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Articles by L Le Marchand
Total Records ( 7 ) for L Le Marchand
  I Cheng , D. O Stram , N. P Burtt , L Gianniny , R. R Garcia , L Pooler , B. E Henderson , L Le Marchand and C. A. Haiman
 

IGF2R has been proposed to be a tumor suppressor gene given its antagonist role on cellular growth and evidence of loss of heterozygosity in several cancers, including breast cancer. To investigate whether inherited differences in potentially functional IGF2R variants influence the risk of breast cancer, we sequenced 46 exons of IGF2R to identify novel missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and tested 12 missense SNPs for their associations with breast cancer risk among 1,614 breast cancer cases and 1,960 controls from the Multiethnic Cohort. None of these missense SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk. Our findings provide no evidence that missense SNPs in IGF2R influence breast cancer susceptibility.(Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(6):1922–4)

  M. T Goodman , Y. B Shvetsov , L. R Wilkens , A. A Franke , L Le Marchand , K. K Kakazu , A. M.Y Nomura , B. E Henderson and L. N. Kolonel
 

The objective of this study was to examine the association of urinary phytoestrogens with the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Participants in the Multiethnic Cohort Study included 36,458 postmenopausal women who provided blood or urine specimens. A nested case-control study of breast cancer with biospecimens was created in which cases diagnosed after specimen collection were matched to two controls. Two hundred fifty-one women with breast cancer and 462 controls had urine available for analysis of urinary phytoestrogens. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using conditional logistic regression. A nonmonotonic inverse trend (P = 0.04) in breast cancer risk was associated with increasing urinary excretion of genistein (OR 25th-75th percentile, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78-0.99) and total isoflavones (OR 25th-75th percentile, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65-0.99). A significant reduction in breast cancer risk in Japanese-American women was associated with the highest compared with the lowest quartile excretion of urinary daidzein (OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.19-0.89; Ptrend, 0.005). The risk of breast cancer was reduced among White women with the highest compared with the lowest quartile excretion of equol (OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.08-0.95), although the trend in risk was not significant (P = 0.07). Our results provide some support to the hypothesis that a diet rich in isoflavones from soy products reduces the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, particularly in populations with comparatively high excretion of phytoestrogens.

  L Dossus , R Kaaks , F Canzian , D Albanes , S. I Berndt , H Boeing , J Buring , S. J Chanock , F Clavel Chapelon , H. S Feigelson , J. M Gaziano , E Giovannucci , C Gonzalez , C. A Haiman , G Hallmans , S. E Hankinson , R. B Hayes , B. E Henderson , R. N Hoover , D. J Hunter , K. T Khaw , L. N Kolonel , P Kraft , J Ma , L Le Marchand , E Lund , P. H.M Peeters , M Stampfer , D. O Stram , G Thomas , M. J Thun , A Tjonneland , D Trichopoulos , R Tumino , E Riboli , J Virtamo , S. J Weinstein , M Yeager , R. G Ziegler and D. G. Cox
 

Genes involved in the inflammation pathway have been associated with cancer risk. Genetic variants in the interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2, encoding for the COX-2 enzyme) genes, in particular, have been related to several cancer types, including breast and prostate cancers. We conducted a study within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium to examine the association between IL6 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and breast and prostate cancer risk. Twenty-seven polymorphisms, selected by pairwise tagging, were genotyped on 6292 breast cancer cases and 8135 matched controls and 8008 prostate cancer cases and 8604 matched controls. The large sample sizes and comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism tagging in this study gave us excellent power to detect modest effects for common variants. After adjustment for multiple testing, none of the associations examined remained statistically significant at P = 0.01. In analyses not adjusted for multiple testing, one IL6 polymorphism (rs6949149) was marginally associated with breast cancer risk (TT versus GG, odds ratios (OR): 1.32; 99% confidence intervals (CI): 1.00–1.74, Ptrend = 0.003) and two were marginally associated with prostate cancer risk (rs6969502-AA versus rs6969502-GG, OR: 0.87, 99% CI: 0.75–1.02; Ptrend = 0.002 and rs7805828-AA versus rs7805828-GG, OR: 1.11, 99% CI: 0.99–1.26; Ptrend = 0.007). An increase in breast cancer risk was observed for the PTGS2 polymorphism rs7550380 (TT versus GG, OR: 1.38, 99% CI: 1.04–1.83). No association was observed between PTGS2 polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk. In conclusion, common genetic variation in these two genes might play at best a limited role in breast and prostate cancers.

  T Truong , W Sauter , J. D McKay , H. D Hosgood , C Gallagher , C. I Amos , M Spitz , J Muscat , P Lazarus , T Illig , H. E Wichmann , H Bickeboller , A Risch , H Dienemann , Z. F Zhang , B. P Naeim , P Yang , S Zienolddiny , A Haugen , L Le Marchand , Y. C Hong , J. H Kim , E. J Duell , A. S Andrew , C Kiyohara , H Shen , K Matsuo , T Suzuki , A Seow , D. P. K Ng , Q Lan , D Zaridze , N Szeszenia Dabrowska , J Lissowska , P Rudnai , E Fabianova , V Constantinescu , V Bencko , L Foretova , V Janout , N. E Caporaso , D Albanes , M Thun , M. T Landi , J Trubicka , M Lener , J Lubinski , Wang EPIC lung , A Chabrier , P Boffetta , P Brennan and R. J. Hung
 

Background. Analysis of candidate genes in individual studies has had only limited success in identifying particular gene variants that are conclusively associated with lung cancer risk. In the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), we conducted a coordinated genotyping study of 10 common variants selected because of their prior evidence of an association with lung cancer. These variants belonged to candidate genes from different cancer-related pathways including inflammation (IL1B), folate metabolism (MTHFR), regulatory function (AKAP9 and CAMKK1), cell adhesion (SEZL6) and apoptosis (FAS, FASL, TP53, TP53BP1 and BAT3). Methods. Genotype data from 15 ILCCO case–control studies were available for a total of 8431 lung cancer cases and 11 072 controls of European descent and Asian ethnic groups. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the association between each variant and lung cancer risk. Results. Only the association between a non-synonymous variant of TP53BP1 (rs560191) and lung cancer risk was significant (OR = 0.91, P = 0.002). This association was more striking for squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 0.86, P = 6 x 10–4). No heterogeneity by center, ethnicity, smoking status, age group or sex was observed. In order to confirm this association, we included results for this variant from a set of independent studies (9966 cases/11 722 controls) and we reported similar results. When combining all these studies together, we reported an overall OR = 0.93 (0.89–0.97) (P = 0.001). This association was significant only for squamous cell carcinoma [OR = 0.89 (0.85–0.95), P = 1 x 10–4]. Conclusion. This study suggests that rs560191 is associated to lung cancer risk and further highlights the value of consortia in replicating or refuting published genetic associations.

  E Lee , C Hsu , C. A Haiman , P Razavi , P. L Horn Ross , D Van Den Berg , L Bernstein , L Le Marchand , B. E Henderson , V. W Setiawan and G. Ursin
 

Background: It is well established that estrogen increases endometrial cancer risk, whereas progesterone opposes the estrogen effects. The PROGINS allele of the progesterone receptor (PGR) gene reduces the function of PGR and has been associated with increased risk of the endometrioid type ovarian cancer. We investigated whether genetic variation in PGR is also associated with endometrial cancer risk using a haplotype-based approach. Methods: We pooled data from two endometrial cancer case–control studies that were nested within two prospective cohorts, the Multiethnic Cohort Study and the California Teachers Study. Seventeen haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across four linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks spanning the PGR locus were genotyped in 583 incident cases and 1936 control women. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with each haplotype were estimated using conditional logistic regression, stratified by age and ethnicity. Results: Genetic variation in LD block 3 of the PGR locus was associated with endometrial cancer risk (Pglobal test = 0.002), with haplotypes 3C, 3D and 3F associated with 31–34% increased risk. Among whites (383 cases/840 controls), genetic variation in all four blocks was associated with increased endometrial cancer risk (Pglobal test = 0.010, 0.013, 0.005 and 0.020). Haplotypes containing the PROGINS allele and several haplotypes in blocks 1, 3 and 4 were associated with 34–77% increased risk among whites. SNP analyses for whites suggested that rs608995, partially linked to the PROGINS allele (r2 = 0.6), was associated with increased risk (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.06–1.59). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in the PGR region is associated with endometrial cancer risk.

  P. T Campbell , E. T Jacobs , C. M Ulrich , J. C Figueiredo , J. N Poynter , J. R McLaughlin , R. W Haile , E. J Jacobs , P. A Newcomb , J. D Potter , L Le Marchand , R. C Green , P Parfrey , H. B Younghusband , M Cotterchio , S Gallinger , M. A Jenkins , J. L Hopper , J. A Baron , S. N Thibodeau , N. M Lindor , P. J Limburg , M. E Martinez and for the Colon Cancer Family Registry
  Background

Being overweight or obese is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer, more so for men than for women. Approximately 10%–20% of colorectal tumors display microsatellite instability (MSI), defined as the expansion or contraction of small repeated sequences in the DNA of tumor tissue relative to nearby normal tissue. We evaluated associations between overweight or obesity and colorectal cancer risk, overall and by tumor MSI status.

Methods

The study included 1794 case subjects with incident colorectal cancer who were identified through population-based cancer registries and 2684 of their unaffected sex-matched siblings as control subjects. Recent body mass index (BMI), BMI at age 20 years, and adult weight change were derived from self-reports of height and weight. Tumor MSI status, assessed at as many as 10 markers, was obtained for 69.7% of the case subjects and classified as microsatellite (MS)-stable (0% of markers unstable; n = 913), MSI-low (>0% but <30% of markers unstable; n = 149), or MSI-high (≥30% of markers unstable; n = 188). Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Recent BMI, modeled in 5 kg/m2 increments, was positively associated with risk of colorectal cancer for men and women combined (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.34), for women only (OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.32), and for men only (OR = 1.30; 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.47). There was no interaction with sex (P = .22). Recent BMI, per 5 kg/m2, was positively associated with the risk of MS-stable (OR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.24 to 1.54) and MSI-low (OR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.72) colorectal tumors, but not with the risk of MSI-high tumors (OR = 1.05; 95% CI = 0.84 to 1.31).

Conclusion

The increased risk of colorectal cancer associated with a high BMI might be largely restricted to tumors that display the more common MS-stable phenotype, suggesting further that colorectal cancer etiology differs by tumor MSI status.

  T Truong , R. J Hung , C. I Amos , X Wu , H Bickeboller , A Rosenberger , W Sauter , T Illig , H. E Wichmann , A Risch , H Dienemann , R Kaaks , P Yang , R Jiang , J. K Wiencke , M Wrensch , H Hansen , K. T Kelsey , K Matsuo , K Tajima , A. G Schwartz , A Wenzlaff , A Seow , C Ying , A Staratschek Jox , P Nurnberg , E Stoelben , J Wolf , P Lazarus , J. E Muscat , C. J Gallagher , S Zienolddiny , A Haugen , H. F. M van der Heijden , L. A Kiemeney , D Isla , J. I Mayordomo , T Rafnar , K Stefansson , Z. F Zhang , S. C Chang , J. H Kim , Y. C Hong , E. J Duell , A. S Andrew , F Lejbkowicz , G Rennert , H Muller , H Brenner , L Le Marchand , S Benhamou , C Bouchardy , M. D Teare , X Xue , J McLaughlin , G Liu , J. D McKay , P Brennan and M. R. Spitz
  Background

Genome-wide association studies have identified three chromosomal regions at 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21 as being associated with the risk of lung cancer. To confirm these associations in independent studies and investigate heterogeneity of these associations within specific subgroups, we conducted a coordinated genotyping study within the International Lung Cancer Consortium based on independent studies that were not included in previous genome-wide association studies.

Methods

Genotype data for single-nucleotide polymorphisms at chromosomes 15q25 (rs16969968, rs8034191), 5p15 (rs2736100, rs402710), and 6p21 (rs2256543, rs4324798) from 21 case–control studies for 11 645 lung cancer case patients and 14 954 control subjects, of whom 85% were white and 15% were Asian, were pooled. Associations between the variants and the risk of lung cancer were estimated by logistic regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Associations between 15q25 and the risk of lung cancer were replicated in white ever-smokers (rs16969968: odds ratio [OR] = 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21 to 1.32, Ptrend = 2 x 10–26), and this association was stronger for those diagnosed at younger ages. There was no association in never-smokers or in Asians between either of the 15q25 variants and the risk of lung cancer. For the chromosome 5p15 region, we confirmed statistically significant associations in whites for both rs2736100 (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.20, Ptrend = 1 x 10–10) and rs402710 (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.19, Ptrend = 5 x 10–8) and identified similar associations in Asians (rs2736100: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.35, Ptrend = 2 x 10–5; rs402710: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.27, Ptrend = .007). The associations between the 5p15 variants and lung cancer differed by histology; odds ratios for rs2736100 were highest in adenocarcinoma and for rs402710 were highest in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas. This pattern was observed in both ethnic groups. Neither of the two variants on chromosome 6p21 was associated with the risk of lung cancer.

Conclusions

In this international genetic association study of lung cancer, previous associations found in white populations were replicated and new associations were identified in Asian populations. Future genetic studies of lung cancer should include detailed stratification by histology.

 
 
 
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