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Articles by J. H Bae
Total Records ( 3 ) for J. H Bae
  J. H Shin , J. H Bae , A Lee , C. K Jung , H. W Yim , J. S Park and K. Y. Lee
  Objective

Colorectal adenocarcinoma, the most common tumor that metastasizes to the ovary, is often difficult to distinguish from primary ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma (POMA). Obtaining the correct diagnosis is difficult but crucial to treatment and prognosis.

Methods

We evaluated the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), CDX2, CEA, MUC2, MUC5AC and -methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) in 22 POMAs and 41 metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas (MCAOs) involving ovaries.

Results

MCAOs, in contrast with POMAs, were almost always negative for MUC5 (97.6%), often negative for CK7 (82.9%), focal or diffuse positive for CDX2 (73.2%), diffuse positive for CK20 (65.9%), focal or diffuse positive for MUC2 (51.2%), diffuse positive for CEA (41.5%) and negative for AMACR (41.5%). We therefore considered CK7 (–), CK20 (diffuse +), CDX2 (+) and MUC2 (+) to be colonic markers and regarded cases with expression of more than two colonic markers as MCAO, those with no expression of colonic markers as POMA and those with expression of one colonic marker as indeterminate. Using CK7/CK20/CDX2/MUC2, 82.5% of the cases were correctly classified, 6.3% were misclassified and 6.3% were indeterminate.

Conclusion

CK7, CK20, CDX2 and MUC2 IHC staining is a useful adjunctive diagnostic tool to differentiate MCAOs from POMAs, in addition to clinical history and gross and microscopic findings.

  J. H Ahn , J. H Bae , Y. S Lee , K Choi , T. S Bae and J. H. Wang
  Background

An anterolateral approach to the tibial tunnel of posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is used to reduce the sharpness of the graft-tunnel angle, the so-called killer turn effect. However, with the anterolateral approach, the tunnel might be widened into an ovoid shape because of the small angle between the tunnel and the anterolateral cortex.

Hypothesis

The fixation strength of the posterior cruciate ligament graft in the tibial tunnel will be weaker in the anterolateral approach compared with the anteromedial approach.

Study Design

Controlled laboratory study.

Methods

Twenty paired cadaveric tibias were used. Tibial tunnels were made using following approaches: an anteromedial approach for 10 tibias and an anterolateral approach for 10 tibias. The anterior cortex-tunnel angle and the diameter of the tunnel entrance were measured by 2-dimensional computed tomographic scans. After fixation of the Achilles tendon allograft with a biodegradable screw, the maximal strength of the graft at failure was measured using a materials testing machine.

Results

The mean cortex-tunnel angle was 47.5° ± 9.3° in the anteromedial approach group and 28.3° ± 7.4° in the anterolateral approach group. The mean long diameter of the tunnels in the anteromedial approach group was 10.6 ± 1.0 mm and in the anterolateral approach group it was 14.0 ± 1.5 mm. These two parameters showed statistically significant differences between the 2 groups (P < .01). The mean maximum load at failure for the anteromedial approach group was 385.4 ± 139.7 N, and for the anterolateral approach group it was 225.1 ± 144.1 N. This difference was statistically significant (P = .021).

Conclusion

The anterolateral approach resulted in a tunnel with a wider entrance, a more acute cortex-tunnel angle, and a lower maximal load at failure compared with tunnels created using the anteromedial approach.

Clinical Relevance

The use of additional fixation methods, such as post ties or ligament washers and screws, should be considered when using an anterolateral approach for tibial tunnel of posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  J. H Wang , J. H Bae , H. C Lim , W. Y Shon , C. W Kim and J. W. Cho
  Background

High tibial osteotomy can affect the posterior tibial slope in the sagittal plane because of the triangular configuration of the proximal tibia. However, the effect of the location of cortical hinge on posterior tibial slope has not been previously described.

Hypothesis

Posterolateral location of the cortical hinge will increase posterior tibial slope after medial open wedge osteotomy, and lateral location of the cortical hinge will not affect the change of the posterior tibial slope.

Study Design

Controlled laboratory study.

Methods

We performed incomplete valgus open wedge osteotomy on 12 paired knees of 6 fresh-frozen human cadavers (age, 63.4 ± 7.5 years) using an OrthoPilot navigation system. The left and right legs of each specimen were randomly assigned to a posterolateral (group A) or a lateral (group B) cortical hinge group. Changes in mean medial proximal tibial angle, posterior tibial slope, and opening wedge angle were measured and compared after surgery.

Results

In group A, mean medial proximal tibial angle changed from 84.37° ± 2.8° to 93.48° ± 3.06° (P = .028); mean posterior tibial slope increased significantly from 8.71° ± 0.81° to 12.16° ± 0.84° (P = .031); and mean wedge angle was 1.92° ± 0.46°. In group B, mean medial proximal tibial angle changed from 82.98° ± 2.53° to 90.89° ± 3.25° (P = .027); mean posterior tibial slope changed from 9.19° ± 1.11° to 9.78° ± 1.27° (P = .029); and mean wedge angle was 7.25° ± 0.72°.

Conclusion

The location of the intact cortical hinge affects the posterior tibia slope. During medial open wedge osteotomy, the change of posterior tibial slope was larger in the posterolateral than in the lateral cortical hinge group.

Clinical Relevance

To prevent the unintentional increase of the posterior tibial slope, special attention should be paid to locate the intact cortical hinge on the lateral, not the posterolateral, side of the tibia.

 
 
 
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