Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by J. Huang
Total Records ( 4 ) for J. Huang
  Y. Yan , J. Huang , B. Chen , Y. Liu and C. Tan
  Radio bursts with fine structures in decimetric-centimetric wave range are generally believed to manifest the primary energy release process during flare/CME events. By spectropolarimeters in 1-2 GHz, 2.6-3.8 GHz, and 5.2-7.6 GHz at NAOC/Huairou with very high temporal (1.25-8 ms) and spectral (4-20 MHz) resolutions, the zebra patterns, spikes, and new types of radio fine structures with mixed frequency drift features are observed during several significant flare/CME events. In this paper we will discuss the occurrence of radio fine structures during the impulsive phase of flares and/or CME initiations, which may be connected to the magnetic reconnection processes.
  Y. K Wang , Y. L Zhu , F. M Qiu , T Zhang , Z. G Chen , S Zheng and J. Huang
 

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an important role in carcinogenesis, resistance to treatment and may lead to cancer recurrence and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism of CSC involved in these events needs to be further elucidated. In this study, CD133+ colon cancer cells were cultured, which showed CSC properties both in vitro and in vivo from metastatic tissue. Upstream molecules in Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were preferentially expressed in these CD133+ cells, as revealed by a global gene chip. The kinase activities of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk)1/2 were also significantly upregulated in CD133+ cells. In addition, the clonogenic growth of CD133+ cell was reduced greatly by inhibiting the activity of Akt and Erk1/2. The results revealed the Akt and MAPK pathways were involved in the tumorigenesis of CD133+ colon cancer cells, suggesting that molecules in these two pathways might be potential targets in the future therapy.

  X. Liang , Q. Wang , X. Yang , J. Cao , J. Chen , X. Mo , J. Huang , L. Wang and D. Gu
  Aims  To assess the effect of mobile phone intervention on glycaemic control in diabetes self-management. Methods We searched three electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library) using the following terms: diabetes or diabetes mellitus and mobile phone or cellular phone, or text message. We also manually searched reference lists of relevant papers to identify additional studies. Clinical studies that used mobile phone intervention and reported changes in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) values in patients with diabetes were reviewed. The study design, intervention methods, sample size and clinical outcomes were extracted from each trial. The results of the HbA1c change in the trials were pooled using meta-analysis methods.

Results  A total of 22 trials were selected for the review. Meta-analysis among 1657 participants showed that mobile phone interventions for diabetes self-management reduced HbA1c values by a mean of 0.5% [6 mmol/mol; 95% confidence interval, 0.3-0.7% (4-8 mmol/mol)] over a median of 6 months follow-up duration. In subgroup analysis, 11 studies among Type 2 diabetes patients reported significantly greater reduction in HbA1c than studies among Type 1 diabetes patients [0.8 (9 mmol/mol) vs. 0.3% (3 mmol/mol); P = 0.02]. The effect of mobile phone intervention did not significantly differ by other participant characteristics or intervention strategies.

Conclusions  Results pooled from the included trials provided strong evidence that mobile phone intervention led to statistically significant improvement in glycaemic control and self-management in diabetes care, especially for Type 2 diabetes patients.

  T. J Chemmanur , G Hu and J. Huang
 

In this article, we use a large sample of transaction-level institutional trading data to analyze the role of institutional investors in initial public offerings (IPOs). The theoretical literature on IPOs has long argued that institutional investors possess private information about IPOs and that underpricing is a mechanism for compensating them to reveal this private information. We study whether institutions indeed have private information about IPOs, retain their information advantage in post-IPO trading, and are able to realize significant profits from their participation in IPOs. We also study institutional IPO allocations and allocation sales to analyze whether institutions play an important role in supporting IPOs in the aftermarket and are rewarded by underwriters for playing such a role. We find that institutions sell 70.2% of their IPO allocations in the first year, fully realize the "money left on the table," and do not dissipate these profits in post-IPO trading. Further, institutions hold allocations in IPOs with weaker post-issue demand for a longer period, and they are rewarded for this by underwriters with more IPO allocations. Finally, institutional trading has predictive power for long-run IPO performance, especially in IPOs in which they received allocations; however, this predictive power decays over time. Overall, our results suggest that institutional investors possess significant private information about IPOs, play an important supportive role in the IPO aftermarket, and receive considerable compensation for their participation in IPOs.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility