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Articles by J Chang Claude
Total Records ( 4 ) for J Chang Claude
  B Frank , M Hoffmeister , N Klopp , T Illig , J Chang Claude and H. Brenner
 

RecQ helicase family members are involved in multiple DNA repair pathways, protecting the genome from incorrect recombination during mitosis and maintaining its stability. Deficiencies in genes encoding the RecQ helicases WRN and BLM lead to rare autosomal recessive diseases, Werner and Bloom syndromes, which have been implicated in early onset of aging, and predisposition to various types of cancer. We investigated associations of WRN, BLM and BLM-associated protein (BLAP75/RMI1) gene polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), genotyping WRN V114I (rs2230009), WRN L1074F (rs2725362), WRN C1367R (rs1346044), RMI1 S455N (rs1982151) and BLM P868L (rs11852361). A large population-based case–control study, including 1795 CRC cases and 1805 controls, found no evidence for an association between the selected allelic variants in DNA repair-related genes and CRC risk. However, we detected a significant association of BLM P868L with an increased rectal cancer risk (odds ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.64 and P = 0.04), suggesting a potential cancer-site specificity. This is the first study to analyze the associations between polymorphisms in WRN, BLM and RMI1 and CRC risk. Although none of them showed a significant association with CRC, the association of BLM P868L with rectal cancer risk requires further investigation.

  B Frank , M Hoffmeister , N Klopp , T Illig , J Chang Claude and H. Brenner
 

It is well known that ~90% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases originate from the constitutive activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. There is increasing evidence that genetic variation both in Wnt and apoptotic pathway genes affects CRC susceptibility and progression. This population-based case–control study, including 1795 CRC cases and 1805 controls, investigates the association between common, putative functional polymorphisms in DNFA5, HIF1A, NDRG1, PYGO1, SFRP2, SFRP4, WISP1 and WISP3 genes and CRC risk. We found no evidence for an association between the selected allelic variants and risk of CRC. Subsite analyses, however, revealed a significant association of HIF1A c.*191T>C with rectal cancer risk [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03–1.51, P = 0.03] comparing minor allele carriers with major allele homozygotes. In addition, homozygosity for the minor allele of SFRP4 P320T was significantly associated with rectal cancer risk (OR = 1.37, 95% CI, 1.06–1.79, P = 0.02) and early-stage CRC (OR = 1.33, 95% CI, 1.05–1.69, P = 0.02). This study does not support the hypothesis that Wnt signaling- and apoptosis-related polymorphisms contribute to CRC risk. However, our results provide evidence that CRC subsets may be affected. If confirmed, this knowledge may be used to assess individual susceptibility and to target potential measures of cancer prevention.

  H Song , S. J Ramus , S. K Kjaer , R. A DiCioccio , G Chenevix Trench , C. L Pearce , E Hogdall , A. S Whittemore , V McGuire , C Hogdall , J Blaakaer , A. H Wu , D. J Van Den Berg , D. O Stram , U Menon , A Gentry Maharaj , I. J Jacobs , P. M Webb , J Beesley , X Chen , The Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group the Australian Cancer (Ovarian) Study , J. A Doherty , J Chang Claude , S Wang Gohrke , M. T Goodman , G Lurie , P. J Thompson , M. E Carney , R. B Ness , K Moysich , E. L Goode , R. A Vierkant , J. M Cunningham , S Anderson , J. M Schildkraut , A Berchuck , E. S Iversen , P. G Moorman , M Garcia Closas , S Chanock , J Lissowska , L Brinton , H Anton Culver , A Ziogas , W. R Brewster , B. A.J Ponder , D. F Easton , S. A Gayther , P. D.P Pharoah and on behalf of the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC)
 

Because both ovarian and breast cancer are hormone-related and are known to have some predisposition genes in common, we evaluated 11 of the most significant hits (six with confirmed associations with breast cancer) from the breast cancer genome-wide association study for association with invasive ovarian cancer. Eleven SNPs were initially genotyped in 2927 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 4143 controls from six ovarian cancer case–control studies. Genotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared using a likelihood ratio test in a logistic regression model stratified by study. Initially, three SNPs (rs2107425 in MRPL23, rs7313833 in PTHLH, rs3803662 in TNRC9) were weakly associated with ovarian cancer risk and one SNP (rs4954956 in NXPH2) was associated with serous ovarian cancer in non-Hispanic white subjects (P-trend < 0.1). These four SNPs were then genotyped in an additional 4060 cases and 6308 controls from eight independent studies. Only rs4954956 was significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk both in the replication study and in combined analyses. This association was stronger for the serous histological subtype [per minor allele odds ratio (OR) 1.07 95% CI 1.01–1.13, P-trend = 0.02 for all types of ovarian cancer and OR 1.14 95% CI 1.07–1.22, P-trend = 0.00017 for serous ovarian cancer]. In conclusion, we found that rs4954956 was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, particularly for serous ovarian cancer. However, none of the six confirmed breast cancer susceptibility variants we tested was associated with ovarian cancer risk. Further work will be needed to identify the causal variant associated with rs4954956 or elucidate its function.

  R. L Milne , J Benitez , H Nevanlinna , T Heikkinen , K Aittomaki , C Blomqvist , J. I Arias , M. P Zamora , B Burwinkel , C. R Bartram , A Meindl , R. K Schmutzler , A Cox , I Brock , G Elliott , M. W. R Reed , M. C Southey , L Smith , A. B Spurdle , J. L Hopper , F. J Couch , J. E Olson , X Wang , Z Fredericksen , P Schurmann , M Bremer , P Hillemanns , T Dork , P Devilee , C. J van Asperen , R. A. E. M Tollenaar , C Seynaeve , P Hall , K Czene , J Liu , Y Li , S Ahmed , A. M Dunning , M Maranian , P. D. P Pharoah , G Chenevix Trench , J Beesley , kConFab Investigators , N. N Antonenkova , I. V Zalutsky , H Anton Culver , A Ziogas , H Brauch , C Justenhoven , Y. D Ko , S Haas , P. A Fasching , R Strick , A. B Ekici , M. W Beckmann , G. G Giles , G Severi , L Baglietto , D. R English , O Fletcher , N Johnson , I dos Santos Silva , J Peto , C Turnbull , S Hines , A Renwick , N Rahman , B. G Nordestgaard , S. E Bojesen , H Flyger , D Kang , K. Y Yoo , D. Y Noh , A Mannermaa , V Kataja , V. M Kosma , M Garcia Closas , S Chanock , J Lissowska , L. A Brinton , J Chang Claude , S Wang Gohrke , C. Y Shen , H. C Wang , J. C Yu , S. T Chen , M Bermisheva , T Nikolaeva , E Khusnutdinova , M. K Humphreys , J Morrison , R Platte , D. F Easton and on behalf of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium
  Background

A recent genome-wide association study identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 2q35-rs13387042 as a marker of susceptibility to estrogen receptor (ER)–positive breast cancer. We attempted to confirm this association using the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

Methods

2q35-rs13387042 SNP was genotyped for 31 510 women with invasive breast cancer, 1101 women with ductal carcinoma in situ, and 35 969 female control subjects from 25 studies. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated by logistic regression, adjusted for study. Heterogeneity in odds ratios by each of age, ethnicity, and study was assessed by fitting interaction terms. Heterogeneity by each of invasiveness, family history, bilaterality, and hormone receptor status was assessed by subclassifying case patients and applying polytomous logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

We found strong evidence of association between rs13387042 and breast cancer in white women of European origin (per-allele OR = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09 to 1.15; Ptrend = 1.0 x 10–19). The odds ratio was lower than that previously reported (P = .02) and did not vary by age or ethnicity (all P ≥ .2). However, it was higher when the analysis was restricted to case patients who were selected for a strong family history (P = .02). An association was observed for both ER-positive (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.17; P = 10–15) and ER-negative disease (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.15; P = .0003) and both progesterone receptor (PR)–positive (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.19; P = 5 x 10–14) and PR-negative disease (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.15; P = .00002).

Conclusion

The rs13387042 is associated with both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer in European women.

 
 
 
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