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Articles by L. Clancy
Total Records ( 2 ) for L. Clancy
  G. N Connolly , C. M Carpenter , M. J Travers , K. M Cummings , A Hyland , M Mulcahy and L. Clancy
  Introduction

The present study examined indoor air quality in a global sample of smoke-free and smoking-permitted Irish pubs. We hypothesized that levels of respirable suspended particles, an important marker of secondhand smoke, would be significantly lower in smoke-free Irish pubs than in pubs that allowed smoking.

Methods

Indoor air quality was assessed in 128 Irish pubs in 15 countries between 21 January 2004 and 10 March 2006. Air quality was evaluated using an aerosol monitor, which measures the level of fine particle (PM2.5) pollution in the air. A standard measurement protocol was used by data collectors across study sites.

Results

Overall, the level of air pollution inside smoke-free Irish pubs was 93% lower than the level found in pubs where smoking was permitted.

Discussion

Levels of indoor air pollution can be massively reduced by enacting and enforcing smoke-free policies.

  Z Kabir , G.N Connolly , H.K Koh and L. Clancy
 

Background: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) causes a huge economic burden and >80% of COPD cases are attributable to smoking. Massachusetts introduced a comprehensive Tobacco Control Program (MTCP) in January 1993. A trend analysis of COPD hospitalization rates might indirectly reflect the potential impact of such comprehensive tobacco control programs.

Methods: Age-adjusted COPD hospitalization rates/100 000 was abstracted from the Massachusetts Community Health Information Profile Database between 1989 and 2005. Joinpoint Regression Analyses program was employed to estimate annual percent changes (APC) in COPD rates by age, sex and race.

Results: In 1989, 265/100 000 age-adjusted COPD hospitalization rates were reported that increased to 423/100 000 in 1993, and then declined to 329/100 000 in 2005. A significant annual decline of 5.6 percentage points was observed in overall COPD rates from 1993 onwards. A similar temporal pattern, with an age-gradient and a slower annual decline in female COPD rates relative to male COPD rates, was observed. COPD rates in both Blacks and Whites were similar to the general overall pattern. Such consistent annual declines in COPD hospitalization rates from 1993 onwards in Massachusetts also closely correspond to the introduction of the MTCP in January 1993.

Conclusion: The findings indirectly suggest that smoking cessation should remain the cornerstone strategy for the prevention and control of COPD burden. However, additional studies across different population settings are essential for a definitive conclusion with regard to the immediate impact of a comprehensive tobacco control program on COPD hospitalization rates showing possible gender susceptibility.

 
 
 
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