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Articles by Lori Frank
Total Records ( 2 ) for Lori Frank
  Soo Borson , Lori Frank , Peter J. Bayley , Malaz Boustani , Marge Dean , Pei-Jung Lin , J. Riley McCarten , John C. Morris , David P. Salmon , Frederick A. Schmitt , Richard G. Stefanacci , Marta S. Mendiondo , Susan Peschin , Eric J. Hall , Howard Fillit and J. Wesson Ashford
  The value of screening for cognitive impairment, including dementia and Alzheimer's disease, has been debated for decades. Recent research on causes of and treatments for cognitive impairment has converged to challenge previous thinking about screening for cognitive impairment. Consequently, changes have occurred in health care policies and priorities, including the establishment of the annual wellness visit, which requires detection of any cognitive impairment for Medicare enrollees. In response to these changes, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America and the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation convened a workgroup to review evidence for screening implementation and to evaluate the implications of routine dementia detection for health care redesign. The primary domains reviewed were consideration of the benefits, harms, and impact of cognitive screening on health care quality. In conference, the workgroup developed 10 recommendations for realizing the national policy goals of early detection as the first step in improving clinical care and ensuring proactive, patient-centered management of dementia.
  Leah Kleinman , Jeffrey Lieberman , Sanjay Dube , Richard Mohs , Yang Zhao , Bruce Kinon , William Carpenter , Philip D. Harvey , Michael F. Green , Richard S.E. Keefe , Lori Frank , Lee Bowman and Dennis A. Revicki
  Existing measures for functional assessment do not adequately address the relationship between cognitive impairment and function. The Schizophrenia Outcomes Functioning Interview (SOFI) was developed to measure community functioning related to cognitive impairment and psychopathology.

Following review of existing measures and discussion with experts, caregivers, and patients, content was generated for four domains: 1) living situation; 2) IADLs; 3) productive activities; and 4) social functioning. The final SOFI was constructed with items informing domain scores, and an interviewer-completed global rating for each domain.

Psychometric characteristics of the SOFI were evaluated in a sample of 104 community residing patients with schizophrenia and their informants. Test–retest reliability was evaluated in a sub-sample of patient–informant dyads using ICC; all values were > 0.70 for both patient-interviews (SOFI-P) and informant-interviews (SOFI-I). Inter-rater reliability ICCs ranged from 0.50 to 0.79 on a different sub-sample. The SOFI demonstrated adequate construct validity based on correlations with the PSP (range 0.58 to 0.76; p < 0.0001) and the QLS (p < 0.001). Some correlations between SOFI and PETiT scores were low to moderate (p < 0.05). Discriminant validity was supported based on SOFI score comparisons for patient groups based on PANSS and BACS scores (p < 0.05); SOFI scores differed between borderline and moderately ill patients as measured by the CGI-S (p < 0.05).

The SOFI expands on existing measures and more comprehensively captures functioning of patients in the real world than other performance-based (proxy) measures. The SOFI has good evidence supporting reliability and construct validity, and may be a useful measure of functional outcomes in schizophrenia.

 
 
 
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