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Articles by J Walker
Total Records ( 2 ) for J Walker
  J Stone , A Carson , R Duncan , R Coleman , R Roberts , C Warlow , C Hibberd , G Murray , R Cull , A Pelosi , J Cavanagh , K Matthews , R Goldbeck , R Smyth , J Walker , A.D MacMahon and M. Sharpe
 

It has been previously reported that a substantial proportion of newly referred neurology out-patients have symptoms that are considered by the assessing neurologist as unexplained by ‘organic disease’. There has however been much controversy about how often such patients subsequently develop a disease diagnosis that, with hindsight, would have explained the symptoms. We aimed to determine in a large sample of new neurology out-patients: (i) what proportion are assessed as having symptoms unexplained by disease and the diagnoses given to them; and (ii) how often a neurological disorder emerged which, with hindsight, explained the original symptoms. We carried out a prospective cohort study of patients referred from primary care to National Health Service neurology clinics in Scotland, UK. Measures were: (i) the proportion of patients with symptoms rated by the assessing neurologist as ‘not at all’ or only ‘somewhat explained’ by ‘organic disease’ and the neurological diagnoses recorded at initial assessment; and (ii) the frequency of unexpected new diagnoses made over the following 18 months (according to the primary-care physician). One thousand four hundred and forty-four patients (30% of all new patients) were rated as having symptoms ‘not at all’ or only ‘somewhat explained’ by ‘organic disease’. The most common categories of diagnosis were: (i) organic neurological disease but with symptoms unexplained by it (26%); (ii) headache disorders (26%); and (iii) conversion symptoms (motor, sensory or non-epileptic attacks) (18%). At follow-up only 4 out of 1030 patients (0.4%) had acquired an organic disease diagnosis that was unexpected at initial assessment and plausibly the cause of the patients’ original symptoms. Eight patients had died at follow-up; five of whom had initial diagnoses of non-epileptic attacks. Seven other types of diagnostic change with very different implications to a ‘missed diagnosis’ were found and a new classification of diagnostic revision is presented. One-third of new neurology out-patients are assessed as having symptoms ‘unexplained by organic disease’. A new diagnosis, which with hindsight explained the original symptoms, rarely became apparent to the patient's primary care doctor in the 18 months following the initial hospital consultation.

  N.V Rajeshkumar , A. C Tan , E De Oliveira , C Womack , H Wombwell , S Morgan , M. V Warren , J Walker , T. P Green , A Jimeno , W. A Messersmith and M. Hidalgo
 

Purpose: To determine the efficacy of AZD0530, an orally active small molecule Src inhibitor, in human pancreatic cancer xenografts and to seek biomarkers predictive of activity.

Experimental Design: Sixteen patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts from the PancXenoBank collection at Johns Hopkins were treated with AZD0530 (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 28 days. Baseline gene expression profiles of differently expressed genes in 16 tumors by Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 gene array were used to predict AZD0530 sensitivity in an independent group of eight tumors using the K-Top Scoring Pairs (K-TSP) method.

Results: Three patient tumors of 16 were found to be sensitive to AZD0530, defined as tumor growth <50% compared with control tumors (100%). Western blot and/or immunohistochemistry results showed that AZD0530 administration resulted in the down-regulation of Src, FAK, p-FAK, p-paxillin, p-STAT-3, and XIAP in sensitive tumor xenografts compared with control tumors. The K-TSP classifier identified one gene pair (LRRC19 and IGFBP2) from the 16 training cases based on a decision rule. The classifier achieved 100% and 83.3% of sensitivity and specificity in an independent test set that consists of eight xenograft cases.

Conclusions: AZD0530 treatment significantly inhibits the tumor growth in a subset of human pancreatic tumor xenografts. One gene pair (LRRC19 and IGFBP2) identified by the K-TSP classifier has high predictive power for AZD0530 sensitivity, suggesting the potential for this gene pair as biomarker for pancreatic tumor sensitivity to AZD0530.

 
 
 
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