ultra high-throughput sequencing of 21 base pair cDNA tags for sensitive and cost-effective gene expression profiling. We compared Tag-seq data to LongSAGE data and observed improved representation of several classes of rare transcripts, including transcription factors, antisense transcripts, and intronic sequences, the latter possibly representing novel exons or genes. We observed increases in the diversity, abundance, and dynamic range of such rare transcripts and took advantage of the greater dynamic range of expression to identify, in cancers and normal libraries, altered expression ratios of alternative transcript isoforms. The strand-specific information of Tag-seq reads further allowed us to detect altered expression ratios of sense and antisense (S-AS) transcripts between cancer and normal libraries. S-AS transcripts were enriched in known cancer genes, while transcript isoforms were enriched in miRNA targeting sites. We found that transcript abundance had a stronger GC-bias in LongSAGE than Tag-seq, such that AT-rich tags were less abundant than GC-rich tags in LongSAGE. Tag-seq also performed better in gene discovery, identifying >98% of genes detected by LongSAGE and profiling a distinct subset of the transcriptome characterized by AT-rich genes, which was expressed at levels below those detectable by LongSAGE. Overall, Tag-seq is sensitive to rare transcripts, has less sequence composition bias relative to LongSAGE, and allows differential expression analysis for a greater range of transcripts, including transcripts encoding important regulatory molecules.

  Temple The MGC Project Team , D. S Gerhard , R Rasooly , E. A Feingold , P. J Good , C Robinson , A Mandich , J. G Derge , J Lewis , D Shoaf , F. S Collins , W Jang , L Wagner , C. M Shenmen , L Misquitta , C. F Schaefer , K. H Buetow , T. I Bonner , L Yankie , M Ward , L Phan , A Astashyn , G Brown , C Farrell , J Hart , M Landrum , B. L Maidak , M Murphy , T Murphy , B Rajput , L Riddick , D Webb , J Weber , W Wu , K. D Pruitt , D Maglott , A Siepel , B Brejova , M Diekhans , R Harte , R Baertsch , J Kent , D Haussler , M Brent , L Langton , C. L.G Comstock , M Stevens , C Wei , M. J van Baren , K Salehi Ashtiani , R. R Murray , L Ghamsari , E Mello , C Lin , C Pennacchio , K Schreiber , N Shapiro , A Marsh , E Pardes , T Moore , A Lebeau , M Muratet , B Simmons , D Kloske , S Sieja , J Hudson , P Sethupathy , M Brownstein , N Bhat , J Lazar , H Jacob , C. E Gruber , M. R Smith , J McPherson , A. M Garcia , P. H Gunaratne , J Wu , D Muzny , R. A Gibbs , A. C Young , G. G Bouffard , R. W Blakesley , J Mullikin , E. D Green , M. C Dickson , A. C Rodriguez , J Grimwood , J Schmutz , R. M Myers , M Hirst , T Zeng , K Tse , M Moksa , M Deng , K Ma , D Mah , J Pang , G Taylor , E Chuah , A Deng , K Fichter , A Go , S Lee , J Wang , M Griffith , R Morin , R. A Moore , M Mayo , S Munro , S Wagner , S. J.M Jones , R. A Holt , M. A Marra , S Lu , S Yang , J Hartigan , M Graf , R Wagner , S Letovksy , J. C Pulido , K Robison , D Esposito , J Hartley , V. E Wall , R. F Hopkins , O Ohara and S. Wiemann
 

Since its start, the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) has sought to provide at least one full-protein-coding sequence cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene with a RefSeq transcript, and at least 6200 rat genes. The MGC cloning effort initially relied on random expressed sequence tag screening of cDNA libraries. Here, we summarize our recent progress using directed RT-PCR cloning and DNA synthesis. The MGC now contains clones with the entire protein-coding sequence for 92% of human and 89% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq (NM-accession) transcripts, and for 97% of human and 96% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq transcripts that have one or more PubMed publications, in addition to clones for more than 6300 rat genes. These high-quality MGC clones and their sequences are accessible without restriction to researchers worldwide.

  B. G Hoffman , G Robertson , B Zavaglia , M Beach , R Cullum , S Lee , G Soukhatcheva , L Li , E. D Wederell , N Thiessen , M Bilenky , T Cezard , A Tam , B Kamoh , I Birol , D Dai , Y Zhao , M Hirst , C. B Verchere , C. D Helgason , M. A Marra , S. J. M Jones and P. A. Hoodless
 

The liver and pancreas share a common origin and coexpress several transcription factors. To gain insight into the transcriptional networks regulating the function of these tissues, we globally identify binding sites for FOXA2 in adult mouse islets and liver, PDX1 in islets, and HNF4A in liver. Because most eukaryotic transcription factors bind thousands of loci, many of which are thought to be inactive, methods that can discriminate functionally active binding events are essential for the interpretation of genome-wide transcription factor binding data. To develop such a method, we also generated genome-wide H3K4me1 and H3K4me3 localization data in these tissues. By analyzing our binding and histone methylation data in combination with comprehensive gene expression data, we show that H3K4me1 enrichment profiles discriminate transcription factor occupied loci into three classes: those that are functionally active, those that are poised for activation, and those that reflect pioneer-like transcription factor activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the regulated presence of H3K4me1-marked nucleosomes at transcription factor occupied promoters and enhancers controls their activity, implicating both tissue-specific transcription factor binding and nucleosome remodeling complex recruitment in determining tissue-specific gene expression. Finally, we apply these approaches to generate novel insights into how FOXA2, PDX1, and HNF4A cooperate to drive islet- and liver-specific gene expression.

 
 
 
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