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Articles by Khalil I. Al-Mughrabi
Total Records ( 3 ) for Khalil I. Al-Mughrabi
  Khalil I. Al-Mughrabi
  Field trials were conducted in Wicklow, New Brunswick, Canada to study the antibiosis ability of aerobic compost tea against foliar and tuber diseases of potatoes. For soil drenching, extracts were prepared using three types of compost organic material including thermal compost, static wood chips and vermi castings. Kelp, humates, rock dusts, grain and alfalfa meal, soluble plant sugar and liquefied fish were added during a 24 h compost tea aerobic brewing cycle. For foliar application, soluble plant sugar, a natural yucca surfactant and liquefied fish were added as food to the compost tea prior to foliar application. Six treatments were used: untreated control (C); drench compost tea (DCT); foliar food (FF); foliar compost tea (FCT); drench compost tea+foliar food (DCT+FF) and drench compost tea + foliar compost tea (DCT+FCT). Both soil drenching and foliar application of compost tea or food lead to a significant increase in the severity of foliar late blight (Phytophthora infestans). Compost tea treatments had significant effects on emergence, stems number, silver scurf (Helminthosporium solani) and black scurf (Rhizoctonia solani). Foliar food applications increased the number of stems produced. The severity of silver scurf was the highest when drench compost tea treatment was used. In case of black scurf, the severity was the highest when a combination of both drench compost tea and foliar compost tea were applied. Treatments had no significant effect on dry rot (Fusarium sp.), common scab (Streptomyces scabiei), early blight (Alternaria solani), bacterial soft rot (Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora), yield, or size of tubers produced.
  Khalil I. Al-Mughrabi
  Trials were conducted at the Potato Development Centre, Wicklow, New Brunswick, Canada to study the effect of Salicylic Acid (SA) in suppressing black scurf (Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, AG-3) disease in potatoes (cv. Atlantic) under screenhouse conditions. The trials were designed as a completely randomized block and comprised of eight replicated treatments: Untreated, uninoculated control (CTH); untreated control inoculated with R. solani (CTD); healthy seed treated with SA (STH); seeds inoculated with R. solani and treated with SA (STD); healthy seeds with SA applied foliarly (FAH); seeds inoculated with R. solani and SA applied foliarly (FAD); healthy seeds with SA applied as soil drench (SDH); seeds inoculated with R. solani and SA applied as soil drench (SDD). Seedling emergence, plant canopy, disease severity of black scurf and total tuber weights were recorded. Plant canopy was significantly higher in plants inoculated with R. solani and treated with SA compared to uninoculated treatments. All SA treatments significantly reduced black scurf disease severity in stems compared to the untreated, inoculated controls. Compared to the CTD, black scurf disease severity in stems was reduced by 89.6 and 88.8% when FAH and SDH treatments, respectively, were used. Treatments inoculated with R. solani and treated with SA significantly increased potato tuber weights compared to the uninoculated controls. Present findings indicate that SA has the potential to be used as an alternative tool in managing black scurf disease in potatoes.
  Khalil I. Al-Mughrabi
  Field trials were conducted in Hartland, New Brunswick, Canada to study the effect of in-storage treatment of seed potatoes with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on emergence and yield parameters of Dark Red Norland potatoes. The trials included: (1) an untreated control; (2) control untreated with H2O2 in storage but sprayed with a mixture of H2O2 and water at a rate of 1:100 before planting; (3) potatoes treated with H2O2 in storage at 1:50 rate for 16 weeks and (4) potatoes treated with H2O2 in storage at 1:50 rate for 16 weeks and then sprayed with H2O2 at 1:100 rate prior to planting. Plant emergence was assessed and percent emergence was calculated 45 days after planting. Potato tubers were graded for total yield, tuber size, tuber weight, tuber number and miss-shaped tubers. Tuber sizes included the following categories: <1.75``, >1.75``<=2.0``, >2.0``<=2.25``, >2.25``<=2.75``, >2.75``<=3.0``, >3.0``<=3.25`` and >280 g. Marketable yield which included all tubers measuring >2`` in diameter was also calculated. Among these treatments, application of H2O2 in storage and then treating seed pieces before planting with H2O2 at the rate of 1:100 resulted in significantly higher percentage of seedling emergence and total and marketable yields compared to other treatments. The remaining three treatments did not differ significantly among each other with respect to percent seedling emergence and total and marketable yields. Results of this study indicated that under the conditions followed in these trials, H2O2 had no negative effect on sprouting, seedling emergence or yield. This is the first study of its kind to examine the effect of storage treatment of potatoes with H2O2 before planting on yield parameters of potato, including emergence, yield, size and weight of harvested tubers.
 
 
 
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