Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by J Sanchez
Total Records ( 3 ) for J Sanchez
  L. J Sobel , R Bansal , T. V Maia , J Sanchez , L Mazzone , K Durkin , J Liu , X Hao , I Ivanov , A Miller , L. L Greenhill and B. S. Peterson
  Objective

Disturbances in the basal ganglia portions of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits likely contribute to the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The authors examined the morphologic features of the basal ganglia nuclei (caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus) in children with ADHD.

Method

A total of 104 individuals (combined-type ADHD patients: N=47; healthy comparison subjects: N=57), aged 7 to 18 years, were examined in a cross-sectional case-control study using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging. Conventional volumes and the surface morphology for the basal ganglia were measured.

Results

Overall volumes were significantly smaller only in the putamen. Analysis of the morphological surfaces revealed significant inward deformations in each of the three nuclei, localized primarily in portions of these nuclei that are components of limbic, associative, and sensorimotor pathways in the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits in which these nuclei reside. The more prominent these inward deformations were in the patient group, the more severe the ADHD symptoms. Surface analyses also demonstrated significant outward deformations of all basal ganglia nuclei in the ADHD children treated with stimulants compared with those ADHD youth who were untreated. These stimulant-associated enlargements were in locations similar to the reduced volumes detected in the ADHD group relative to the comparison group. The outward deformations associated with stimulant medications attenuated the statistical effects of the primary group comparisons.

Conclusions

These findings potentially represent evidence of anatomical dysregulation in the circuitry of the basal ganglia in children with ADHD and suggest that stimulants may normalize morphological features of the basal ganglia in children with the disorder.

  L Di Biase , J. D Burkhardt , P Mohanty , J Sanchez , S Mohanty , R Horton , G. J Gallinghouse , S. M Bailey , J. D Zagrodzky , P Santangeli , S Hao , R Hongo , S Beheiry , S Themistoclakis , A Bonso , A Rossillo , A Corrado , A Raviele , A Al Ahmad , P Wang , J. E Cummings , R. A Schweikert , G Pelargonio , A Dello Russo , M Casella , P Santarelli , W. R Lewis and A. Natale
 

Background— Together with pulmonary veins, many extrapulmonary vein areas may be the source of initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is an underestimated site of initiation of atrial fibrillation. Here, we report the prevalence of triggers from the LAA and the best strategy for successful ablation.

Methods and Results— Nine hundred eighty-seven consecutive patients (29% paroxysmal, 71% nonparoxysmal) undergoing redo catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation were enrolled. Two hundred sixty-six patients (27%) showed firing from the LAA and became the study population. In 86 of 987 patients (8.7%; 5 paroxysmal, 81 nonparoxysmal), the LAA was found to be the only source of arrhythmia with no pulmonary veins or other extrapulmonary vein site reconnection. Ablation was performed either with focal lesion (n=56; group 2) or to achieve LAA isolation by placement of the circular catheter at the ostium of the LAA guided by intracardiac echocardiography (167 patients; group 3). In the remaining patients, LAA firing was not ablated (n=43; group 1). At the 12±3-month follow-up, 32 patients (74%) in group 1 had recurrence compared with 38 (68%) in group 2 and 25 (15%) in group 3 (P<0.001).

Conclusions— The LAA appears to be responsible for arrhythmias in 27% of patients presenting for repeat procedures. Isolation of the LAA could achieve freedom from atrial fibrillation in patients presenting for a repeat procedure when arrhythmias initiating from this structure are demonstrated.

  D Patel , P Mohanty , L Di Biase , M Shaheen , W. R Lewis , K Quan , J. E Cummings , P Wang , A Al Ahmad , P Venkatraman , E Nashawati , D Lakkireddy , R Schweikert , R Horton , J Sanchez , J Gallinghouse , S Hao , S Beheiry , D. S Cardinal , J Zagrodzky , R Canby , S Bailey , J. D Burkhardt and A. Natale
  Background—

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be associated with pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate if treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improved PVAI success rates.

Methods and Results—

From January 2004 to December 2007, 3000 consecutive patients underwent PVAI. Patients were screened for OSA and CPAP use. Six hundred forty (21.3%) patients had OSA. Patients with OSA had more procedural failures (P=0.024) and hematomas (P<0.001). Eight percent of the non-OSA paroxysmal atrial fibrillation patients had nonpulmonary vein antrum triggers (non-PV triggers) and posterior wall firing versus 20% of the OSA group (P<0.001). Nineteen percent of the non-OSA nonparoxysmal atrial fibrillation population had non-PV triggers versus 31% in the OSA group (P=0.001). At the end of the follow-up period (32±14 months), 79% of the non-CPAP and 68% of the CPAP group were free of atrial fibrillation (P=0.003). Not using CPAP in addition to having non-PV triggers strongly predicted procedural failure (hazard ratio, 8.81; P<0.001).

Conclusions—

OSA was an independent predictor for PVAI failure. Treatment with CPAP improved PVAI success rates. Patients not treated with CPAP in addition to having higher prevalence of non-PV triggers were 8 times more likely to fail the procedure.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility