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Articles by M Anderson
Total Records ( 3 ) for M Anderson
  J. R Asarnow , L. H Jaycox , L Tang , N Duan , A. P LaBorde , L. R Zeledon , M Anderson , P. J Murray , C Landon , M. M Rea and K. B. Wells
 

OBJECTIVE: Quality improvement programs for depressed youths in primary care settings have been shown to improve 6-month clinical outcomes, but longer-term outcomes are unknown. The authors examined 6-, 12-, and 18-month outcomes of a primary care quality improvement intervention. METHOD: Primary care patients 13–21 years of age with current depressive symptoms were randomly assigned to a 6-month quality improvement intervention (N=211) or to treatment as usual enhanced with provider training (N=207). The quality improvement intervention featured expert leader teams to oversee implementation of the intervention; clinical care managers trained in cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression to support patient evaluation and treatment; and support for patient and provider choice of treatments. RESULTS: The quality improvement intervention, relative to enhanced treatment as usual, lowered the likelihood of severe depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale score ≥24) at 6 months; a similar trend at 18 months was not statistically significant. Path analyses revealed a significant indirect intervention effect on long-term depression due to the initial intervention improvement at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomized effectiveness trial of a primary care quality improvement intervention for depressed youths, the main effect of the intervention on outcomes was to decrease the likelihood of severe depression at the 6-month outcome assessment. These early intervention-related improvements conferred additional long-term protection through a favorable shift in illness course through 12 and 18 months.

  K Duxbury , C Romagnoli , M Anderson , R Watts and G. Waite
  Background

The clinical requirements of the users of assay results must be at the centre of assay development. We aimed to develop a single liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for drugs of abuse in urine that would meet the needs of our service users and replace the multiple screening and confirmatory techniques previously in use.

Methods

After discussion with our users, it was decided that 13 drugs and metabolites should be measured in our panel: morphine, codeine, norcodeine, dihydrocodeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, acetyl codeine, methadone and its metabolite, buprenorphine and its metabolite, amphetamine, benzoylecgonine and cotinine. Urine samples were prepared by the addition of internal standard, enzymatic hydrolysis and solid-phase extraction. Chromatography conditions were optimized so that the analytes were separated within a run time of 6 min. Optimal parent to daughter m/z ion transitions were chosen for all drugs and daughter ion ratios were used.

Results

The LC-MS/MS assay was successfully validated with acceptable precision and lower limits of quantification for all drugs. No matrix effects were seen. The results produced by the LC-MS/MS assay compared well with the previous combination of techniques in use.

Conclusions

We have developed and validated a fit-for-purpose LC-MS/MS assay for 13 drugs of abuse in urine that obviates the need for multiple screening and confirmatory analytical techniques.

  N Matigian , G Abrahamsen , R Sutharsan , A. L Cook , A. M Vitale , A Nouwens , B Bellette , J An , M Anderson , A. G Beckhouse , M Bennebroek , R Cecil , A. M Chalk , J Cochrane , Y Fan , F Feron , R McCurdy , J. J McGrath , W Murrell , C Perry , J Raju , S Ravishankar , P. A Silburn , G. T Sutherland , S Mahler , G. D Mellick , S. A Wood , C. M Sue , C. A Wells and A. Mackay Sim
  Nicholas Matigian, Greger Abrahamsen, Ratneswary Sutharsan, Anthony L. Cook, Alejandra M. Vitale, Amanda Nouwens, Bernadette Bellette, Jiyuan An, Matthew Anderson, Anthony G. Beckhouse, Maikel Bennebroek, Rowena Cecil, Alistair M. Chalk, Julie Cochrane, Yongjun Fan, Francois Feron, Richard McCurdy, John J. McGrath, Wayne Murrell, Chris Perry, Jyothy Raju, Sugandha Ravishankar, Peter A. Silburn, Greg T. Sutherland, Stephen Mahler, George D. Mellick, Stephen A. Wood, Carolyn M. Sue, Christine A. Wells, and Alan Mackay-Sim There is a pressing need for patient-derived cell models of brain diseases that are relevant and robust enough to produce the large quantities of cells required for molecular and functional analyses. We describe here a new cell model based on patient-derived cells from the human olfactory mucosa, the organ of smell, which regenerates throughout life from neural stem cells. Olfactory mucosa biopsies were obtained from healthy controls and patients with either schizophrenia, a neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorder, or Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disease. Biopsies were dissociated and grown as neurospheres in defined medium. Neurosphere-derived cell lines were grown in serum-containing medium as adherent monolayers and stored frozen. By comparing 42 patient and control cell lines we demonstrated significant disease-specific alterations in gene expression, protein expression and cell function, including dysregulated neurodevelopmental pathways in schizophrenia and dysregulated mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and xenobiotic metabolism in Parkinson’s disease. The study has identified new candidate genes and cell pathways for future investigation. Fibroblasts from schizophrenia patients did not show these differences. Olfactory neurosphere-derived cells have many advantages over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells as models for brain diseases. They do not require genetic reprogramming and they can be obtained from adults with complex genetic diseases. They will be useful for understanding disease aetiology, for diagnostics and for drug discovery.

 
 
 
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