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Articles by Lila Joodi
Total Records ( 3 ) for Lila Joodi
  Ghassem Habibi Bibalani , Zia Bazhrang , Hani Mohsenifar and Lila Joodi
  To verify whether or not a pulling effect exists in the root system of Alder (Alnus glutinosa) in the Roudsar, North Iran and to study the importance and size of this effect, a direct in situ test was led at a site in the Chaboksar Forests. The results from the site showed that, in the surface soil (0-30 cm), side roots can provide a pull force of up to 450-860 N (Newtons) over a vertical cross-section area of 20-50 cm2, or an enhance in the pulling stability of the rooted soil by 9.8-52.8%. The test results suggest that, together with the Alder vertical roots, which keep the little depth rooted soil zone to the deep and more stable soil mass, the side roots of the Alder, with their pulling effect, are able to make less against little depth instability in the forest slopes, such as little depth slide, to a certain degree.
  Ghassem Habibi Bibalani , Lila Joodi , Naeimeh Shibaei and Zia Bazhrang
  This study investigates the effects of vegetation on the stability of slopes using the finite element method. Parametric studies were performed to assess the sensitivity of the stability of a slope to the variation in the key vegetation and soil parameters. Results show that vegetation plays an important role in stabilizing shallow-seated failure of slopes and significantly affects stability. As Iran has a long history of landslides, this research deals with the effect of scrubs on slope stability, in particular, the economic interest such as tea and Citrus. It is well understood that vegetation influences slope stability mechanical effects. The shear strength of the soil is increased through the mechanical effects of the plant root matrix system. The density of the roots within the soil mass and the root tensile strength contribute to the ability of the soils to resist shear stress. The effects of soil suction and root reinforcement has been quantified as an increase in apparent soil cohesion. The study was carried out in Roudsar Township in Gilan State of Iran. In this area of 20 ha were considered suitable for the purposes of this study. A large part of the area had slopes of steep gradients on which tea-citrus garden was present. Soil samples were taken from an area of approximately 25 ha large for testing in the laboratory. Direct shear tests were carried out on soil samples and the Factor Of Safety (FOS) calculated. Results showed that the FOS was increased in soils with tea and citrus roots present. The global slope FOS was then determined using Bishop’s method. In this case study minimum FOS assumed 1.3, which corresponds to tea-citrus vegetation with 40-60% crown cover, a soil internal friction angle of 16° and a slope angle of 21 degree.
  Ghassem Habibi Bibalani , Zia Bazhrang , Hani Mohsenifar , Naeime Shibaei and Lila Joodi
  A pulling effect by side roots is one way in which roots help to side in-plane strong of a little depth soil mass. In contrast to the effect of vertically-enlarge roots, whereby soil is strengthened by an increase in its shear strength, the pulling effect strengthens the soil by increasing the tensile strength of the rooted soil zone. To verify whether or not a pulling effect exists in the root system of Prunus avium in the Roudsar, North Iran and to study the importance and size of this effect, a direct in situ test was led at a site in the Chaboksar Forests. The results from the site showed that, in the surface soil (0-30 cm), Side roots can provide a pull force of up to 490-712 N (Newtons) over a vertical cross-section area of 20-50 cm2, or an enhance in the pulling stability of the rooted soil by about 48.1%. The test results suggest that, together with the Prunus avium vertical roots, which keep the little depth rooted soil zone to the deep and more stable soil mass, the side roots of the Prunus avium, with their pulling effect, are able to make less against little depth instability in the forest slopes, such as little depth slide, to a certain degree.
 
 
 
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