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Articles by Kanda Lokaewmanee
Total Records ( 6 ) for Kanda Lokaewmanee
  Kanda Lokaewmanee
  Background and Objective: The nutritive value of mao pomace includes a high concentration of organic acids, which can be exploited in broiler chicken production. The performance and economic characteristics were evaluated of broilers fed varying dietary levels of mao pomace. Materials and Methods: In total, 400 days old Cobb broilers were randomly allocated based on a completely randomized design into 4 treatments with 5 replications (20 birds/replicate). Dietary treatments consisted of (1) Basal diet (CON), (2) Basal diet+0.5 g kg–1 of mao pomace from the juice industry (MPJ1), (3) Basal diet+1.0 g kg–1 of mao pomace from the juice industry (MPJ2) and (4) Basal diet+1.5 g kg–1 of mao pomace from the juice industry (MPJ3). Data were analyzed by general linear models, using a completely randomized design (CRD), the means were compared with Duncan’s test (p<0.05) using Tukey’s test. Results: The results showed that the feed intake and feed conversion ratio were higher in MPJ2 (p<0.05) during age 7-14 days, whereas, viability was unaffected after dietary supplementation during the starter period (p>0.05). In addition, body weight gain, feed intake, average daily gain and production index were unaffected during age 15-42 days (p>0.05). The feed conversion ratio increased in MPJ2 during the overall period, whereas, viability improved in MPJ1, MPJ2 and MPJ3 during the overall period relative to the control (p<0.05). Moreover, the feed cost per gain and net profits per bird increased in MPJ3, whereas, the return of investment in comparison with the control group was significantly suppressed in MPJ2 (p<0.05). Conclusion: The MPJ-supplemented birds exhibited better viability and it was better to supplement the basal diet during age 7-14 days. Further detailed study is required on the mechanism and meat quality analysis in broilers.
  Kanda Lokaewmanee
  This study investigated the effect of different mao pomace diets on the production performance and egg quality of laying hens. A total of 144 Chareon Pokphan Brown laying hens aged 31 weeks were used in a completely randomized design experiment with three treatments. The basal diet was supplemented with 0% mao pomace (control) while the other treatments involved 5 g/kg (0.05%) mao pomace from juice production (MPJ) and 5 g/kg (0.05%) mao pomace from wine production (MPW). Each treatment had 16 replicates with three laying hens each in an evaporative cooling housing system. The results showed that laying hens fed with 0.5% MPW had a significantly improved egg laying rate and feed cost per dozen eggs when compared to the control group (p<0.05) but there was no difference between the laying hens fed with the control and the 0.5% MPJ in the egg laying rate and feed cost per dozen eggs (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in production performance, egg quality and egg grading among the dietary treatments (p>0.05). The results showed that the mao pomace from juice and wine production did not reduce production performance and egg quality. From these results, it is suggested that a diet with 0.5% MPW can reduce the feed cost per dozen eggs of layer chickens due to an increased egg laying rate.
  Kanda Lokaewmanee
  Objective: This study compared the quality of 930 Khaki Campbell duck eggs under storage conditions at 30°C and 78% relative humidity, for 0-30 days. Methodology: During the 31-day storage period, 30 duck eggs/day were evaluated for the shape index, albumen index, yolk index, shell color (L*, a* and b*), specific gravity, shell breaking strength, shell thickness, Haugh unit, yolk color, pH of albumen, pH of yolk, albumen percentage, yolk percentage and shell percentage. Results: The storage period had no statistically significant effect on the shell strength, pH of albumen, pH of yolk, albumen percentage, yolk percentage and shell percentage (p>0.05). In addition, the shape index, albumen index, yolk index, shell color (L*, a* and b*), specific gravity, shell thickness, Haugh unit and yolk color were significantly affected by the storage period (p<0.05). The Haugh unit values decreased significantly when the storage period lengthened (p<0.01). Conclusion: These results showed that Khaki Campbell duck eggs stored for 11 days at 30°C and 78% relative humidity still maintained relatively good internal quality characteristics for human consumption.
  Kanda Lokaewmanee and Panward Promdee
  Objective: This study was conducted to determine the effect of mao pomace on the carcass and meat quality of broiler chickens. Methodology: The sample was divided into 4 groups, with 4 replicates of 25 chicks each. The chicks were provided ad libitum access to a diet consisting of 0% mao pomace (CON), 0.5% mao pomace (MPJ1), 1.0% mao pomace (MPJ2) or 1.5% mao pomace (MPJ3). The crude protein and metabolizable energy concentrations of these diets were adjusted to 230 g kg–1 CP and 13.40 MJ kg–1 ME for the 7-21 days-old chicks and 200 g kg–1 CP and 13.40 MJ kg–1 ME for the 22-42 days-old chicks, respectively. At 42 days, 15 chicks from each group were slaughtered and carcasses and meat quality were tested. Results: Carcass quality was not different among the groups, except for thigh weight with bone and total visceral organ weight, both of which decreased in the MPJ2 and MPJ3 groups. The diet supplemented with mao pomace improved the redness (a*) of the skin and the redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) of the abdominal fat, whereas it reduced the lightness (L*) of the breast meat and the redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) of the breast fillets of male broiler chickens. The shear force of the breast muscle increased in MPJ1, MPJ2 and MPJ3 groups (p<0.05). Cooking loss and drip loss were the highest in the MPJ3 group (p<0.05). The sensory scores of raw and cooked breast meat were not affected (p>0.05) by mao pomace supplementation. In contrast, the tenderness and taste of cooked breast meat were affected, with the highest scores (p<0.05) recorded from the MPJ2 group. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the meat, skin color, odor and overall acceptance of raw chicken breast samples among the CON, MPJ1, MPJ2 and MPJ3 groups. The sensory scores of cooked chicken breast meat for juiciness, flavor, mao odor and overall acceptance were not affected (p>0.05) by mao pomace supplementation. However, tenderness and taste were affected, with the highest scores (p<0.05) seen in MPJ2. Conclusion: Dietary supplementation of MPJ enhanced meat quality.
  Kanda Lokaewmanee
  Objective: This study was conducted to determine the effect of chili leaf on laying hen performance, egg quality and egg yolk cholesterol levels. Materials and Methods: The completely randomized design involved evaluation of a control (no chili leaf powder) diet and experimental diets supplemented with chili leaf powder (CLP) at 1, 2 or 3%. One hundred and twenty laying hens (Charoen Pokphand Brown) at 61 weeks of age were divided into 4 treatments, each with 10 replicates (3 birds per replicate). Each group was randomly allocated to one of the treatments for 5 weeks. All diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric. Results: The results of the effect of supplementation with CLP at 0, 1, 2 and 3% showed that the body weight gain, egg yield, egg weight and cholesterol were not significantly different among the treatments (p>0.05). However, supplementation with CLP at 0 and 1% resulted in a higher feed intake and feed conversion ratio than those obtain with CLP supplementation at 3% (p<0.05). There were no significant differences among treatments in egg quality, breaking strength, shell thickness, yolk color, yolk percentage, shell percentage, albumen percentage, Haugh unit, lightness (L*) of yolk color, redness of yolk color (a*) and yellowness (b*) of yolk color (p>0.05). Conclusion: Dietary supplementation with 3% CLP can be used as alternative feed additive for laying hens despite an adverse effect on feed intake and feed conversion ratio, as feeding 3% CLP had no adverse effects on egg quality.
  Kanda Lokaewmanee
  Background and Objective: There is growing interest in the use of industry by-products in the animal and poultry husbandry. This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of mao (Antidesma sp.) pomace (MP) on egg-laying performance, egg quality and cholesterol levels in the egg yolks of laying hens. Materials and Methods: Ninety laying hens (Charoen Pokphand Brown)at 59 weeks of age were divided into 6 treatment groups; each group had 5 replicates, with 3 birds per replicate. The six groups of laying hens were fed a corn and soybean meal-based diet supplemented with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 g kg–1 of diet of MP. Laying performance, egg quality and cholesterol levels in the egg yolks were monitored for 16 weeks. The diets contained 2,750 kcal kg–1 of metabolizable energy and 17.50% crude protein. Results: Diets supplemented with MP did not affect average daily feed intake (ADFI), laying rate, average egg weight, egg mass, ADFI:egg mass ratio or cholesterol levels in egg yolk (p>0.05). Conclusion: Neither the performances of laying hens nor the cholesterol levels in egg yolks were affected by the inclusion of MP in the diet. However, 5 g kg–1 MP diet supplementation may lead to the development of light egg-yolk color, as demanded by specialty markets.
 
 
 
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