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Articles by Israel Zewide
Total Records ( 2 ) for Israel Zewide
  Israel Zewide , Ali Mohammed and Solomon Tulu Tadesse
  Background: Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) was introduced to Ethiopia in 1858 and 70% of Ethiopian land, mainly in the highland is suitable for potato growing. Despite this the national average yield is only 8.2 t ha–1. Low soil fertility especially N and P deficiency is the major constraint limiting potato yield in Ethiopia in general and Southwestern part in particular. Concomitantly, there is insufficient site specific information on how much fertilizer to apply on different soil types with patch of high and low fertility. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine area specific N and P rates for optimum potato growth, quality tuber production and improved N and P content of the soils of the study area. Materials and Methods: Four rates of N at 0, 55, 110 and 165 kg ha–1 and P at 0, 20, 40 and 60 kg ha–1 combined in factorial arrangement and laid out in RCBD with three replications. Data collected on potato growth, tuber quality, TN and available P content of the soil after potato harvest were analyzed using SAS version 9.2. Results: The interaction of 165 kg N ha–1 and 20 kg P ha–1 increased plant height by 51% over the control. Besides, 165 kg N ha–1 increased TN contents of the soil by 95% and available P by 42%. Plant height was positively and significantly correlated with soil TN (r = 0.55) and available P content (r = 0.68). Similarly, tuber dry matter content was positively and significantly correlated with tuber specific gravity (r = 0.94) verifying tuber dry matter is an indicator of tuber specific gravity. Conclusion: The present results indicated potato growth, tuber quality, TN and available P content of the soil were affected by N and P rates. The lower and medium N and P rates were favoring potato tuber quality parameters while, the higher N and P rates were favoring potato growth, TN and available P content of the soil. Therefore, the combined application of 165 kg N and 60 kg P ha–1 is required for optimum growth of Jalene potato variety and improved TN and available P content of the soils of Masha district.
  Israel Zewide , Ali Mohammed and Solomon Tulu
  An experiment was conducted at Masha District, Southwestern Ethiopia to investigate the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus rates on yield and yield components of potato. Four rates of nitrogen (0, 55, 110, 165 kg ha-1) and four rates of phosphorus (0, 20, 40, 60 kg ha-1) were combined in 4x4 factorial arrangement in randomized complete block design with three replications. Data collected on growth and yield parameters were analyzed using SAS 9.2 computer software. Application of 165 kg N ha-1 significantly increased days to flowering by 6 days, days to physiological maturity by 13 days, above ground biomass by 36%, underground biomass by 29.79%, total tuber yield by 60.33%, marketable tuber number by 56.36% and total tuber number by 31.7% and average tuber weight by 22.43%. However, N did not influence days to emergency, unmarketable tuber yield and unmarketable tuber number. Application of P significantly increased days to flowering by 3 days, above ground and underground biomass by 8.78% and 61.4% respectively and marketable tuber number by 19.72%. The interaction effect of 165 kg of N and 60 kg P increased marketable tuber yield (36 t ha-1) by 122% as compared to control (16.2 t ha-1). The result of this study verified that yield and yield components of potato are influenced by nitrogen and phosphorus rates. From this study, it can be concluded that the higher rates of nitrogen (165 kg ha-1) and phosphorus (60 kg ha-1) can be used for optimum production of potato variety Jalene in the study area Masha, Southwestern Ethiopia.
 
 
 
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