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Articles by L Marodi
Total Records ( 3 ) for L Marodi
  M Biegstraaten , E Mengel , L Marodi , M Petakov , C Niederau , P Giraldo , D Hughes , M Mrsic , A Mehta , C. E. M Hollak and I. N. van Schaik
 

Type 1 Gaucher disease is currently categorized as non-neuronopathic, although recent studies suggest peripheral neurological manifestations. We report prevalence and incidence data for peripheral neuropathy and associated conditions from a multinational, prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease, either untreated or receiving enzyme replacement therapy. The primary outcome parameters were the prevalence and incidence of polyneuropathy, evaluated by standardized assessments of neurological symptoms and signs, and electrophysiological studies. All diagnoses of polyneuropathy were adjudicated centrally. Secondary outcome parameters included the prevalence and incidence of mononeuropathy, other neurological or electrophysiological abnormalities not fulfilling the criteria for a mono- or polyneuropathy and general type 1 Gaucher disease symptoms. Furthermore, a literature search was performed to identify all studies reporting on prevalence and incidence of polyneuropathy in the general population. One hundred and three patients were enrolled [median (range) age: 42 (18–75) years; disease duration: 15 (0–56) years; 52% female]; 14 (13.6%) were untreated and 89 (86.4%) were on enzyme replacement therapy. At baseline, 11 patients [10.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.9–18.3] were diagnosed with sensory motor axonal polyneuropathy. Two (1.9%; 95% CI: 0.1–7.2) had a mononeuropathy of the ulnar nerve. The 2-year follow-up period revealed another six cases of polyneuropathy (2.9 per 100 person-years; 95% CI: 1.2–6.3). Patients with polyneuropathy were older than those without (P < 0.001). Conditions possibly associated with polyneuropathy were identified in four patients only, being monoclonal gammopathy, vitamin B1 deficiency, folic acid deficiency, type 2 diabetes mellitus, renal insufficiency, alcohol abuse and exposure to toxins related to profession. The 11 cases of polyneuropathy found at baseline were confirmed during follow-up. According to the literature, the prevalence of polyneuropathy in the general population was estimated between 0.09 and 1.3% and the incidence was estimated between 0.0046 and 0.015 per 100 person-years. Thus, we conclude that the prevalence and incidence of polyneuropathy in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease is increased compared with the general population.

  C Wanner , J. P Oliveira , A Ortiz , M Mauer , D. P Germain , G. E Linthorst , A. L Serra , L Marodi , R Mignani , B Cianciaruso , B Vujkovac , R Lemay , D Beitner Johnson , S Waldek and D. G. Warnock
 

Background and objectives: These analyses were designed to characterize renal disease progression in untreated adults with Fabry disease.

Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Data from the Fabry Registry for 462 untreated adults (121 men and 341 women) who had at least two estimated GFR (eGFR) values over a span of ≥12 months before starting enzyme replacement therapy were included.

Results: Most men (86 of 121, 71%) had more rapid loss of kidney function than the normal adult population (loss of eGFR > –1 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year), whereas fewer women (133 of 341, 39%) had rapid loss of kidney function. Patients with rapid progression had significantly higher mean averaged urinary protein to urinary creatinine ratios (UP/Cr) than patients with slower progression (1.5 versus 0.2 for men; 1.4 versus 0.5 for women; P < 0.0001). Patients were grouped into quartiles based on averaged UP/Cr; renal function in men declined more rapidly with higher UP/Cr, with the steepest declines observed in men with UP/Cr > 1.5 (mean eGFR slope, –5.6 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year; n = 30). eGFR slope declined more slowly in women, with the steepest declines observed in women with UP/Cr > 1.2 (mean eGFR slope, –1.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year; n = 85). Regression models of eGFR slope indicated that UP/Cr is the most important indicator of renal disease progression in adult Fabry patients. In women, lower baseline eGFR and age were also associated with renal disease progression. Women who had clinical events had more rapid loss of kidney function.

Conclusions: Urinary protein excretion is strongly associated with renal disease progression in men and women with Fabry disease.

  A Puel , R Doffinger , A Natividad , M Chrabieh , G Barcenas Morales , C Picard , A Cobat , M Ouachee Chardin , A Toulon , J Bustamante , S Al Muhsen , M Al Owain , P. D Arkwright , C Costigan , V McConnell , A. J Cant , M Abinun , M Polak , P. F Bougneres , D Kumararatne , L Marodi , A Nahum , C Roifman , S Blanche , A Fischer , C Bodemer , L Abel , D Lilic and J. L. Casanova
 

Most patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS-I) display chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). We hypothesized that this CMC might result from autoimmunity to interleukin (IL)-17 cytokines. We found high titers of autoantibodies (auto-Abs) against IL-17A, IL-17F, and/or IL-22 in the sera of all 33 patients tested, as detected by multiplex particle-based flow cytometry. The auto-Abs against IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 were specific in the five patients tested, as shown by Western blotting. The auto-Abs against IL-17A were neutralizing in the only patient tested, as shown by bioassays of IL-17A activity. None of the 37 healthy controls and none of the 103 patients with other autoimmune disorders tested had such auto-Abs. None of the patients with APS-I had auto-Abs against cytokines previously shown to cause other well-defined clinical syndromes in other patients (IL-6, interferon [IFN]-, or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor) or against other cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, IL-18, IL-21, IL-23, IL-26, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor [], or transforming growth factor β). These findings suggest that auto-Abs against IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 may cause CMC in patients with APS-I.

 
 
 
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