Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by J Hart
Total Records ( 3 ) for J Hart
  K. D Pruitt , J Harrow , R. A Harte , C Wallin , M Diekhans , D. R Maglott , S Searle , C. M Farrell , J. E Loveland , B. J Ruef , E Hart , M. M Suner , M. J Landrum , B Aken , S Ayling , R Baertsch , J Fernandez Banet , J. L Cherry , V Curwen , M DiCuccio , M Kellis , J Lee , M. F Lin , M Schuster , A Shkeda , C Amid , G Brown , O Dukhanina , A Frankish , J Hart , B. L Maidak , J Mudge , M. R Murphy , T Murphy , J Rajan , B Rajput , L. D Riddick , C Snow , C Steward , D Webb , J. A Weber , L Wilming , W Wu , E Birney , D Haussler , T Hubbard , J Ostell , R Durbin and D. Lipman
 

Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but not identical representation of genes, transcripts, and proteins. The collaborative consensus coding sequence (CCDS) project tracks identical protein annotations on the reference mouse and human genomes with a stable identifier (CCDS ID), and ensures that they are consistently represented on the NCBI, Ensembl, and UCSC Genome Browsers. Importantly, the project coordinates on manually reviewing inconsistent protein annotations between sites, as well as annotations for which new evidence suggests a revision is needed, to progressively converge on a complete protein-coding set for the human and mouse reference genomes, while maintaining a high standard of reliability and biological accuracy. To date, the project has identified 20,159 human and 17,707 mouse consensus coding regions from 17,052 human and 16,893 mouse genes. Three evaluation methods indicate that the entries in the CCDS set are highly likely to represent real proteins, more so than annotations from contributing groups not included in CCDS. The CCDS database thus centralizes the function of identifying well-supported, identically-annotated, protein-coding regions.

  Temple The MGC Project Team , D. S Gerhard , R Rasooly , E. A Feingold , P. J Good , C Robinson , A Mandich , J. G Derge , J Lewis , D Shoaf , F. S Collins , W Jang , L Wagner , C. M Shenmen , L Misquitta , C. F Schaefer , K. H Buetow , T. I Bonner , L Yankie , M Ward , L Phan , A Astashyn , G Brown , C Farrell , J Hart , M Landrum , B. L Maidak , M Murphy , T Murphy , B Rajput , L Riddick , D Webb , J Weber , W Wu , K. D Pruitt , D Maglott , A Siepel , B Brejova , M Diekhans , R Harte , R Baertsch , J Kent , D Haussler , M Brent , L Langton , C. L.G Comstock , M Stevens , C Wei , M. J van Baren , K Salehi Ashtiani , R. R Murray , L Ghamsari , E Mello , C Lin , C Pennacchio , K Schreiber , N Shapiro , A Marsh , E Pardes , T Moore , A Lebeau , M Muratet , B Simmons , D Kloske , S Sieja , J Hudson , P Sethupathy , M Brownstein , N Bhat , J Lazar , H Jacob , C. E Gruber , M. R Smith , J McPherson , A. M Garcia , P. H Gunaratne , J Wu , D Muzny , R. A Gibbs , A. C Young , G. G Bouffard , R. W Blakesley , J Mullikin , E. D Green , M. C Dickson , A. C Rodriguez , J Grimwood , J Schmutz , R. M Myers , M Hirst , T Zeng , K Tse , M Moksa , M Deng , K Ma , D Mah , J Pang , G Taylor , E Chuah , A Deng , K Fichter , A Go , S Lee , J Wang , M Griffith , R Morin , R. A Moore , M Mayo , S Munro , S Wagner , S. J.M Jones , R. A Holt , M. A Marra , S Lu , S Yang , J Hartigan , M Graf , R Wagner , S Letovksy , J. C Pulido , K Robison , D Esposito , J Hartley , V. E Wall , R. F Hopkins , O Ohara and S. Wiemann
 

Since its start, the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) has sought to provide at least one full-protein-coding sequence cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene with a RefSeq transcript, and at least 6200 rat genes. The MGC cloning effort initially relied on random expressed sequence tag screening of cDNA libraries. Here, we summarize our recent progress using directed RT-PCR cloning and DNA synthesis. The MGC now contains clones with the entire protein-coding sequence for 92% of human and 89% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq (NM-accession) transcripts, and for 97% of human and 96% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq transcripts that have one or more PubMed publications, in addition to clones for more than 6300 rat genes. These high-quality MGC clones and their sequences are accessible without restriction to researchers worldwide.

  D. E Redziniak , J Hart , K Turman , G Treme , D Lunardini , M. D Miller and D. R. Diduch
  Background

The reported failure rate of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair varies widely. The influence of repair technique on failure rates and functional outcomes after arthroscopic cuff repair remains controversial.

Purpose

To determine the functional outcome of arthroscopic knotless fixation using the Opus AutoCuff device for rotator cuff repair and to compare our results with those reported in the literature.

Study Design

Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods

Fifty-six consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using an Opus AutoCuff device (Arthrocare, Sunnydale, California) with greater than 2 years’ follow-up. Subjective and objective clinical examinations were performed to include the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) rating scale, the visual analog scale (VAS), and the Tegner Activity Level scale.

Results

Forty-eight patients were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 26 months (range, 24–35 months). The mean UCLA shoulder score was 33.1 of 35 (SD, 2.89) possible points, and the mean ASES rating scale was 94.2 of 100 (SD, 7.76) compared with a mean preoperative score of 65.7 (P < .001). Postoperative UCLA shoulder scores had 42 of 45 (93.3%) patients with good and excellent results. The mean preoperative ASES pain score was 1.3 (SD, 1.0), and the mean postoperative score was 4.4 (SD, 1.0) (P < .001). The Tegner Activity Level scores demonstrated restoration of function to preinjury status. There were 3 failures (6.3%), 2 by anchor failure (1 with specific trauma), and 1 by rotator cuff retear, all requiring revision surgery.

Conclusion

Arthroscopic knotless suture fixation with the Opus AutoCuff device results in good to excellent results similar to those reported in the literature with conventional suture anchors.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility