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Articles by J. E. Van Eyk
Total Records ( 4 ) for J. E. Van Eyk
  Z Fu , M Wang , M Gucek , J Zhang , J Wu , L Jiang , R. E Monticone , B Khazan , R Telljohann , J Mattison , S Sheng , R. N Cole , G Spinetti , G Pintus , L Liu , F. D Kolodgie , R Virmani , H Spurgeon , D. K Ingram , A. D Everett , E. G Lakatta and J. E. Van Eyk
 

Advancing age induces aortic wall thickening that results from the concerted effects of numerous signaling proteins, many of which have yet to be identified. To search for novel proteins associated with aortic wall thickening, we have performed a comprehensive quantitative proteomic study to analyze aortic proteins from young (8 months) and old (30 months) rats and identified 50 proteins that significantly change in abundance with aging. One novel protein, the milk fat globule protein epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8), increases 2.3-fold in abundance in old aorta. Transcription and translation analysis demonstrated that aortic MFG-E8 mRNA and protein levels increase with aging in several mammalian species including humans. Dual immunolabeling shows that MFG-E8 colocalizes with both angiotensin II and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 within vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of the thickened aged aortic wall. Exposure of early passage VSMCs from young aorta to angiotensin II markedly increases MFG-E8 and enhances invasive capacity to levels observed in VSMCs from old rats. Treatment of VSMCs with MFG-E8 increases MCP-1 expression and VSMCs invasion that are inhibited by the MCP-1 receptor blocker vCCI. Silencing MFG-E8 RNA substantially reduces MFG-E8 expression and VSMCs invasion capacity. The data indicate that arterial MFG-E8 significantly increases with aging and is a pivotal relay element within the angiotensin II/MCP-1/VSMC invasion signaling cascade. Thus, targeting of MFG-E8 within this signaling axis pathway is a potential novel therapy for the prevention and treatment of the age-associated vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  L. A Kane , M. J Youngman , R. E Jensen and J. E. Van Eyk
 

Rationale: We previously discovered several phosphorylations to the β subunit of the mitochondrial F1Fo ATP synthase complex in isolated rabbit myocytes on adenosine treatment, an agent that induces cardioprotection. The role of these phosphorylations is unknown.

Objective: The present study focuses on the functional consequences of phosphorylation of the ATP synthase complex β subunit by generating nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic analogs in a model system, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Methods and Results: The 4 amino acid residues with homology in yeast (T58, S213, T262, and T318) were studied with respect to growth, complex and supercomplex formation, and enzymatic activity (ATPase rate). The most striking mutant was the T262 site, for which the phosphomimetic (T262E) abolished activity, whereas the nonphosphorylatable strain (T262A) had an ATPase rate equivalent to wild type. Although T262E, like all of the β subunit mutants, was able to form the intact complex (F1Fo), this strain lacked a free F1 component found in wild-type and had a corresponding increase of lower-molecular-weight forms of the protein, indicating an assembly/stability defect. In addition, the ATPase activity was reduced but not abolished with the phosphomimetic mutation at T58, a site that altered the formation/maintenance of dimers of the F1Fo ATP synthase complex.

Conclusions: Taken together, these data show that pseudophosphorylation of specific amino acid residues can have separate and distinctive effects on the F1Fo ATP synthase complex, suggesting the possibility that several of the phosphorylations observed in the rabbit heart can have structural and functional consequences to the F1Fo ATP synthase complex.

  G Agnetti , N Kaludercic , L. A Kane , S. T Elliott , Y Guo , K Chakir , D Samantapudi , N Paolocci , G. F Tomaselli , D. A Kass and J. E. Van Eyk
 

Background— Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves chamber mechanoenergetics and morbidity and mortality of patients manifesting heart failure with ventricular dyssynchrony; however, little is known about the molecular changes underlying CRT benefits. We hypothesized that mitochondria may play an important role because of their involvement in energy production.

Methods and Results— Mitochondria isolated from the left ventricle in a canine model of dyssynchronous or resynchronized (CRT) heart failure were analyzed by a classical, gel-based, proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that 31 mitochondrial proteins where changed when controlling the false discovery rate at 30%. Key enzymes in anaplerotic pathways, such as pyruvate carboxylation and branched-chain amino acid oxidation, were increased. These concerted changes, along with others, suggested that CRT may increase the pool of Krebs cycle intermediates and fuel oxidative phosphorylation. Nearly 50% of observed changes pertained to subunits of the respiratory chain. ATP synthase-β subunit of complex V was less degraded, and its phosphorylation modulated by CRT was associated with increased formation (2-fold, P=0.004) and specific activity (+20%, P=0.05) of the mature complex. The importance of these modifications was supported by coordinated changes in mitochondrial chaperones and proteases. CRT increased the mitochondrial respiratory control index with tightened coupling when isolated mitochondria were reexposed to substrates for both complex I (glutamate and malate) and complex II (succinate), an effect likely related to ATP synthase subunit modifications and complex quantity and activity.

Conclusions— CRT potently affects both the mitochondrial proteome and the performance associated with improved cardiac function.

  Y Lin , Q Fu , J Zhu , J. M Miller and J. E. Van Eyk
  BACKGROUND:

With myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac troponin is released from the heart into circulation, where it can be detected with immunoassays independently quantifying cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or cTnT. There is, however, no single immunoassay that sequentially probes the posttranslational modification status of cTnI or directly characterizes whether circulating cTnI is bound to cTnC and/or cTnT. Here we describe the development of a qualitative immunoassay to directly probe the primary and ternary structure of circulating cTnI through diffractive optics technology (dotLab® System, Axela).

METHODS:

Anti-cTnI antibody 8I-7 was immobilized on a patterned sensor to capture cTnI. One or more detector antibodies were sequentially introduced to probe for amino acid sequence integrity or phosphorylation status of cTnI, or its association with cTnC and/or cTnT. Respective immunocaptures were recorded as real-time diffractive intensities (DIs), and the DI differences were analyzed. Each immunodetection was independent of the others but was done in a single sequential assay.

RESULTS:

This diffraction-based immunoassay successfully characterized cTnI. The unamplified assay determined whether cTnI was degraded at N-terminus and/or C-terminus or phosphorylated. Sequential application of multiple detector antibodies without an antibody-stripping step enables real-time interrogation of 5 different epitopes of cTnI, or direct detection of the cTn complex (cTnI–cTnC–cTnT) in a single sequential assay. Finally, this assay was optimized with amplification to directly detect circulating cTnI bound to cTnC and cTnT in serum from an MI patient.

CONCLUSIONS:

The dot® Immunoassay is the first qualitative sequential immunoassay to address the direct interactions of the troponin subunits and various modified forms of cTnI.

 
 
 
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