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Articles by J. C. M Witteman
Total Records ( 5 ) for J. C. M Witteman
  R. S Newson , K Hek , H. J Luijendijk , A Hofman , J. C. M Witteman and H. Tiemeier
 

Context  Depression is a prominent concern for older adults; therefore, it is important to identify causal mechanisms so that prevention and treatment strategies can be developed. The vascular depression hypothesis proposes that vascular factors precede the onset of depression in older adults. However, although cross-sectional associations have been established, owing to a lack of objective assessments and longitudinal data, the validity and temporal nature of this relationship is unclear.

Objective  To examine whether atherosclerosis, an asymptomatic subclinical indicator of vascular burden, increases the risk of developing depression in older adults.

Design  Prospective, population-based study.

Setting  Set within the Rotterdam study, participants were assessed on objective measures of generalized atherosclerosis at baseline (1997-1999) and followed up for an average of 6 years for incident depression.

Participants  The baseline sample consisted of 3564 participants (56% female) with a mean age of 72 years who initially did not have depression or dementia.

Main Outcome Measures  Depression was categorized into symptoms or syndromes and assessed in a multidimensional manner from physician and mental health specialist reports, pharmacy records (antidepressant usage), a clinical interview, and self-report.

Results  During 21 083 person-years, 429 incidents of depressive symptoms and 197 incidents of depressive syndromes occurred. Individual atherosclerotic measures and a composite measure were not predictive of incident depressive symptoms (composite measure hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.05) or incident depressive syndromes (composite measure hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.16). An a priori power analysis indicated a sufficient sample size ( = .05; 0.95 power).

Conclusions  Atherosclerosis does not appear to increase the risk of incident depression in older adults. These findings do not support the vascular depression hypothesis and, alternatively, taking findings from prior studies into account, suggest either that depression contributes to vascular burden or that both result from an underlying biological substrate.

  N. L Smith , M. H Chen , A Dehghan , D. P Strachan , S Basu , N Soranzo , C Hayward , I Rudan , M Sabater Lleal , J. C Bis , M. P. M de Maat , A Rumley , X Kong , Q Yang , F. M. K Williams , V Vitart , H Campbell , A Malarstig , K. L Wiggins , C. M Van Duijn , W. L McArdle , J. S Pankow , A. D Johnson , A Silveira , B McKnight , A. G Uitterlinden , Aleksic Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium; , J. B Meigs , A Peters , W Koenig , M Cushman , S Kathiresan , J. I Rotter , E. G Bovill , A Hofman , E Boerwinkle , G. H Tofler , J. F Peden , B. M Psaty , F Leebeek , A. R Folsom , M. G Larson , T. D Spector , A. F Wright , J. F Wilson , A Hamsten , T Lumley , J. C. M Witteman , W Tang and C. J. O'Donnell
 

Background— Plasma levels of coagulation factors VII (FVII), VIII (FVIII), and von Willebrand factor (vWF) influence risk of hemorrhage and thrombosis. We conducted genome-wide association studies to identify new loci associated with plasma levels.

Methods and Results— The setting of the study included 5 community-based studies for discovery comprising 23 608 European-ancestry participants: Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study, Cardiovascular Health Study, British 1958 Birth Cohort, Framingham Heart Study, and Rotterdam Study. All subjects had genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) scans and at least 1 phenotype measured: FVII activity/antigen, FVIII activity, and vWF antigen. Each study used its genotype data to impute to HapMap SNPs and independently conducted association analyses of hemostasis measures using an additive genetic model. Study findings were combined by meta-analysis. Replication was conducted in 7604 participants not in the discovery cohort. For FVII, 305 SNPs exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold of 5.0x10–8 and comprised 5 loci on 5 chromosomes: 2p23 (smallest P value 6.2x10–24), 4q25 (3.6x10–12), 11q12 (2.0x10–10), 13q34 (9.0x10–259), and 20q11.2 (5.7x10–37). Loci were within or near genes, including 4 new candidate genes and F7 (13q34). For vWF, 400 SNPs exceeded the threshold and marked 8 loci on 6 chromosomes: 6q24 (1.2x10–22), 8p21 (1.3x10–16), 9q34 (<5.0x10–324), 12p13 (1.7x10–32), 12q23 (7.3x10–10), 12q24.3 (3.8x10–11), 14q32 (2.3x10–10), and 19p13.2 (1.3x10–9). All loci were within genes, including 6 new candidate genes, as well as ABO (9q34) and VWF (12p13). For FVIII, 5 loci were identified and overlapped vWF findings. Nine of the 10 new findings were replicated.

Conclusions— New genetic associations were discovered outside previously known biological pathways and may point to novel prevention and treatment targets of hemostasis disorders.

  A. C Morrison , J. F Felix , L. A Cupples , N. L Glazer , L. R Loehr , A Dehghan , S Demissie , J. C Bis , W. D Rosamond , Y. S Aulchenko , Y. A Wang , T Haritunians , A. R Folsom , F Rivadeneira , E. J Benjamin , T Lumley , D Couper , B. H Stricker , C. J O'Donnell , K. M Rice , P. P Chang , A Hofman , D Levy , J. I Rotter , E. R Fox , A. G Uitterlinden , T. J Wang , B. M Psaty , J. T Willerson , C. M van Duijn , E Boerwinkle , J. C. M Witteman , R. S Vasan and N. L. Smith
  Background—

Prognosis and survival are significant concerns for individuals with heart failure (HF). To better understand the pathophysiology of HF prognosis, the association between 2 366 858 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and all-cause mortality was evaluated among individuals with incident HF from 4 community-based prospective cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Rotterdam Study.

Methods and Results—

Participants were 2526 individuals of European ancestry and 466 individuals of African ancestry who experienced an incident HF event during follow-up in the respective cohorts. Within each study, the association between genetic variants and time to mortality among individuals with HF was assessed by Cox proportional hazards models that included adjustment for sex and age at the time of the HF event. Prospective fixed-effect meta-analyses were conducted for the 4 study populations of European ancestry (N=1645 deaths) and for the 2 populations of African ancestry (N=281 deaths). Genome-wide significance was set at P=5.0x10–7. Meta-analytic findings among individuals of European ancestry revealed 1 genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 3p22 in an intron of CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing 7 (CMTM7, P=3.2x10–7). Eight additional loci in individuals of European ancestry and 4 loci in individuals of African ancestry were identified by high-signal SNPs (P<1.0x10–5) but did not meet genome-wide significance.

Conclusions—

This study identified a novel locus associated with all-cause mortality among individuals of European ancestry with HF. This finding warrants additional investigation, including replication, in other studies of HF.

  N. L Smith , J. F Felix , A. C Morrison , S Demissie , N. L Glazer , L. R Loehr , L. A Cupples , A Dehghan , T Lumley , W. D Rosamond , W Lieb , F Rivadeneira , J. C Bis , A. R Folsom , E Benjamin , Y. S Aulchenko , T Haritunians , D Couper , J Murabito , Y. A Wang , B. H Stricker , J. S Gottdiener , P. P Chang , T. J Wang , K. M Rice , A Hofman , S. R Heckbert , E. R Fox , C. J O'Donnell , A. G Uitterlinden , J. I Rotter , J. T Willerson , D Levy , C. M van Duijn , B. M Psaty , J. C. M Witteman , E Boerwinkle and R. S. Vasan
  Background—

Although genetic factors contribute to the onset of heart failure (HF), no large-scale genome-wide investigation of HF risk has been published to date. We have investigated the association of 2 478 304 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with incident HF by meta-analyzing data from 4 community-based prospective cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Rotterdam Study.

Methods and Results—

Eligible participants for these analyses were of European or African ancestry and free of clinical HF at baseline. Each study independently conducted genome-wide scans and imputed data to the 2.5 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms in HapMap. Within each study, Cox proportional hazards regression models provided age- and sex-adjusted estimates of the association between each variant and time to incident HF. Fixed-effect meta-analyses combined results for each single-nucleotide polymorphism from the 4 cohorts to produce an overall association estimate and P value. A genome-wide significance P value threshold was set a priori at 5.0x10–7. During a mean follow-up of 11.5 years, 2526 incident HF events (12%) occurred in 20 926 European-ancestry participants. The meta-analysis identified a genome-wide significant locus at chromosomal position 15q22 (1.4x10–8), which was 58.8 kb from USP3. Among 2895 African-ancestry participants, 466 incident HF events (16%) occurred during a mean follow-up of 13.7 years. One genome-wide significant locus was identified at 12q14 (6.7x10–8), which was 6.3 kb from LRIG3.

Conclusions—

We identified 2 loci that were associated with incident HF and exceeded genome-wide significance. The findings merit replication in other community-based settings of incident HF.

  L Ay , V. A. A Van Houten , E. A. P Steegers , A Hofman , J. C. M Witteman , V. W. V Jaddoe and A. C. S. Hokken Koelega
 

Objectives: The objectives of the study was to examine which parental, fetal, and postnatal characteristics are associated with fat and lean mass at the age of 6 months and examine the effect of growth (catch-down, catch-up) in fetal life and early infancy on fat and lean mass.

Design: This study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a prospective cohort study from early fetal life onward. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 252 infants at 6 months. Parental, fetal, and postnatal data were collected by physical and fetal ultrasound examinations and questionnaires.

Results: Children with fetal catch-up in weight (gain in weight sd score >0.67) in the second trimester tended to have a higher fat mass percentage [FM(%)] at 6 months of age, whereas children with fetal catch-down in weight had a lower FM(%) compared with nonchangers. In the third trimester, both catch-up and catch-down in weight were associated with an increase in FM(%) at 6 months. Children with catch-down in the third trimester had a greater risk for postnatal catch-up in weight greater than 0.67 sd score. Birth weight and weight at 6 wk were positively associated with fat mass at 6 months. Postnatal catch-up in weight within 6 wk after birth had the highest association with total and truncal FM(%) at 6 months. Total and truncal FM were higher in girls.

Conclusion: Catch-down in weight in the third trimester was strongly associated with postnatal catch-up within 6 wk after birth, and both were associated with an increase in fat mass at the age of 6 months. Our study shows that fetal as well as postnatal growth patterns are associated with body composition in early childhood.

 
 
 
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