Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by K Shiomi
Total Records ( 4 ) for K Shiomi
  H Koike , N Atsuta , H Adachi , M Iijima , M Katsuno , T Yasuda , Y Fukada , K Yasui , K Nakashima , M Horiuchi , K Shiomi , K Fukui , S Takashima , Y Morita , K Kuniyoshi , Y Hasegawa , Y Toribe , M Kajiura , S Takeshita , E Mukai and G. Sobue
 

Acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy is a rare disorder that has been only anecdotally reported. We characterized the clinical, electrophysiological, pathological and prognostic features of 21 patients with acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. An antecedent event, mostly an upper respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract infection, was reported in two-thirds of patients. Profound autonomic failure with various degrees of sensory impairment characterized the neuropathic features in all patients. The initial symptoms were those related to autonomic disturbance or superficial sensory impairment in all patients, while deep sensory impairment accompanied by sensory ataxia subsequently appeared in 12 patients. The severity of sensory ataxia tended to become worse as the duration from the onset to the peak phase of neuropathy became longer (P < 0.001). The distribution of sensory manifestations included the proximal regions of the limbs, face, scalp and trunk in most patients. It tended to be asymmetrical and segmental, rather than presenting as a symmetric polyneuropathy. Pain of the involved region was a common and serious symptom. In addition to autonomic and sensory symptoms, coughing episodes, psychiatric symptoms, sleep apnoea and aspiration, pneumonia made it difficult to manage the clinical condition. Nerve conduction studies revealed the reduction of sensory nerve action potentials in patients with sensory ataxia, while it was relatively preserved in patients without sensory ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord revealed a high-intensity area in the posterior column on T2*-weighted gradient echo image in patients with sensory ataxia but not in those without it. Sural nerve biopsy revealed small-fibre predominant axonal loss without evidence of nerve regeneration. In an autopsy case with impairment of both superficial and deep sensations, we observed severe neuronal cell loss in the thoracic sympathetic and dorsal root ganglia, and Auerbach’s plexus with well preserved anterior hone cells. Myelinated fibres in the anterior spinal root were preserved, while those in the posterior spinal root and the posterior column of the spinal cord were depleted. Although recovery of sensory impairment was poor, autonomic dysfunction was ameliorated to some degree within several months in most patients. In conclusion, an immune-mediated mechanism may be associated with acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Small neuronal cells in the autonomic and sensory ganglia may be affected in the initial phase, and subsequently, large neuronal cells in the sensory ganglia are damaged.

  T Mogi , Y Ano , T Nakatsuka , H Toyama , A Muroi , H Miyoshi , C. T Migita , H Ui , K Shiomi , S Omura , K Kita and K. Matsushita
 

Cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidase (CioAB), a relative of cytochrome bd, has no spectroscopic features of hemes b595 and d in the wild-type bacteria and is difficult to purify for detailed characterization. Here we studied enzymatic and spectroscopic properties of CioAB from the acetic acid bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans. Gluconobacter oxydans CioAB showed the Km value for ubiquinol-1 comparable to that of Escherichia coli cytochrome bd but it was more resistant to KCN and quinone-analogue inhibitors except piericidin A and LL-Z1272. We obtained the spectroscopic evidence for the presence of hemes b595 and d. Heme b595 showed the peak at 587 nm in the reduced state and a rhombic high-spin signal at g = 6.3 and 5.5 in the air-oxidized state. Heme d showed the peak at 626 and 644 nm in the reduced and air-oxidized state, respectively, and an axial high-spin signal at g = 6.0 and low-spin signals at g = 2.63, 2.37 and 2.32. We found also a broad low-spin signal at g = 3.2, attributable to heme b558. Further, we identified the presence of heme D by mass spectrometry. In conclusion, CioAB binds all three ham species present in cytochrome bd quinol oxidase.

  T Mogi , T Kawakami , H Arai , Y Igarashi , K Matsushita , M Mori , K Shiomi , S Omura , S Harada and K. Kita
 

To identify antibiotics targeting to respiratory enzymes, we carried out matrix screening of a structurally varied natural compound library with Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane-bound respiratory enzymes. We identified a succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor, siccanin (IC50, 0.9 µM), which is a potent antibiotic against some pathogenic fungi like Trichophyton mentagrophytes and inhibits their mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase. We found that siccanin was effective against enzymes from P. aeruginosa, P. putida, rat and mouse mitochondria but ineffective or less effective against Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and porcine mitochondria enzyme. Action mode was mixed-type for quinone-dependent activity and noncompetitive for succinate-dependent activity, indicating the proximity of the inhibitor-binding site to the quinone-binding site. Species-selective inhibition by siccanin is unique among succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors, and thus siccanin is a potential lead compound for new chemotherapeutics.

  T Mogi , Y Murase , M Mori , K Shiomi , S Omura , M. P Paranagama and K. Kita
 

Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death due to a single infectious agent in the world and the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains prompted us to develop new drugs with novel targets and mechanism. Here, we screened a natural antibiotics library with Mycobacterium smegmatis membrane-bound dehydrogenases and identified polymyxin B (cationic decapeptide) and nanaomycin A (naphtoquinone derivative) as inhibitors of alternative NADH dehydrogenase [50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 1.6 and 31 µg/ml, respectively] and malate: quinone oxidoreductase (IC50 values of 4.2 and 49 µg/ml, respectively). Kinetic analysis on inhibition by polymyxin B showed that the primary site of action was the quinone-binding site. Because of the similarity in Km value for ubiquinone-1 and inhibitor sensitivity, we examined amino acid sequences of actinobacterial enzymes and found possible binding sites for l-malate and quinones. Proposed mechanisms of polymyxin B and nanaomycin A for the bacteriocidal activity were the destruction of bacterial membranes and production of reactive oxygen species, respectively, while this study revealed their inhibitory activity on bacterial membrane-bound dehydrogenases. Screening of the library with bacterial respiratory enzymes resulted in unprecedented findings, so we are hoping that continuing efforts could identify lead compounds for new drugs targeting to mycobacterial respiratory enzymes.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility