Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by J. Sadoshima
Total Records ( 4 ) for J. Sadoshima
  C. P Hsu , P Zhai , T Yamamoto , Y Maejima , S Matsushima , N Hariharan , D Shao , H Takagi , S Oka and J. Sadoshima
  Background—

Silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1), a class III histone deacetylase, retards aging and protects the heart from oxidative stress. We here examined whether Sirt1 is protective against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R).

Methods and Results—

Protein and mRNA expression of Sirt1 is significantly reduced by I/R. Cardiac-specific Sirt1–/– mice exhibited a significant increase (44±5% versus 15±5%; P=0.01) in the size of myocardial infarction/area at risk. In transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of Sirt1, both myocardial infarction/area at risk (15±4% versus 36±8%; P=0.004) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling–positive nuclei (4±3% versus 10±1%; P<0.003) were significantly reduced compared with nontransgenic mice. In Langendorff-perfused hearts, the functional recovery during reperfusion was significantly greater in transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of Sirt1 than in nontransgenic mice. Sirt1 positively regulates expression of prosurvival molecules, including manganese superoxide dismutase, thioredoxin-1, and Bcl-xL, whereas it negatively regulates the proapoptotic molecules Bax and cleaved caspase-3. The level of oxidative stress after I/R, as evaluated by anti-8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine staining, was negatively regulated by Sirt1. Sirt1 stimulates the transcriptional activity of FoxO1, which in turn plays an essential role in mediating Sirt1-induced upregulation of manganese superoxide dismutase and suppression of oxidative stress in cardiac myocytes. Sirt1 plays an important role in mediating I/R-induced increases in the nuclear localization of FoxO1 in vivo.

Conclusions—

These results suggest that Sirt1 protects the heart from I/R injury through upregulation of antioxidants and downregulation of proapoptotic molecules through activation of FoxO and decreases in oxidative stress.

  C. P Hsu , S Oka , D Shao , N Hariharan and J. Sadoshima
 

Rationale: NAD+ acts not only as a cofactor for cellular respiration but also as a substrate for NAD+-dependent enzymes, such as Sirt1. The cellular NAD+ synthesis is regulated by both the de novo and the salvage pathways. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway.

Objective: Here we investigated the role of Nampt in mediating NAD+ synthesis in cardiac myocytes and the function of Nampt in the heart in vivo.

Methods and Results: Expression of Nampt in the heart was significantly decreased by ischemia, ischemia/reperfusion and pressure overload. Upregulation of Nampt significantly increased NAD+ and ATP concentrations, whereas downregulation of Nampt significantly decreased them. Downregulation of Nampt increased caspase 3 cleavage, cytochrome c release, and TUNEL-positive cells, which were inhibited in the presence of Bcl-xL, but did not increase hairpin 2–positive cells, suggesting that endogenous Nampt negatively regulates apoptosis but not necrosis. Downregulation of Nampt also impaired autophagic flux, suggesting that endogenous Nampt positively regulates autophagy. Cardiac-specific overexpression of Nampt in transgenic mice increased NAD+ content in the heart, prevented downregulation of Nampt, and reduced the size of myocardial infarction and apoptosis in response to prolonged ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion.

Conclusions: Nampt critically regulates NAD+ and ATP contents, thereby playing an essential role in mediating cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis and stimulating autophagic flux in cardiac myocytes. Preventing downregulation of Nampt inhibits myocardial injury in response to myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. These results suggest that Nampt is an essential gatekeeper of energy status and survival in cardiac myocytes.

  T Ago , J Kuroda , J Pain , C Fu , H Li and J. Sadoshima
 

Rationale: NADPH oxidases are a major source of superoxide (O2) in the cardiovascular system. The function of Nox4, a member of the Nox family of NADPH oxidases, in the heart is poorly understood.

Objective: The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of Nox4 in mediating oxidative stress and growth/death in the heart.

Methods and Results: Expression of Nox4 in the heart was increased in response to hypertrophic stimuli and aging. Neither transgenic mice with cardiac specific overexpression of Nox4 (Tg-Nox4) nor those with catalytically inactive Nox4 (Tg-Nox4-P437H) showed an obvious baseline cardiac phenotype at young ages. Tg-Nox4 gradually displayed decreased left ventricular (LV) function with enhanced O2 production in the heart, which was accompanied by increased apoptosis and fibrosis at 13 to 14 months of age. On the other hand, the level of oxidative stress was attenuated in Tg-Nox4-P437H. Although the size of cardiac myocytes was significantly greater in Tg-Nox4 than in nontransgenic, the LV weight/tibial length was not significantly altered in Tg-Nox4 mice. Overexpression of Nox4 in cultured cardiac myocytes induced apoptotic cell death but not hypertrophy. Nox4 is primarily localized in mitochondria and upregulation of Nox4 enhanced both rotenone- and diphenyleneiodonium-sensitive O2 production in mitochondria. Cysteine residues in mitochondrial proteins, including aconitase and NADH dehydrogenases, were oxidized and their activities decreased in Tg-Nox4.

Conclusions: Upregulation of Nox4 by hypertrophic stimuli and aging induces oxidative stress, apoptosis and LV dysfunction, in part because of mitochondrial insufficiency caused by increased O2 production and consequent cysteine oxidation in mitochondrial proteins.

  N Hariharan , Y Maejima , J Nakae , J Paik , R. A DePinho and J. Sadoshima
  Rationale:

Autophagy, a bulk degradation process of cytosolic proteins and organelles, is protective during nutrient starvation in cardiomyocytes (CMs). However, the underlying signaling mechanism mediating autophagy is not well understood.

Objective:

We investigated the role of FoxOs and its posttranslational modification in mediating starvation-induced autophagy.

Methods and Results:

Glucose deprivation (GD) increased autophagic flux in cultured CMs, as evidenced by increased mRFP-GFP-LC3 puncta and decreases in p62, which was accompanied by upregulation of Sirt1 and FoxO1. Overexpression of either Sirt1 or FoxO1 was sufficient for inducing autophagic flux, whereas both Sirt1 and FoxO1 were required for GD-induced autophagy. GD increased deacetylation of FoxO1, and Sirt1 was required for GD-induced deacetylation of FoxO1. Overexpression of FoxO1(3A/LXXAA), which cannot interact with Sirt1, or p300, a histone acetylase, increased acetylation of FoxO1 and inhibited GD-induced autophagy. FoxO1 increased expression of Rab7, a small GTP-binding protein that mediates late autophagosome–lysosome fusion, which was both necessary and sufficient for mediating FoxO1-induced increases in autophagic flux. Although cardiac function was maintained in control mice after 48 hours of food starvation, it was significantly deteriorated in mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of FoxO1(3A/LXXAA), those with cardiac-specific homozygous deletion of FoxO1 (c-FoxO1–/–), and beclin1+/– mice, in which autophagy is significantly inhibited.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that Sirt1-mediated deacetylation of FoxO1 and upregulation of Rab7 play an important role in mediating starvation-induced increases in autophagic flux, which in turn plays an essential role in maintaining left ventricular function during starvation.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility