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Articles by L. R Meacham
Total Records ( 3 ) for L. R Meacham
  L. R Meacham , C. A Sklar , S Li , Q Liu , N Gimpel , Y Yasui , J. A Whitton , M Stovall , L. L Robison and K. C. Oeffinger
 

Background  Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality. To further characterize this risk, this study aimed to compare the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in childhood cancer survivors and their siblings.

Methods  Participants included 8599 survivors in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), a retrospectively ascertained North American cohort of long-term survivors who were diagnosed between 1970 and 1986 as well as 2936 randomly selected siblings of the survivors. The main outcome was self-reported DM.

Results  The mean ages of the survivors and the siblings were 31.5 years (age range, 17.0-54.1 years) and 33.4 years (age range, 9.6-58.4 years), respectively. Diabetes mellitus was reported in 2.5% of the survivors and 1.7% of the siblings. After adjustment for body mass index, age, sex, race/ethnicity, household income, and insurance, the survivors were 1.8 times more likely than the siblings to report DM (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-2.5; P < .001), with survivors who received total body irradiation (odds ratio [OR], 12.6; 95% CI, 6.2-25.3; P < .001), abdominal irradiation (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.3-5.0; P < .001), and cranial irradiation (OR, 1.6; 95% CI 1.0-2.3; P = .03) at increased risk. In adjusted models, an increased risk of DM was associated with total body irradiation (OR, 7.2; 95% CI, 3.4-15.0; P < .001), abdominal irradiation (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.9-3.8; P < .001), use of alkylating agents (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3; P < .01), and younger age at diagnosis (0-4 years; OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.6; P < .01).

Conclusion  Childhood cancer survivors treated with total body or abdominal irradiation have an increased risk of diabetes that appears unrelated to body mass index or physical inactivity.

  K Wasilewski Masker , Q Liu , Y Yasui , W Leisenring , L. R Meacham , S Hammond , A. T Meadows , L. L Robison and A. C. Mertens
  Background

An increasing percentage of childhood cancer patients are surviving their disease, but there is limited research on late recurrence. We sought to estimate late recurrence rates for the most common pediatric cancers and to determine risk factors for late recurrence.

Methods

The incidence of late recurrences, or first recurrences that occurred more than 5 years after diagnosis, was analyzed for the most common pediatric cancers using data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a retrospective cohort of 5-year survivors of childhood and adolescent cancers who were diagnosed between 1970 and 1986. A total of 12 795 survivors with no history of recurrence within 5 years after their original cancer diagnosis were included in the analysis, with a total of 217 127 person-years of follow-up. Cumulative incidence of late recurrence at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years after diagnosis was calculated using death as a competing risk. Adjusted relative rates of late recurrence were obtained using multivariable Poisson regression. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Overall, 5-year survivors of pediatric cancers experienced a cumulative incidence of recurrent disease of 4.4%, 5.6%, and 6.2% at 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively. Cumulative incidence varied by diagnosis: Survivors of Ewing sarcoma and astrocytoma had the highest 20-year cumulative incidences at 13.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.4 to 16.5) and 14.4% (95% CI = 12.3 to 16.6), respectively. In multivariable analysis, the greatest risk factors for late recurrence included diagnosis, combination treatment with chemotherapy and radiation, earlier treatment era, and fewer years since diagnosis (P < .001 for all).

Conclusion

Late recurrence is a risk for some pediatric cancers. By understanding diagnosis-specific risks, patients, families, and their medical providers can be better informed of the probability of cure.

 
 
 
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