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Articles by L Ding
Total Records ( 4 ) for L Ding
  R. H Amin , S. T Mathews , H. S Camp , L Ding and T. Leff
 

The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) plays a key role in regulating whole body glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Although it is expressed most highly in adipose, it is also present at lower levels in many tissues, including skeletal muscle. The role muscle PPAR plays in metabolic regulation and in mediating the antidiabetic effects of the thiazolidinediones is not understood. The goal of this work was to examine the molecular and physiological effects of PPAR activation in muscle cells. We found that pharmacological activation of PPAR in primary cultured myocytes, and genetic activation of muscle PPAR in muscle tissue of transgenic mice, induced the production of adiponectin directly from muscle cells. This muscle-produced adiponectin was functional and capable of stimulating adiponectin signaling in myocytes. In addition, elevated skeletal muscle PPAR activity in transgenic mice provided a significant protection from high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance and associated changes in muscle phenotype, including reduced myocyte lipid content and an increase in the proportion of oxidative muscle fiber types. Our findings demonstrate that PPAR activation in skeletal muscle can have a significant protective effect on whole body glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance and that myocytes can produce and secrete functional adiponectin in a PPAR-dependent manner. We propose that activation of PPAR in myocytes induces a local production of adiponectin that acts on muscle tissue to improve insulin sensitivity.

  L Ding , L Dong , X Chen , L Zhang , X Xu , A Ferro and B. Xu
 

Background— Left ventricular (LV) remodeling is associated with the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Here we investigated whether integrin-linked kinase (ILK) may regulate LV remodeling and function after myocardial infarction.

Methods and Results— Adenoviral vector expressing ILK (n=25) or empty adeno-null (n=25) was injected into rat peri-infarct myocardium after left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. ILK expression was confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Echocardiographic and hemodynamic analyses demonstrated relatively preserved cardiac function in adeno-ILK animals. ILK treatment was associated with reduced infarct scar size, increased scar thinning ratio, and preserved LV diameter, wall thickness, cardiomyocyte size, and myofilament density. Enhanced angiogenesis and reduced fibrosis were observed in the adeno-ILK group, along with reduced apoptosis as demonstrated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP nick-end labeling analysis. Moreover, increased cardiomyocyte proliferation was found in adeno-ILK animals, as measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Ki-67, and phosphohistone-H3 staining. At long-term follow-up, most indices of cardiac function and hemodynamics showed no difference between adeno-ILK and control animals by 9 weeks, although LV end-systolic diameter and infarct scar size were reduced in the adeno-ILK group at this time point. Additionally, ILK overexpression was found to exert a rescue effect on remodeling when administered in a delayed fashion 1 week after coronary artery ligation.

Conclusions— ILK gene therapy improves cardiac remodeling and function in rats after myocardial infarction and is associated with increased angiogenesis, reduced apoptosis, and increased cardiomyocyte proliferation. This may represent a new approach to the treatment of postinfarct remodeling and subsequent heart failure.

  L Zhang , K Lau , J Cheng , H Yu , Y Li , G Sugiarto , S Huang , L Ding , V Thon , P. G Wang and X. Chen
 

Lewis x (Lex) and sialyl Lewis x (SLex)-containing glycans play important roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. The key enzyme for the final step formation of these Lewis antigens is 1-3-fucosyltransferase. Here we report molecular cloning and functional expression of a novel Helicobacter hepaticus 1-3-fucosyltransferase (HhFT1) which shows activity towards both non-sialylated and sialylated Type II oligosaccharide acceptor substrates. It is a promising catalyst for enzymatic and chemoenzymatic synthesis of Lex, sialyl Lex and their derivatives. Unlike all other 1-3/4-fucosyltransferases characterized so far which belong to Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy, http://www.cazy.org/) glycosyltransferase family GT10, the HhFT1 shares protein sequence homology with 1-2-fucosyltransferases and belongs to CAZy glycosyltransferase family GT11. The HhFT1 is thus the first 1-3-fucosyltransferase identified in the GT11 family.

  H Zhu , G. J Li , L Ding , X Cui , H Berg , S. M Assmann and Y. Xia
 

Heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins, which consist of G, Gβ, and G subunits, play important roles in transducing extracellular signals perceived by cell surface receptors into intracellular physiological responses. In addition to a single prototypical G protein (GPA1), Arabidopsis has three unique G-like proteins, known as XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3, that have been found to be localized in nuclei, although their functions and mode of action remain largely unknown. Through a transcriptomic analysis, we found that XLG2 and XLG3 were rapidly induced by infection with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, whereas the XLG1 transcript level was not affected by pathogen infection. A reverse genetic screen revealed that the xlg2 loss-of-function mutation causes enhanced susceptibility to P. syringae. Transcriptome profiling revealed that the xlg2 mutation affects pathogen-triggered induction of a small set of defense-related genes. However, xlg1 and xlg3 mutants showed no difference from wild-type plants in resistance to P. syringae. In addition, the xlg2 xlg3 double mutant and the xlg1 xlg2 xlg3 triple mutant were not significantly different from the xlg2 single mutant in the disease resistance phenotype, suggesting that the roles of XLG1 and XLG3 in defense, if any, are less significant than for XLG2. Constitutive overexpression of XLG2 leads to the accumulation of abnormal transcripts from multiple defense-related genes. Through co-immunoprecipitation assays, XLG2 was found to interact with AGB1, the sole Gβ subunit in Arabidopsis, which has previously been found to be a positive regulator in resistance to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. However, no significant difference was found between three xlg single mutants, the xlg2 xlg3 double mutant, the xlg triple mutant, and wild-type plants in resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea or Alternaria brassicicola. These results suggest that XLG2 and AGB1 are components of a G-protein complex different from the prototypical heterotrimeric G-protein and may have distinct functions in modulating defense responses.

 
 
 
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