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Articles by Ibtisam E.M. El Zubeir
Total Records ( 5 ) for Ibtisam E.M. El Zubeir
  Ibtisam E.M. El Zubeir , Voughon Gabriechise and Q. Johnson
  During the present study raw and pastuerized milk samples were collected from the three major dairy factories during March- August 2001. The raw milk supplied by farmers to the selected factory was collected from bulk tank. Similarly pasteurized milk samples, processed and distributed by those factories, were randomly collected from three different food stores and retailers of the Western Cape of South Africa. The frequency of the isolation of the microorganisms, from both raw and pasteurized milk, revealed a higher prevalence of S. aureus in the raw milk (15.38%) followed by those of E. coli (14.3%) that was also isolated at a rate of 3.6% form pasteurized milk. Also, other mastitis-isolated pathogens found were Streptococcus agalactiae (8.79%), Streptococcus dysglactiae (12.09%), Streptococcus uberis (6.72%), Enterococcus faecalis (8.35%) which was also found in 2.2% of the pasteurized milk samples and Staphylococcus epidermidis (8.79%) that were also found in pasteurized milk (2.2%). Other identified isolates, were also represented. However, all samples revealed negative results for the growth of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Descriptive and frequency analysis showed higher means, standard error of means and standard deviation for the somatic cell counts, total bacterial counts, coliform counts and E. coli counts, although their minimum values revealed a negative or a very low levels. A lower level was also obtained for the chemical content (fat, protein, lactose, SNF and total solids) of the pasteurized milk compared to the raw milk samples for all studied companies. Also the percentage of the added water was very high in the processed milk compared to the samples from herd raw bulk milk. Moreover the significant variation between the measurements were estimated.
  J.M. El Bakri and Ibtisam E.M. El Zubeir
  This study was conducted to evaluate the quality of yoghurt supplied to consumers from retail outlets in Khartoum State. Yoghurt samples (144 samples), which represent three different manufacturers (A, B and C) beside traditional producers (T) were collected. The samples included 96 plain yoghurt samples and 48 fruit yoghurt samples. All yoghurt samples were analyzed for chemical parameters (total solids, SNF, fat, protein, ash %, titratable acidity and pH) and the microbiological tests (total bacterial count, coliform count and the yeast and molds count). The means for total solids %, solids non-fat (SNF), fat, protein, ash % and pH for the plain yoghurt samples were 14.04 ± 1.83, 10.86 ± 1.53, 3.18 ± 1.01, 3.44 ± 0.58, 0.678 ± 0.146 and 4.62 ± 0.10, respectively. Whereas for the fruit yoghurt samples the means were 21.70 ± 1.34, 19.70 ± 1.27, 2.00 ± 0.62, 3.90 ± 0.50, 0.661 ± 0.087 and 4.68 ± 0.12, respectively. The means of microbiological measurements for the plain yoghurt samples were log 9.10 ± 9.86, log 4.03 ± 4.41 and log 4.09 ± 4.57 for the total bacterial count, coliform count and yeast and molds count, respectively. Whereas in the fruit yoghurt samples the means were log 8.63 ± 9.99, log 3.59 ± 4.15 and log 3.15 ± 3.64, respectively. Results obtained revealed significant variations (p ≤ 0.001) between samples obtained from different manufacturers in their chemical composition. One hundred and thirty eight of collected samples (96.5%) were found satisfying the international standard for solids non-fat content, however, 73 yoghurt samples (50.7%) were found to have a lower fat content than the standard. In the microbiological parameters tested, the total bacterial count and yeast and molds count were not significantly different between different manufacturers. The coliform count of samples varied significantly (p ≤ 0.001) between manufacturers and with a significance higher (p ≤ 0.05) coliform count in samples collected from traditional manufacturers than that collected from modern manufacturers.
  Fardous M. Bellow , Sanaa O. Yagoub and Ibtisam E.M. El Zubeir
  In the present study the effect and survival of Bacillus spp. (Bacillus subtilis and B. cereus) in milk samples that were collected from Khartoum, Khartoum North and Omduraman were studied. In order to evaluate the degree of spoilage by those organisms, sterile milk sample were inoculated by 3.1x103 cfu mL-1 of B. cereus and 3.5x103 cfu mL-1 B. subtilis and stored at 7, 12, 21, 37 and 45°C. The milk samples were investigated daily for total bacterial counts, fat %, protein % and acidity. The present results revealed that Bacillus spp. inoculated in milk samples showed significant differences for protein, fat, acidity and bacterial count (p<0.05) at different storage periods and temperatures. Moreover the milk samples showed a shelf life of more than 5 days at 7 and 12°C. However, the milk samples that stored at 21, 37 and 45°C recorded a shelf life of 1-4 days.
  Ibtisam E.M. El Zubeir and Mahboba I.A. Ahmed
  This study evaluate the quality of raw milk produced by the big 60 dairy farms at different locations in Khartoum State, 120 milk samples were collected from the selected dairy farms and tested during summer and winter seasons. Laboratory pasteurization counts, coliforms counts, Enterobacteriaceae counts and total bacterial counts of raw milk were estimated. Enumeration, isolation and identification of S. aureus, E. coli and Salmonella spp. were also estimated. Higher total bacterial counts were estimated during the present study for both milk samples collected during summer and winter season (5.3x1010 and 7.5x107 cfu mL-1, respectively). Similarly the laboratory pasteurization count of milk samples collected during summer were higher than those collected during winter season (6.0x103-3.1x109 and zero to 5.3x107 cfu mL-1, respectively). Highly significant variations (p<0.001) were reported for the milk samples collected from dairy farms in different season and cities of Khartoum State for all microbiological quality tests that carried out.
  M.S.A. Nour El Diam and Ibtisam E.M. El Zubeir
  The processed cheese used during the present study was made from white Sudanese cheese with different ripening time (15 and 30 days) from milk with different fat present (2.2 and 4.4%). At time of processing the processed cheese was packed into two types of packaging (glass and plastic) and stored at 4°C for 3 months. The different fat level of milk showed significant differences (p<0.05) on total bacterial counts and coliform count. However the psychrophilic counts and yeast and molds counts showed non significant differences (p>0.05) with the different fat percent of the milk from which the processed cheese was made. The psychrophilic counts, total bacterial counts, coliform counts and yeast and molds counts showed significant differences (p<0.05) with different ripening time (15 and 30 days). Also the storage periods showed significant differences (p<0.05) with psychrophilic counts, total bacterial counts, coliform counts and yeast and molds counts. Similarly the different types of packaging (plastic and glass) showed significant differences (p<0.05) with psychrophilic counts, coliform counts and yeast and molds counts. However total bacterial counts showed non significant differences (p<0.05) with the different types of packaging of the processed cheese. Hence, the present study concluded that if the Sudanese white cheese could be further reprocessed the hygienic quality and the shelf life would improve.
 
 
 
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