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Articles by L Wallentin
Total Records ( 3 ) for L Wallentin
  K Szummer , P Lundman , S. H Jacobson , S Schon , J Lindback , U Stenestrand , L Wallentin , T Jernberg and for SWEDEHEART
 

Background— It is unknown whether patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction derive a similar benefit from an early invasive therapy at different levels of renal function.

Methods and Results— A total of 23 262 consecutive non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients ≤80 years old were included in a nationwide coronary care unit register between 2003 and 2006. Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated with the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study formula. Patients were divided into medically or invasively treated groups if revascularized within 14 days of admission. A propensity score for the likelihood of invasive therapy was calculated. A Cox regression model with adjustment for propensity score and discharge medication was used to assess the association between early revascularization and 1-year mortality across renal function stages. There was a gradient, with significantly fewer patients treated invasively with declining renal function: eGFR ≥90 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m–2, 62%; eGFR 60 to 89 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m–2, 55%; eGFR 30 to 59 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m–2, 36%; eGFR 15 to 29 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m–2, 14%; and eGFR <15 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m–2/dialysis, 15% (P<0.001). After adjustment, the overall 1-year mortality was 36% lower (hazard ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.56 to 0.73, P<0.001) with an invasive strategy. The magnitude of survival difference was similar in normal-to-moderate renal function groups. The lower mortality observed with invasive therapy declined with lower renal function, with no difference in mortality in patients with kidney failure (eGFR <15 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m–2) or in those receiving dialysis (hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 3.09, P=0.15).

Conclusions— Early invasive therapy is associated with greater 1-year survival in patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and mild-to-moderate renal insufficiency, but the benefit declines with lower renal function, and is less certain in those with renal failure or on dialysis.

  P. G Steg , S James , R. A Harrington , D Ardissino , R. C Becker , C. P Cannon , H Emanuelsson , A Finkelstein , S Husted , H Katus , J Kilhamn , S Olofsson , R. F Storey , W. D Weaver , L Wallentin and for the PLATO Study Group
  Background—

Aspirin and clopidogrel are recommended for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) or undergoing coronary stenting. Ticagrelor, a reversible oral P2Y12-receptor antagonist, provides faster, greater, and more consistent platelet inhibition than clopidogrel and may be useful for patients with acute ST-segment elevation (STE) ACS and planned primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

Methods and Result—

Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO), a randomized, double-blind trial, compared ticagrelor with clopidogrel for the prevention of vascular events in 18 624 ACS patients. This report concerns the 7544 ACS patients with STE or left bundle-branch block allocated to either ticagrelor 180-mg loading dose followed by 90 mg twice daily or clopidogrel 300-mg loading dose (with provision for 300 mg clopidogrel at percutaneous coronary intervention) followed by 75 mg daily for 6 to 12 months. The reduction of the primary end point (myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death) with ticagrelor versus clopidogrel (10.8% versus 9.4%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 1.01; P=0.07) was consistent with the overall PLATO results. There was no interaction between presentation with STE/left bundle-branch block and randomized treatment (interaction P=0.29). Ticagrelor reduced several secondary end points, including myocardial infarction alone (HR, 0.80; P=0.03), total mortality (HR, 0.82; P=0.05), and definite stent thrombosis (HR, 0.66; P=0.03). The risk of stroke, low in both groups, was higher with ticagrelor (1.7% versus 1.0%; HR,1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 2.48; P=0.02). Ticagrelor did not affect major bleeding (HR, 0.98; P=0.76).

Conclusion—

In patients with STE-ACS and planned primary percutaneous coronary intervention, the effects of ticagrelor were consistent with those observed in the overall PLATO trial.

Clinical Trial Registration—

URL: http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00391872.

  D. M Charytan , L Wallentin , B Lagerqvist , R Spacek , R. J De Winter , N. M Stern , E Braunwald , C. P Cannon and N. K. Choudhry
 

Background and objectives: In the general population, an early invasive strategy of routine coronary angiography is superior to a conservative strategy of selective angiography in patients who are admitted with unstable angina or non–ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI), but the effectiveness of this strategy in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is uncertain.

Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We conducted a collaborative meta-analysis with data provided by the main authors of identified trials to estimate the effectiveness of early angiography in patients with CKD. The Cochrane, Medline, and EMBASE databases were searched to identify randomized trials that compared invasive and conservative strategies in patients with unstable angina or non-ST MI. Pooled risks ratios were estimated using data from enrolled patients with estimated GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2.

Results: Five randomized trials that enrolled 1453 patients with CKD were included. An early invasive strategy was associated with nonsignificant reductions in all-cause mortality, nonfatal MI, and a composite of death or nonfatal MI. The invasive strategy significantly reduced rehospitalization.

Conclusions: This collaborative study suggests that the benefits of an early invasive strategy are preserved in patients with CKD and that an early invasive approach reduces the risk for rehospitalization and is associated with trends of reduction in the risk for death and nonfatal re-infarction in patients with CKD. Coronary angiography should be considered for patients who have CKD and are admitted with non–ST elevation acute coronary syndromes.

 
 
 
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