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Articles by K. J Lee
Total Records ( 3 ) for K. J Lee
  S. J Lee , C. W Kim , K. J Lee , J. W Choe , S. E Kim , J. H Oh and Y. S. Park
  Background

S100B is a biomarker that reflects injury to the central nervous system. As the spine is an integral part of the spinal cord, a study was undertaken to investigate whether serum S100B levels are associated with acute spinal fracture without head injury.

Methods

The study population consisted of 32 consecutive patients aged ≥18 years in whom the emergency physicians suspected spinal fractures. All the patients underwent CT scans to establish the diagnosis of spinal fracture. MRI was then performed on all the patients to determine the presence of spinal cord injury.

Results

Serum S100B levels were higher in the spinal fracture group than in the non-spinal fracture group, and 19 of the 20 patients in the spinal fracture group (95%) had an S100B level >0.12 µg/l, whereas all 12 of the non-spinal fracture group had an S100B level ≤0.12 µg/l. The S100B level in patients with epidural encroachment of the spinal cord was significantly higher (0.22–4.58 µg/l; mean 2.45 µg/l; 95% CI 0.95 to 3.94) than in those without epidural encroachment (0.114–2.87 µg/l; mean 0.80 µg/l; 95% CI 0.24 to 1.37) (p=0.037). Plain radiography revealed no definite abnormal findings in half of the patients with spinal fracture.

Conclusions

Serum S100B levels are raised in all patients with acute spinal fracture without head injury. Spinal fracture may therefore be one of the extracerebral sources of S100B. Serum S100B levels may be an effective tool for excluding subtle spinal fractures with no clear radiographic findings.

  M Bingmer , V Ozkan , J. m Jo , K. J Lee , H. S Baik and G. Schneider
 

Orthodontists commonly specify the alignment of the teeth and jaws by means of a set of k angles and their relationship with each other. Each individual can thus be visualized as a point in k-dimensional space. Individuals regarded as having an ideal occlusion and well-balanced face, form a cloud of points that is termed the ‘norm’ population. Individuals far from the cloud require orthodontic intervention.

In this study, a method is presented—the multiharmony method (MHM), which assists in treatment planning. With multiple regression analysis, the expected value that each angle should take in a norm individual when the remaining angles are given is estimated. The residual difference between the measured angle and its expected value then indicates the deviation from a harmonic appearance in the respective angle.

The MHM was applied to a data set of 134 Korean individuals identified as the norm population (Class I, mean age: 19.6 years) and to 87 patients (Class III, mean age: 21.2 years). From the number and size of the residuals, the two populations could be separated almost completely. Almost all patients showed residuals larger than any residual in the norm population (sensitivity: 99 per cent), whereas 90 per cent of all norm individuals showed no extreme residuals. The MHM can also be used to assist in visualizing different treatment effects, thereby assisting the orthodontist in choosing the best course of treatment for each patient.

  G. H Kim , K Park , S. Y Yeom , K. J Lee , G Kim , J Ko , D. K Rhee , Y. H Kim , H. K Lee , H. W Kim , G. T Oh , K. U Lee , J. W Lee and S. W. Kim
 

Activating signal cointegrator-2 (ASC-2) functions as a transcriptional coactivator of many nuclear receptors and also plays important roles in the physiology of the liver and pancreas by interacting with liver X receptors (LXRs), which antagonize the development of atherosclerosis. This study was undertaken to establish the specific function of ASC-2 in macrophages and atherogenesis. Intriguingly, ASC-2 was more highly expressed in macrophages than in the liver and pancreas. To inhibit LXR-specific activity of ASC-2, we used DN2, which contains the C-terminal LXXLL motif of ASC-2 and thereby acts as an LXR-specific, dominant-negative mutant of ASC-2. In DN2-overexpressing transgenic macrophages, cellular cholesterol content was higher and cholesterol efflux lower than in control macrophages. DN2 reduced LXR ligand-dependent increases in the levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apolipoprotein E (apoE) transcripts as well as the activity of luciferase reporters driven by the LXR response elements (LXREs) of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE genes. These inhibitory effects of DN2 were reversed by overexpression of ASC-2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that ASC-2 was recruited to the LXREs of the ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE genes in a ligand-dependent manner and that DN2 interfered with the recruitment of ASC-2 to these LXREs. Furthermore, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-null mice receiving bone marrow transplantation from DN2-transgenic mice showed accelerated atherogenesis when administered a high-fat diet. Taken together, these results indicate that suppression of the LXR-specific activity of ASC-2 results in both defective cholesterol metabolism in macrophages and accelerated atherogenesis, suggesting that ASC-2 is an antiatherogenic coactivator of LXRs in macrophages.

 
 
 
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