Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by J. H Olsen
Total Records ( 2 ) for J. H Olsen
  J. H Olsen , T Moller , H Anderson , F Langmark , R Sankila , L Tryggvadottir , J. F Winther , C Rechnitzer , G Jonmundsson , J Christensen and S. Garwicz
  Background

The pattern of cancer in long-term survivors from childhood cancer has not been investigated comprehensively.

Methods

We obtained a cohort of 47 697 children and adolescents aged 0–19 years with cancer as defined by the country-wide cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden during 1943–2005. Cohort members were followed through age 79 years for subsequent primary cancers notified to the registries, and the age-specific risk pattern of the survivors was compared with that of the national populations using country and sex standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). We used a multiplicative Poisson regression model to estimate relative risk of cancer for attained age, with adjustment for calendar period and age at diagnosis of primary cancer. We also calculated excess absolute risk (EAR) attributable to status as childhood cancer survivor and determined the cumulative incidence of second primary cancer as a function of attained age for three subcohorts defined by period of treatment for childhood cancer.

Results

A total of 1180 asynchronous second primary cancers were observed in 1088 persons, yielding an overall SIR of 3.3 (95% confidence interval = 3.1 to 3.5). The relative risk was statistically significantly increased in all age groups, even for cohort members approaching 70 years of age. The EAR for second primary cancer among survivors increased gradually from one additional case per 1000 person-years of observation in early life to six additional cases per 1000 person-years in the age group 60–69 years. For children treated in the prechemotherapy era (1943–1959), the cumulative risk for a second primary cancer reached 18%, 34%, and 48% at ages 60, 70, and 80 years, respectively. The age-specific incidence rates were highest for cohort members treated in the era of intensive, multiple-agent chemotherapy (1975–2005).

Conclusion

Survivors of childhood cancer have a persistent excess risk for a second primary cancer throughout their lives, accompanied by continuous changes in the risk of cancers at specific sites.

  J. L Bernstein , R. W Haile , M Stovall , J. D Boice , R. E Shore , B Langholz , D. C Thomas , L Bernstein , C. F Lynch , J. H Olsen , K. E Malone , L Mellemkjaer , A. L Borresen Dale , B. S Rosenstein , S. N Teraoka , A. T Diep , S. A Smith , M Capanu , A. S Reiner , X Liang , R. A Gatti , P Concannon and and the WECARE Study Collaborative Group
  Background

Ionizing radiation is a known mutagen and an established breast carcinogen. The ATM gene is a key regulator of cellular responses to the DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. We investigated whether genetic variants in ATM play a clinically significant role in radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in women.

Methods

The Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology Study is an international population-based case–control study nested within a cohort of 52 536 survivors of unilateral breast cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 2000. The 708 case subjects were women with contralateral breast cancer, and the 1397 control subjects were women with unilateral breast cancer matched to the case subjects on age, follow-up time, registry reporting region, and race and/or ethnicity. All women were interviewed and underwent full mutation screening of the entire ATM gene. Complete medical treatment history information was collected, and for all women who received radiotherapy, the radiation dose to the contralateral breast was reconstructed using radiotherapy records and radiation measurements. Rate ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using multivariable conditional logistic regression. All P values are two-sided.

Results

Among women who carried a rare ATM missense variant (ie, one carried by <1% of the study participants) that was predicted to be deleterious, those who were exposed to radiation (mean radiation exposure = 1.2 Gy, SD = 0.7) had a statistically significantly higher risk of contralateral breast cancer compared with unexposed women who carried the wild-type genotype (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2 to 6.5; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.4 to 8.0) or compared with unexposed women who carried the same predicted deleterious missense variant (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.6 to 17.3; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 5.8, 95% CI = 1.8 to 19.0; Ptrend = .044).

Conclusions

Women who carry rare deleterious ATM missense variants and who are treated with radiation may have an elevated risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. However, the rarity of these deleterious missense variants in human populations implies that ATM mutations could account for only a small portion of second primary breast cancers.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility