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Articles by K Imoto
Total Records ( 2 ) for K Imoto
  S Christen Zaech , K Imoto , S. G Khan , K. S Oh , D Tamura , J. J DiGiovanna , J Boyle , N. J Patronas , R Schiffmann , K. H Kraemer and A. S. Paller
 

Background  Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a decreased ability to repair DNA damaged by UV radiation and the early development of cutaneous and ocular malignant neoplasms. Approximately 20% of patients with XP also develop progressive neurologic degeneration.

Observations  We describe a boy who was found to have XP after a severe burn following minimal sun exposure. His maternal uncle, now age 20 years, had been diagnosed with XP after a similar sunburn in infancy. The uncle has the typical skin pigmentary findings of XP along with severe progressive neurologic involvement. Although the infant's parents were not known to be blood relatives, the infant and his affected uncle proved to be compound heterozygotes for the same 2 frameshift mutations in the XPA DNA repair gene (c.288delT and c.349_353del). After the diagnosis of XP in the infant, genealogic investigation identified a common Dutch ancestor for both of his grandfathers 5 generations back.

Conclusions  Counseling families at risk for a rare inherited disease is not always straightforward. The sociocultural and demographic backgrounds of the families must be considered for evaluation of risk assessment.

  H Itoh , T Sakaguchi , W. G Ding , E Watanabe , I Watanabe , Y Nishio , T Makiyama , S Ohno , M Akao , Y Higashi , N Zenda , T Kubota , C Mori , K Okajima , T Haruna , A Miyamoto , M Kawamura , K Ishida , I Nagaoka , Y Oka , Y Nakazawa , T Yao , H Jo , Y Sugimoto , T Ashihara , H Hayashi , M Ito , K Imoto , H Matsuura and M. Horie
 

Background— Drugs with IKr-blocking action cause secondary long-QT syndrome. Several cases have been associated with mutations of genes coding cardiac ion channels, but their frequency among patients affected by drug-induced long-QT syndrome (dLQTS) and the resultant molecular effects remain unknown.

Methods and Results— Genetic testing was carried out for long-QT syndrome–related genes in 20 subjects with dLQTS and 176 subjects with congenital long-QT syndrome (cLQTS); electrophysiological characteristics of dLQTS-associated mutations were analyzed using a heterologous expression system with Chinese hamster ovary cells together with a computer simulation model. The positive mutation rate in dLQTS was similar to cLQTS (dLQTS versus cLQTS, 8 of 20 [40%] versus 91 of 176 [52%] subjects, P=0.32). The incidence of mutations was higher in patients with torsades de pointes induced by nonantiarrhythmic drugs than by antiarrhythmic drugs (antiarrhythmic versus others, 3 of 14 [21%] versus 5 of 6 [83%] subjects, P<0.05). When reconstituted in Chinese hamster ovary cells, KCNQ1 and KCNH2 mutant channels showed complex gating defects without dominant negative effects or a relatively mild decreased current density. Drug sensitivity for mutant channels was similar to that of the wild-type channel. With the Luo-Rudy simulation model of action potentials, action potential durations of most mutant channels were between those of wild-type and cLQTS.

Conclusions— dLQTS had a similar positive mutation rate compared with cLQTS, whereas the functional changes of these mutations identified in dLQTS were mild. When IKr-blocking agents produce excessive QT prolongation (dLQTS), the underlying genetic background of the dLQTS subject should also be taken into consideration, as would be the case with cLQTS; dLQTS can be regarded as a latent form of long-QT syndrome.

 
 
 
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