Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by Jerome D. Cohen
Total Records ( 5 ) for Jerome D. Cohen
  Jerome D. Cohen , Eliot A. Brinton , Matthew K. Ito and Terry A. Jacobson
 

Background

Statins substantially reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and are generally well-tolerated. Despite this, many patients discontinue therapy. A better understanding of the characteristics of current and former statin users may be helpful for formulating strategies to improve long-term adherence.

Objective

The Understanding Statin Use in America and Gaps in Education (USAGE) survey assessed the attitudes, beliefs, practices, and behavior of current and former statin users.

Methods

Individuals 18 years or older who reported a history of high cholesterol and current or former statin use were identified within a registered consumer panel cohort in the United States and invited to participate in an Internet survey.

Results

Of the 10,138 respondents, 8918 (88%) were current statin users and 1220 (12%) were former users. Participants (mean age 61 years) were predominantly white (92%), female (61%), of middle income (median $44,504/yr), and had health insurance (93%). Among current users, 95% took a statin alone, and 70% had not missed a dose in the past month. Although ∼70% reported that their physicians had explained the importance of cholesterol levels for their heart health former users were less satisfied with the discussions (65% vs. 83%, P < .05). Muscle-related side effects were reported by 60% and 25% of former and current users, respectively (P < .05). Nearly half of all respondents switched statins at least once. The primary reason for switching by current users was cost (32%) and the primary reason for discontinuation was side effects (62%).

Conclusions

This survey provides important insights into behavior and attitudes among current and former statin users and the results suggest that more effective dialogue between healthcare providers and patients may increase persistence of statin use, particularly when the patient has concerns about side effects and drug costs.

  Melissa Y. Wei , Matthew K. Ito , Jerome D. Cohen , Eliot A. Brinton and Terry A. Jacobson
 

Background

Although statins have been shown to reduce cardiovascular disease mortality, less than half of U.S. adults achieve their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal. In many patients initiated on a statin, adherence rates decrease over time.

Objective

To characterize current and former statin users, identify reasons for the discontinuation or switching of statins, and identify factors associated with adherence.

Methods

The USAGE survey is a cross-sectional, self-administered Internet-based survey of 10,138 U.S. adults fielded September to October 2011. The following statin users were identified and compared: adherent nonswitchers, adherent switchers, non-adherent switchers, and discontinuers. Univariate and multivariate models using a priori covariates for adherence and discontinuation were examined.

Results

Most participants were current statin users who adhered with their prescribed statin (82.5%, n = 8371). Former statin users or discontinuers (12%, n = 1220) cited muscle pain, a side effect, as the primary reason for discontinuation (60%), followed by cost (16%), and then perceived lack of efficacy (13%). Discontinuers were less satisfied with their physicians' explanation of cholesterol treatment, more likely to use the Internet to research statins, and less likely to undergo frequent cholesterol monitoring. Among adherent statin users, the primary reasons for switching were muscle side effects (33%) and cost (32%). Individuals at risk for non-adherence included those with low household income, those who experienced muscle pain as a side effect while on statin therapy, and those taking medication for cardiovascular disease.

Conclusion

Statin-related muscle side effects are common and contribute significantly to rates of discontinuation, switching, and non-adherence. Improved physician patient communication about side effects and benefits of statins are necessary to improve both adherence and outcomes.

  Karen E. Aspry , Roy Furman , Dean G. Karalis , Terry A. Jacobson , Audrey M. Zhang , Gregory S. Liptak and Jerome D. Cohen
 

Background

Large gaps in lipid treatment and medication adherence persist in high-risk outpatients in the United States. Health information technology (HIT) is being applied to close quality gaps in chronic illness care, but its utility for lipid management has not been widely studied.

Objective

To perform a qualitative review of the impact of HIT interventions on lipid management processes of care (screening or testing; drug initiation, titration or adherence; or referrals) or clinical outcomes (percent at low density lipoprotein cholesterol goal; absolute lipid levels; absolute risk scores; or cardiac hospitalizations) in outpatients with coronary heart disease or at increased risk.

Methods

PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched using Medical Subject Headings related to clinical informatics and cholesterol or lipid management. English language articles that described a randomized controlled design, tested at least one HIT tool in high risk outpatients, and reported at least 1 lipid management process measure or clinical outcome, were included.

Results

Thirty-four studies that enrolled 87,874 persons were identified. Study ratings, outcomes, and magnitude of effects varied widely. Twenty-three trials reported a significant positive effect from a HIT tool on lipid management, but only 14 showed evidence that HIT interventions improve clinical outcomes. There was mixed evidence that provider-level computerized decision support improves outcomes. There was more evidence in support of patient-level tools that provide connectivity to the healthcare system, as well as system-level interventions that involve database monitoring and outreach by centralized care teams.

Conclusion

Randomized controlled trials show wide variability in the effects of HIT on lipid management outcomes. Evidence suggests that multilevel HIT approaches that target not only providers but include patients and systems approaches will be needed to improve lipid treatment, adherence and quality.

  Jerome D. Cohen , Karen E. Aspry , Alan S. Brown , JoAnne M. Foody , Roy Furman , Terry A. Jacobson , Dean G. Karalis , Penny M. Kris-Etherton and Ralph LaForge
  The workshop discussions focused on how low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal attainment can be enhanced with the use of health information technology (HIT) in different clinical settings. A gap is acknowledged in LDL-C goal attainment, but because of the passage of the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Acts there is now reason for optimism that this gap can be narrowed. For HIT to be effectively used to achieve treatment goals, it must be implemented in a setting in which the health care team is fully committed to achieving these goals. Implementation of HIT alone has not resulted in reducing the gap. It is critical to build an effective management strategy into the HIT platform without increasing the overall work/time burden on staff. By enhancing communication between the health care team and the patient, more timely adjustments to treatment plans can be made with greater opportunity for LDL-C goal attainment and improved efficiency in the long run. Patients would be encouraged to take a more active role. Support tools are available. The National Lipid Association has developed a toolkit designed to improve patient compliance and could be modified for use in an HIT system. The importance of a collaborative approach between nongovernmental organizations such as the National Lipid Association, National Quality Forum, HIT partners, and other members of the health care industry offers the best opportunity for long-term success and the real possibility that such efforts could be applied to other chronic conditions, for example, diabetes and hypertension.
  Matthew K. Ito , Kevin C. Maki , Eliot A. Brinton , Jerome D. Cohen and Terry A. Jacobson
 

Background

Drug interactions have been identified as a risk factor for muscle-related side effects in statin users.

Objectives

The aim was to assess whether use of medications that inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isozymes, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), or P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are associated with muscle-related symptoms among current and former statin users.

Methods

Persons (n = 10,138) from the Understanding Statin Use in America and Gaps in Education (USAGE) internet survey were categorized about whether they ever reported new or worsening muscle pain while taking a statin (n = 2935) or ever stopped a statin because of muscle pain (n = 1516). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess associations between use of concomitant therapies that inhibit CYP450 isozymes, OATP1B1, P-gp, or a combination and muscle-related outcomes.

Results

In multivariate analyses, concomitant use of a CYP450 inhibitor was associated with increased odds for new or worse muscle pain (odds ratio [OR] = 1.42; P < .001) or ever having stopped a statin because of muscle pain (OR = 1.28; P = .037). Concomitant use of medication known to inhibit both OATP1B1 and P-gp was also associated with increased odds (OR = 1.80; P = .030) of ever having stopped a statin because of muscle pain.

Conclusions

Concomitant use of medication(s) that inhibit statin metabolism was associated with increased odds of new or worse muscle pain while taking a statin and having previously stopped a statin because of muscle symptoms. These data emphasize the importance of enhancing the capabilities of clinicians and health systems for identifying and reducing statin drug interactions.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility