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Articles by L Qiao
Total Records ( 4 ) for L Qiao
  Y Dai , L Qiao , K. W Chan , M Yang , J Ye , J Ma , B Zou , Q Gu , J Wang , R Pang , H.Y Lan and B. C.Y. Wong
 

Down-regulation of XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) sensitizes colon cancer cells to the anticancer effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR) ligands in mice. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of embelin (2,5-dihydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-benzoquinone), an antagonist of XIAP, on colon cancer, with a particular focus on whether PPAR is required for embelin to exert its effect. A dominant-negative PPAR was used to antagonize endogenous PPAR in HCT116 cells. Cells were treated with or without embelin. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and nuclear factor-B (NF-B) activity were measured. For in vivo studies, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) was s.c. injected to induce colon cancer in PPAR+/+ and PPAR+/– mice. Mice were fed embelin daily for 10 days before DMH injection, and continued for 30 more weeks. Embelin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells with marked up-regulation of PPAR. In addition, embelin significantly inhibited the expressions of survivin, cyclin D1, and c-Myc. These effects were partially dependent on PPAR. PPAR+/– mice were more susceptible to DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis than PPAR+/+ mice, and embelin significantly reduced the incidence of colon cancer in PPAR+/+ mice but not in PPAR+/– mice. Embelin inhibited NF-B activity in PPAR+/+ mice but marginally so in PPAR+/– mice. Thus, reduced expression of PPAR significantly sensitizes colonic tissues to the carcinogenic effect of DMH. Embelin inhibits chemical carcinogen-induced colon carcinogenesis, but this effect is partially dependent on the presence of functional PPAR, indicating that PPAR is a necessary signaling pathway involved in the antitumor activity of normal organisms. [Cancer Res 2009;69(11):4776–83]

  J Wang , Q Gu , M Li , W Zhang , M Yang , B Zou , S Chan , L Qiao , B Jiang , S Tu , J Ma , I. F Hung , H. Y Lan and B. C.Y. Wong
 

Background and aims: X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis-associated factor 1 (XAF1) was first recognized as an antagonist of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in suppressing caspase 3 activity. It has lower expression in cancer cells than normal tissue. Overexpression of XAF1 can inhibit cancer cell growth and sensitize tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand- or etoposide-induced apoptosis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of XAF1 in regulating cell growth. Methods: Stable transfectants of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer cell lines AGS and SW1116 expressing XAF1 and vector control were generated. Cell growth, apoptosis, mitotic status and cell cycle distribution were assessed. The interaction between XAF1 and G2/M checkpoint proteins was evaluated by immunoblotting, kinase assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. Mitotic catastrophe was identified by occurrence of aberrant nuclei and centrosomal amplification. Results: Our results showed that overexpression of XAF1 suppressed serum-dependent cancer cell growth, induced mitotic catastrophe and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Interestingly, XAF1 was predominantly expressed in G2/M phase after cell cycle synchronization. XAF1 interacted with and activated checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), inactivated Cdc25C and lead to inactivation of Cdc2–cyclin B complex. Suppression of Chk1 abrogated XAF1-induced G2/M arrest. Conclusions: Our findings implicate XAF1 as a novel cell cycle modulator that is recruited in G2/M phase and thus unravel a novel function pathway of XAF1, suggesting the potential role of XAF1 as the target for the management of GI cancers.

  L Qiao and B. C.Y. Wong
 

Notch signaling is an important molecular pathway involved in the determination of cell fate. In recent years, this signaling has been frequently reported to play a critical role in maintaining progenitor/stem cell population as well as a balance between cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Thus, Notch signaling may be mechanistically involved carcinogenesis. Indeed, many studies have showed that Notch signaling is overexpressed or constitutively activated in many cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Consequently, inactivation of Notch signaling may constitute a novel molecular therapy for cancer. CRC is one of the most common malignancies but the current therapeutic approaches for advanced CRC are less efficient. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches are badly needed. In this review article, the authors reviewed the current understanding and research findings of the role of Notch signaling in CRC and discussed the possible Notch-targeting approaches in CRC.

 
 
 
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