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Articles by J. L. Browne
Total Records ( 3 ) for J. L. Browne
  J. Speight , A. J. Sinclair , J. L. Browne , A. Woodcock and C. Bradley
  Aims  Around a quarter of UK care-home residents have diabetes. Diabetes is known to impact quality of life but existing diabetes-specific quality of life measures are unsuitable for elderly care-home residents. We aimed to develop and evaluate a new measure for use with older adults, to be particularly suitable for use with care-home residents: the Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL) Senior*.

Methods  Content and format changes were made to the 19-domain ADDQoL, informed by related measures for people with visual impairments (12 domain-specific items were retained, four items were revised/added and three items were removed). This revision was modified further following cognitive debriefing interviews with three older adults living in a care home. Psychometric evaluation of the newly developed 17-domain ADDQoL Senior was conducted using data from 90 care-home residents with diabetes who took part in a broader intervention study.

Results  The life domains most impacted by diabetes were ‘pindependence' and ‘freedom to eat as I wish'. The ADDQoL Senior demonstrated good factor structure and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.924). Domain scores were, as expected, significantly intercorrelated.

Conclusions  The ADDQoL Senior measures the perceived impact of diabetes on quality of life in older adults, and has been found to be suitable for those living in care homes if administered by interview. The scale has demonstrated acceptability and excellent psychometric properties. It is anticipated that the number of items may be reduced in the future if our current findings can be replicated.

  J. L. Browne , R. Scibilia and J. Speight
 

Aims

The mean age of onset of Type 2 diabetes mellitus is decreasing in Australia and internationally. We conducted an internet-based survey to improve our understanding of the emotional well-being and unmet needs of younger adults with Type 2 diabetes, and to inform service provision for this group.

Methods

A random sample of National Diabetes Services Scheme registrants (n = 1,417) with Type 2 diabetes, aged 18-39 years, living in the Australian state of Victoria received an invitation to complete the online survey. The study was also advertised state-wide. The survey included validated scales (PAID-5: diabetes-related distress; WHO-5: general emotional well-being) and study-specific items. A total of 149 eligible respondents participated.

Results

Almost two-thirds (63%) of respondents reported severe-diabetes related distress; more than a quarter (27%) had impaired general emotional well-being. Most (82%) were overweight or obese (BMI ≥ 25); most (77%) had at least one other co-morbidity. Lack of motivation, feeling burned out, and being time-poor were identified as top barriers to self-management. More than half (59%) of respondents had not participated in structured diabetes education. Respondents perceived that younger adults with Type 2 diabetes had different health-care needs than their older counterparts (68%), and that most Type 2 diabetes information/services were aimed at older adults (62%). Of a range of potential new services, respondents indicated greatest interest in an online forum specifically for younger adults with Type 2 diabetes.

Conclusions

Younger adults with Type 2 diabetes have impaired emotional well-being and physical health. Population-based research is needed to confirm the current findings, to further inform service delivery and optimise outcomes for this group.

  J. B. Dixon , J. L. Browne , K. G. Mosely , T. L. Rice , K. M. Jones , F. Pouwer and J. Speight
 

Aims

To investigate whether diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and perceived burden, particularly related to weight management, diet and physical activity, differ between adults with Type 2 diabetes who are severely obese and matched non-severely obese control subjects.

Methods

The 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES-Australia national survey had Type 2 diabetes and reported height and weight data, enabling BMI calculation: 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2; median BMI = 41.6 kg/m2) and these were matched with 530 control subjects (BMI < 35 kg/m2; median BMI = 28.2 kg/m2). Diabetes self-care behaviours, attitudes and burden were measured with the Diabetes Self-Care Inventory-Revised. Within-group and between-group trends were examined.

Results

The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 was less likely to achieve healthy diet and exercise targets, placed less importance on diet and exercise recommendations, and found the burden of diet and exercise recommendations to be greater than the group with BMI < 35 kg/m2. The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 was more likely to be actively trying to lose weight, but found weight control a greater burden. These issues accentuated with increasing obesity and were greatest in those with BMI > 45 kg/m2. There were no between-group differences in other aspects of diabetes self-care: self-monitoring of blood glucose, use of medications and smoking. Moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression were independently associated with reduced likelihood of healthy diet and physical activity, and with greater burden associated with diet, physical activity and weight management.

Conclusions

Severely obese people with diabetes demonstrated self-care attitudes, behaviours and burdens that infer barriers to weight loss. However, other important diabetes self-care behaviours are supported equally by severely obese and non-severely obese individuals.

 
 
 
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