Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by M Hangai
Total Records ( 3 ) for M Hangai
  M Hangai , M Fujimoto and N. Yoshimura
 

Objective  To describe and compare the tomographic features and macular abnormalities of multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) during the disease course.

Methods  In 5 patients (5 eyes) with characteristic MEWDS lesions (hypofluorescent in the late phase of indocyanine green angiography [IA]), results of microperimetric retinal sensitivity examination and IA were compared with findings from enhanced spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) at diagnosis and until clinical resolution.

Results  Enhanced SD-OCT revealed moderately reflective focal lesions within the outer photoreceptor layer, where the inner and outer segment junction was disrupted, that corresponded with hypofluorescent areas in the late phase of IA. Areas of decreased retinal sensitivity on microperimetric examination matched areas of disruption in the inner/outer segment junction on SD-OCT images. In the first month after diagnosis, microperimetric examination and enhanced SD-OCT showed a shift in areas of decreased retinal sensitivity and disruption in the inner/outer segment junction from around the optic disc to the temporal macula. Retinal sensitivity and the inner/outer segment junction returned to almost normal in all eyes about a month after diagnosis of MEWDS.

Conclusion  Enhanced SD-OCT revealed abnormalities in the photoreceptor layer that were specific to MEWDS and that, with retinal shape and function, seemed to change location during clinical recovery from MEWDS.

  H Hirasawa , A Tomidokoro , M Araie , S Konno , H Saito , A Iwase , M Shirakashi , H Abe , S Ohkubo , K Sugiyama , T Ootani , S Kishi , K Matsushita , N Maeda , M Hangai and N. Yoshimura
 

Objectives  To evaluate the peripapillary distribution of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) in normal eyes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and to study potentially related factors.

Methods  In 7 institutes in Japan, RNFLT in 7 concentric peripapillary circles with diameters ranging from 2.2 to 4.0 mm were measured using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in 251 ophthalmologically normal subjects. Multiple regression analysis for the association of RNFLT with sex, age, axial length, and disc area was performed.

Results  Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness decreased linearly from 125 to 89 µm as the measurement diameter increased (P < .001, mixed linear model). Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness correlated with age in all diameters (partial correlation coefficient [PCC] = –0.40 to –0.32; P < .001) and negatively correlated with disc area in the 2 innermost circles but positively correlated in the 3 outermost circles (PCC = –0.30 to –0.22 and 0.17 to 0.20; P ≤ .005). Sex and axial length did not correlate with RNFLT (P > .08). The decay slope was smallest in the temporal and largest in the nasal and inferior quadrants (P < .001); positively correlated with disc area (PCC = 0.13 to 0.51; P ≤ .04); and negatively correlated with RNFLT (PCC = –0.51 to –0.15; P ≤ .01).

Conclusions  In normal Japanese eyes, RNFLT significantly correlated with age and disc area, but not with sex or axial length. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness decreased linearly as the measurement diameter increased. The decay slope of RNFLT was steepest in the nasal and inferior quadrants and steeper in eyes with increased RNFLT or smaller optic discs.

  M Hangai , K Kaneoka , Y Okubo , S Miyakawa , S Hinotsu , N Mukai , M Sakane and N. Ochiai
  Background

Low back pain is a significant problem not only for the adult, but also during youth. However, the relationship between low back pain during youth and the duration or types of competitive sports has not been clarified.

Hypothesis

Low back pain during youth is associated with the duration and types of competitive sports.

Study Design

Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods

Study participants were 4667 new university students who, from 2004 to 2006, answered a questionnaire concerning low back pain and their participation in competitive sports. The participants were divided into a "no" group (NO), a middle group (MID), and a high group (HI) based on the duration of participation in competitive sports. The answers to the questionnaire were analyzed using the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. Furthermore, we selected students who had participated in the same sport for 5 or more years and categorized the students according to the type of sport. Differences in low back pain among the groups were analyzed using logistic regression with the NO group as the reference group.

Results

There were statistically significant linear associations in the NO, MID, and HI groups, with 50.0%, 61.8%, and 71.7%, respectively, of the students experiencing low back pain. Among the NO, MID, and HI groups, 4.4%, 5.7%, 9.6%, respectively, had experienced school absence due to low back pain; and 4.0%, 8.5%, and 14.6%, respectively had low back pain with associated lower extremity pain and numbness. All 8 sports groups that were analyzed had experienced low back pain significantly higher than the NO group, and the odds ratios differed by sport with the highest (3.8) for the volleyball group.

Conclusion

Excessive exposure to competitive sports activities during youth was associated with low back pain and symptoms in the lower extremities, with the severity varying with the sport. To reduce low back pain in youth, factors that may be causing low back pain, such as sport-specific postures and motions, need to be investigated.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility