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Articles by J. Michael Ryan
Total Records ( 5 ) for J. Michael Ryan
  J. Michael Ryan , Greg Schneider and J. Steven Jacobsen
  Not Available
  Ronald Black , Barry Greenberg , J. Michael Ryan , Holly Posner , Jeffrey Seeburger , Joan Amatniek , Malca Resnick , Richard Mohs , David S. Miller , Daniel Saumier , Maria C. Carrillo and Yaakov Stern
  The assessment of patient outcomes in clinical trials of new therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD) continues to evolve. In addition to assessing drugs for symptomatic relief, an increasing number of trials are focusing on potential disease-modifying agents. Moreover, participants with AD are being studied earlier in their course of disease. As a result, the limitations of current outcome measures have become more apparent, as has the need for better instruments. In recognition of the need to review and possibly revise current assessment measures, the Alzheimer's Association, in cooperation with industry leaders and academic investigators, convened a Research Roundtable meeting devoted to scales as outcome measures for AD clinical trials. The meeting included a discussion of methodological issues in the use of scales in AD clinical trials, including cross-cultural issues. Specific topics related to the use of cognitive, functional, global, and neuropsychiatric scales were also presented. Speakers also addressed academic and industry initiatives for pooling data from untreated and placebo-treated patients in clinical trials. A number of regulatory topics were also discussed with agency representatives. Panel discussions highlighted areas of controversy, in an effort to gain consensus on various topics.
  Constantine G. Lyketsos , Maria C. Carrillo , J. Michael Ryan , Ara S. Khachaturian , Paula Trzepacz , Joan Amatniek , Jesse Cedarbaum , Robert Brashear and David S. Miller
  Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are core features of Alzheimer‘s disease and related dementias. Once thought to emerge primarily in people with late-stage disease, these symptoms are currently known to manifest commonly in very early disease and in prodromal phases, such as mild cognitive impairment. Despite decades of research, reliable treatments for dementia-associated NPS have not been found, and those that are in widespread use present notable risks for people using these medications. An Alzheimer‘s Association Research Roundtable was convened in the spring of 2010 to review what is known about NPS in Alzheimer‘s disease, to discuss classification and underlying neuropathogenesis and vulnerabilities, and to formulate recommendations for new approaches to tailored therapeutics.
  Barry D. Greenberg , Maria C. Carrillo , J. Michael Ryan , Michael Gold , Kim Gallagher , Michael Grundman , Robert M. Berman , Timothy Ashwood and Eric R. Siemers
  Over the past 30 years, many drugs have been studied as possible treatments for Alzheimer‘s disease, but only four have demonstrated sufficient efficacy to be approved as treatments, of which three are in the same class. This lack of success has raised questions both in the pharmaceutical industry and academia about the future of Alzheimer‘s disease therapy. The high cost and low success rate of drug development across many disease areas can be attributed, in large part, to late-stage clinical failures (Schachter and Ramoni, Nat Rev Drug Discov 2007;6:107–8). Thus, identifying in phase II, or preferably phase I, drugs that are likely to fail would have a dramatic impact on the costs associated with developing new drugs. With this in mind, the Alzheimer‘s Association convened a Research Roundtable on June 23 and 24, 2011, in Washington, DC, bringing together scientists from academia, industry, and government regulatory agencies to discuss strategies for improving the probability of phase II trial results predicting success when considering the go/no-go decision-making process leading to the initiation of phase III.
  Maria C. Carrillo , H. Robert Brashear , Veronika Logovinsky , J. Michael Ryan , Howard H. Feldman , Eric R. Siemers , Susan Abushakra , Dean M. Hartley , Ronald C. Petersen , Ara S. Khachaturian and Reisa A. Sperling
  Current research including the basic biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) provides a foundation to explore whether our current state of knowledge is sufficient to initiate prevention studies and allow us to believe prevention of AD is possible. Current research and recently revised criteria for the diagnosis of AD by the National Institutes on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association suggest a continuum of disease from preclinical asymptomatic to symptomatic Alzheimer's dementia. In light of these revised criteria, the possibility of secondary prevention and even primary prevention is under discussion. The Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable convened a meeting to discuss the rationale and feasibility of conducting secondary prevention trials in AD.
 
 
 
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