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Articles by L. A Kane
Total Records ( 3 ) for L. A Kane
  L. A Kane , M. J Youngman , R. E Jensen and J. E. Van Eyk
 

Rationale: We previously discovered several phosphorylations to the β subunit of the mitochondrial F1Fo ATP synthase complex in isolated rabbit myocytes on adenosine treatment, an agent that induces cardioprotection. The role of these phosphorylations is unknown.

Objective: The present study focuses on the functional consequences of phosphorylation of the ATP synthase complex β subunit by generating nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic analogs in a model system, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Methods and Results: The 4 amino acid residues with homology in yeast (T58, S213, T262, and T318) were studied with respect to growth, complex and supercomplex formation, and enzymatic activity (ATPase rate). The most striking mutant was the T262 site, for which the phosphomimetic (T262E) abolished activity, whereas the nonphosphorylatable strain (T262A) had an ATPase rate equivalent to wild type. Although T262E, like all of the β subunit mutants, was able to form the intact complex (F1Fo), this strain lacked a free F1 component found in wild-type and had a corresponding increase of lower-molecular-weight forms of the protein, indicating an assembly/stability defect. In addition, the ATPase activity was reduced but not abolished with the phosphomimetic mutation at T58, a site that altered the formation/maintenance of dimers of the F1Fo ATP synthase complex.

Conclusions: Taken together, these data show that pseudophosphorylation of specific amino acid residues can have separate and distinctive effects on the F1Fo ATP synthase complex, suggesting the possibility that several of the phosphorylations observed in the rabbit heart can have structural and functional consequences to the F1Fo ATP synthase complex.

  G Agnetti , N Kaludercic , L. A Kane , S. T Elliott , Y Guo , K Chakir , D Samantapudi , N Paolocci , G. F Tomaselli , D. A Kass and J. E. Van Eyk
 

Background— Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves chamber mechanoenergetics and morbidity and mortality of patients manifesting heart failure with ventricular dyssynchrony; however, little is known about the molecular changes underlying CRT benefits. We hypothesized that mitochondria may play an important role because of their involvement in energy production.

Methods and Results— Mitochondria isolated from the left ventricle in a canine model of dyssynchronous or resynchronized (CRT) heart failure were analyzed by a classical, gel-based, proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that 31 mitochondrial proteins where changed when controlling the false discovery rate at 30%. Key enzymes in anaplerotic pathways, such as pyruvate carboxylation and branched-chain amino acid oxidation, were increased. These concerted changes, along with others, suggested that CRT may increase the pool of Krebs cycle intermediates and fuel oxidative phosphorylation. Nearly 50% of observed changes pertained to subunits of the respiratory chain. ATP synthase-β subunit of complex V was less degraded, and its phosphorylation modulated by CRT was associated with increased formation (2-fold, P=0.004) and specific activity (+20%, P=0.05) of the mature complex. The importance of these modifications was supported by coordinated changes in mitochondrial chaperones and proteases. CRT increased the mitochondrial respiratory control index with tightened coupling when isolated mitochondria were reexposed to substrates for both complex I (glutamate and malate) and complex II (succinate), an effect likely related to ATP synthase subunit modifications and complex quantity and activity.

Conclusions— CRT potently affects both the mitochondrial proteome and the performance associated with improved cardiac function.

  S. M Jin , M Lazarou , C Wang , L. A Kane , D. P Narendra and R. J. Youle
 

PINK1 is a mitochondrial kinase mutated in some familial cases of Parkinson’s disease. It has been found to work in the same pathway as the E3 ligase Parkin in the maintenance of flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and to recruit cytosolic Parkin to mitochondria to mediate mitophagy in mammalian cells. Although PINK1 has a predicted mitochondrial import sequence, its cellular and submitochondrial localization remains unclear in part because it is rapidly degraded. In this study, we report that the mitochondrial inner membrane rhomboid protease presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protein (PARL) mediates cleavage of PINK1 dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential. In the absence of PARL, the constitutive degradation of PINK1 is inhibited, stabilizing a 60-kD form inside mitochondria. When mitochondrial membrane potential is dissipated, PINK1 accumulates as a 63-kD full-length form on the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it can recruit Parkin to impaired mitochondria. Thus, differential localization to the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes appears to regulate PINK1 stability and function.

 
 
 
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