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Articles by L Liang
Total Records ( 5 ) for L Liang
  T. Y Wang , G. C Fonarow , A. F Hernandez , L Liang , G Ellrodt , B. K Nallamothu , B. R Shah , C. P Cannon and E. D. Peterson
 

Background  Recent initiatives have focused on reducing door-to-balloon (DTB) times among patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. However, DTB time is only one of several important AMI care processes. It is unclear whether quality efforts targeted to a single process will facilitate concomitant improvement in other quality measures and outcomes.

Methods  This study examined 101 hospitals (43 678 patients with AMI) in the Get With the Guidelines program. For each hospital, DTB time improvement from 2005 to 2007 was correlated with changes in composite Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services/Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (CMS/JCAHO) core measure performance and in-hospital mortality.

Results  Between 2005 and 2007, hospital geometric mean DTB time decreased from 101 to 87 minutes (P < .001). Mean overall hospital composite CMS/JCAHO core measure performance increased from 93.4% to 96.4% (P < .001), and mortality rates were 5.1% and 4.7% (P = .09) in the early and late periods, respectively. Improvement in hospital DTB time, however, was not significantly correlated with changes in composite quality performance (r = –0.06; P = .55) or with in-hospital mortality (r = 0.06; P = .58). After adjustment for patient mix, hospitals with the most improvement in DTB time did not have significantly greater improvements in either CMS/JCAHO measure performance or mortality.

Conclusions  Within the Get With the Guidelines program, DTB times decreased significantly over time. However, there was minimal correlation between DTB time improvement and changes in other quality measures or mortality. These results emphasize the important need for comprehensive acute myocardial infarction quality-improvement efforts, rather than focusing on single process measures.

  L Liang , H Sheha and S. C. G. Tseng
 

Objective  To determine the long-term outcomes of keratolimbal allograft (KLAL).

Methods  Scores of such risks as infrequent blinking, blink-related microtrauma, conjunctival inflammation, elevated intraocular pressure, dry eye, symblepharon, lagophthalmos, and previous KLAL or penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) failure were calculated and recorded before, during, and after KLAL. Prolonged oral mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus and short-term prednisone and acyclovir were administered in 12 eyes (10 consecutive patients) with total limbal stem cell deficiency after KLAL. Ten eyes underwent subsequent PKP.

Results  More corrective measures were required in eyes with higher risk scores. During a follow-up of 61.2 months (standard deviation [SD], 18.2; range, 36-91 months) after KLAL, postoperative epithelial breakdown due to exposure occurred late in the period after PKP and remained a primary risk. Mean daily doses of 1.4 g of mycophenolate mofetil and 1.6 mg of tacrolimus were administered for 52.7 months (SD, 22.5; range, 23-91 months) with few adverse effects and reached trough levels of 1.6 µg/mL (SD, 0.6 µg/mL) and 4.5 ng/mL (SD, 2 ng/mL), respectively. Keratolimbal allograft and PKP rejection was noted in 2 and 3 eyes, respectively, though there was a reversal in 1 eye in each group, yielding final KLAL and PKP survivals in 10 and 8 eyes, respectively, and ambulatory visual acuity of up to 20/20 in 10 eyes for 67.2% of the entire follow-up period.

Conclusion  Correction of ocular surface deficits combined with an immunosuppressive regimen further improves the long-term outcome of KLAL in eyes with total limbal stem cell deficiency.

  P. N Peterson , J. S Rumsfeld , L Liang , N. M Albert , A. F Hernandez , E. D Peterson , G. C Fonarow , F. A Masoudi and on behalf of the American Heart Association Get With the Guidelines Heart Failure Program
 

Background— Effective risk stratification can inform clinical decision-making. Our objective was to derive and validate a risk score for in-hospital mortality in patients hospitalized with heart failure using American Heart Association Get With the Guidelines–Heart Failure (GWTG-HF) program data.

Methods and Results— A cohort of 39 783 patients admitted January 1, 2005, to June 26, 2007, to 198 hospitals participating in GWTG-HF was divided into derivation (70%, n=27 850) and validation (30%, n=11 933) samples. Multivariable logistic regression identified predictors of in-hospital mortality in the derivation sample from candidate demographic, medical history, and laboratory variables collected at admission. In-hospital mortality rate was 2.86% (n=1139). Age, systolic blood pressure, blood urea nitrogen, heart rate, sodium, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and nonblack race were predictive of in-hospital mortality. The model had good discrimination in the derivation and validation datasets (c-index, 0.75 in each). Effect estimates from the entire sample were used to generate a mortality risk score. The predicted probability of in-hospital mortality varied more than 24-fold across deciles (range, 0.4% to 9.7%) and corresponded with observed mortality rates. The model had the same operating characteristics among those with preserved and impaired left ventricular systolic function. The morality risk score can be calculated on the Web-based calculator available with the GWTG-HF data entry tool.

Conclusions— The GWTG-HF risk score uses commonly available clinical variables to predict in-hospital mortality and provides clinicians with a validated tool for risk stratification that is applicable to a broad spectrum of patients with heart failure, including those with preserved left ventricular systolic function.

  P. N Peterson , J. S Rumsfeld , L Liang , A. F Hernandez , E. D Peterson , G. C Fonarow , F. A Masoudi and on behalf of the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines Heart Failure Program
 

Background— Although the absolute benefits of an intervention are proportional to patients’ underlying risk, studies in heart failure have noted a paradoxical inverse relationship between treatment and risk. The extent to which this reflects higher rates of contraindications in patients with higher risk or larger gaps in care quality has not been explored.

Methods and Results— We studied 18 307 patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction surviving hospitalization between January 2005 and June 2007 from 194 hospitals participating in Get With The Guidelines (GWTG)–Heart Failure. Patients were categorized according to their estimated risk for in-hospital mortality using a validated risk score. The proportions of patients with documented contraindications to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and β-blockers as well as the use of these medications among patients without contraindications at hospital discharge was determined across levels of risk. For each therapy, the proportion of patients with contraindications was significantly higher with increasing patient risk (P<0.001 for each). Even after excluding those with contraindications, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and β-blockers was significantly lower with increasing risk (P<0.001 for each).

Conclusions— The use of evidence-based therapies is lower in patients with heart failure at higher risk of mortality both because of higher rates of contraindications to therapy and lower rates of use among eligible patients. Optimizing heart failure outcomes will require both the expansion of the evidence base for treating the highest-risk patients as well as the development of effective strategies to assure that eligible high-risk patients receive all appropriate therapies.

 
 
 
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