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Articles by J. E Ferrie
Total Records ( 2 ) for J. E Ferrie
  J. E Ferrie , A Singh Manoux , A Shortt , P Martikainen , J Head , M Marmot , D Gimeno , R De Vogli , M Elovainio and M. J Shipley
 

Background Little is known about the associations between non-response to follow-up surveys and mortality, or differences in these associations by socioeconomic position in studies with repeat data collections.

Methods The Whitehall II study of socioeconomic inequalities in health provided response status from five data collection surveys; Phase 1 (1985–88, n = 10 308), Phase 5 (1997–99, n = 6533), and all-cause mortality to 2006. Odd-numbered phases included a medical examination in addition to a questionnaire.

Results Non-response to baseline and to follow-up phases that included a medical examination was associated with a doubling of the mortality hazard in analyses adjusted for age and sex. Compared with complete responders, responders who missed one or more phases, but completed the last possible phase before they died, had a 38% excess risk of mortality. However, those who missed one or more phases including the last possible phase before death had an excess risk of 127%. There was no evidence that these associations differed by socioeconomic position.

Conclusion In studies with repeat data collections, non-response to follow-up is associated with the same doubling of the mortality risk as non-response to baseline; an association that is not modified by socioeconomic position.

  T. N Akbaraly , E. J Brunner , J. E Ferrie , M. G Marmot , M Kivimaki and A. Singh Manoux
 

Background

Studies of diet and depression have focused primarily on individual nutrients.

Aims

To examine the association between dietary patterns and depression using an overall diet approach.

Method

Analyses were carried on data from 3486 participants (26.2% women, mean age 55.6 years) from the Whitehall II prospective cohort, in which two dietary patterns were identified: ‘whole food’ (heavily loaded by vegetables, fruits and fish) and ‘processed food’ (heavily loaded by sweetened desserts, fried food, processed meat, refined grains and high-fat dairy products). Self-reported depression was assessed 5 years later using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies – Depression (CES–D) scale.

Results

After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest tertile of the whole food pattern had lower odds of CES–D depression (OR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.56–0.99) than those in the lowest tertile. In contrast, high consumption of processed food was associated with an increased odds of CES–D depression (OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.11–2.23).

Conclusions

In middle-aged participants, a processed food dietary pattern is a risk factor for CES–D depression 5 years later, whereas a whole food pattern is protective.

 
 
 
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