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Articles by J. R Stark
Total Records ( 2 ) for J. R Stark
  J. R Stark , F Wiklund , H Gronberg , F Schumacher , J. A Sinnott , M. J Stampfer , L. A Mucci and P. Kraft
 

An understanding of factors associated with prostate cancer (PCa) mortality is increasingly important given the biological heterogeneity of disease. Previous studies have shown that genetic variation in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is associated with PCa incidence, but any role in progression and mortality is unclear. Among 1,252 PCa cases from the Cancer Prostate in Sweden study, we conducted time-to-event analyses of PCa mortality for 99 individual tagging SNPs and haploytpes from 20 genes in the TLR pathway. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 99% confidence intervals (99% CI). Global P values were estimated from a likelihood ratio test. During a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 191 PCa deaths occurred. Controlling for age and geographic location, two polymorphisms were statistically significantly associated with PCa mortality (P < 0.01). Compared with homozygous wild-type carriers of the TLR-9 polymorphism (rs187084), the HR (99% CI) was 1.57 (1.02, 2.41) for heterozygotes and 1.02 (0.57, 1.84) for rare homozygotes (P = 0.009). For a MIC-1 SNP (rs1227732), the HR comparing carriers of at least one copy of the minor allele to wild-type homozygotes was 0.54 (99% CI: 0.34, 0.87). Only the MIC-1 SNP remained significant after additional adjustment for treatment. No significant associations were observed for common haplotypes and PCa mortality. This study highlights the importance of studies of PCa mortality because risk factors for incidence and mortality may differ. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(6):1859–63)

  J. R Stark , G Judson , J. F Alderete , V Mundodi , A. S Kucknoor , E. L Giovannucci , E. A Platz , S Sutcliffe , K Fall , T Kurth , J Ma , M. J Stampfer and L. A. Mucci
  Background

A recent nested case–control study found that the presence of antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis, a common nonviral sexually transmitted infection, was positively associated with subsequent incidence of prostate cancer. We confirmed these findings in an independent population and related serostatus for antibodies against T vaginalis to prostate cancer incidence and mortality.

Methods

We conducted a case–control study nested within the Physicians’ Health Study that included 673 case subjects with prostate cancer and 673 individually matched control subjects who had available plasma samples. Plasma from blood samples collected at baseline was assayed for antibodies against T vaginalis with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) of incident prostate cancer, extraprostatic prostate cancer, and cancer that would ultimately progress to bony metastases or prostate cancer–specific death.

Results

Although not statistically significant, the magnitude of the association between T vaginalis–seropositive status and overall prostate cancer risk (OR = 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.94 to 1.61) was similar to that reported previously. Furthermore, a seropositive status was associated with statistically significantly increased risks of extraprostatic prostate cancer (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.08 to 4.37) and of cancer that would ultimately progress to bony metastases or prostate cancer–specific death (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.37 to 5.28).

Conclusions

This large prospective case–control study obtained further support for an association between a seropositive status for antibodies against T vaginalis and the risk of prostate cancer, with statistically significant associations identified for the risk of extraprostatic prostate cancer and for clinically relevant, potentially lethal prostate cancer.

 
 
 
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