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Articles by I.A. Adeyinka
Total Records ( 15 ) for I.A. Adeyinka
  F.O. Abeke , S.O. Ogundipe , A.A. Sekoni , I.A. Adeyinka , O.O. Oni , A. Abeke and I.I. Dafwang
  A study was conducted to determine the response of broiler starter and finisher chicks to dietary levels of Lablab purpureus beans processed by boiling in water for 30 min at 100 °C. For both the starter and the finisher phases, seven isonitrogenous diets containing 23.78% crude protein for the starter and 20.91% crude protein for the finisher were formulated to contain lablab seed meal at 0.0, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 30.0% levels respectively. Diet 1, in each phase had no lablab and served as the control. Each dietary treatment for the starter and the finisher phases was replicated three times in a completely randomized design. There were 25 birds per replicate. Feed and water were given ad libitum. The experiment lasted from 0 to 4 weeks for the starter phase and from 5 to 8 weeks for the finisher phase. Results obtained for the starter phase shows significant (p<0.05) depression in final weight, weight gain, feed intake, feed efficiency and feed-gain ratio. These parameters decreased as the level of lablab seeds in the diets increased. However, feed cost (/kg feed and /bird) were significantly (p<0.05) reduced as the level of lablab seed meal increased in the starter diets. The results obtained for the finisher phase also showed a similar trend. While there were significant (p<0.05) decreases in final weight, weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency as the level of lablab seed meal increased in the diets, feed cost (/kg feed and /bird) were significantly (p<0.05) lowered. Parameters measured for carcass analysis such as live weight and weights of the breast, thigh, wing, neck, legs and head showed a significant (p<0.05) decrease as the dietary levels of lablab seed meal increased. The PCV, Hb and the TP status of the blood indicated significant (p<0.05) decreases as the levels of lablab in the diets increased. However, Lablab purpureus beans can be included up to 5% level in broiler starter and up to 10% level in broiler finisher diets without any adverse effect on the performance of the birds.
  F.O. Abeke , S.O. Ogundipe , A.A. Sekoni , I.I. Dafwang , I.A. Adeyinka , O.O. Oni and A. Abeke
  This study was conducted to determine the response of laying hens to graded dietary levels of cooked Lablab purpureus beans. Six isonitrogenous diets with similar calorie levels were formulated to contain lablab seed meal at 0.0, 7.5, 15.0, 22.5, 30.0 and 37.5%, respectively. Diet 1, which contained no lablab, served as the control diet. It was a normal groundnut cake-maize based layers ration. Each treatment was replicated three times in a completely randomized design. There were 25 laying hens per replicate. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. The birds were managed under the deep litter system. The experiment lasted for 6 months. There was a significant (p>0.05) decrease in final weight, percent change in body weight, feed intake (g bird-1 day-1), feed efficiency, percent hen-day and hen-housed egg production, percent production at peak, average egg weight (g) and income above feed expenses (x) as the level of lablab beans in the diets increased but feed cost (x/12 eggs), age at 25, 50 and at peak egg production (days) and the Roche Yolk Colour Fan (RYCF) score increased significantly (p<0.05) as dietary level of lablab seeds increased. It was concluded that lablab seed meal can be fed up to 7.5% dietary level in layers ration without any significant (p>0.05) adverse effect on percent hen-day and hen-housed egg production.
  G.S. Bawa , S.O. Ajide , I.A. Adeyinka and M.K. Ajala
  A study using 72 weaner rabbits, with an average initial weight of 276±2.16 g was conducted to determine the effects of varying levels of groundnut haulms (GNH) and cowpea shells (CPS) on their performance and nutrient utilization. The rabbits were assigned to 6 dietary treatments based on their initial live weights. There were 12 individually caged animals per treatment. The diets designated as diets 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 contained 20% GNH + 0% CPS; 15% GNH + 15 CPS; 5% GNH + 15% CP and 0% GNH + 20% CPS, respectively. Diet 1 without groundnut haulms (GNH) and cowpea shell (CPS) served as the control. Water and feed were provided ad libitum. At the end of the 56 day feeding period, faeces were collected for 7 days for digestibility trial. The results showed that there were significant differences (p<0.05) in final live weight, feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, cost per kg gain and carcass characteristics across dietary treatments. Nutrients digestibilities were significantly (p<0.05) affected by treatments with diet 2 having the highest nutrients digestibilities and diet 6, the lowest. Based on the overall performance of the animals, the diet containing 20% GNH + 0% CPS is recommended for optimum performance of weaner rabbits. However, it was concluded that where both GNH and CPS are in abundance, especially at harvesting period, a combination of 15% GNH + 5% CPS (diet 3) and or 10% GNH + 10 CPS (diet 4) could be recommended for weaner rabbits.
  I.A. Adeyinka , J.T. Amodu , M.S. Kallah , C.A.M. Lakpini and J.P. Alawa
  A study was conducted with the field grown Pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum) and Lablab purpureus. The aim of the trial was to study the effect of the addition of Lablab legume in varying amount or the composition of daily intake and utilization of millet-silage by Yankasa sheep. Both crops were harvested separately, wilted, chopped and then mixed in four proportions (0:100, 15:85, 30:70 and 50:50% of lablab: millet, respectively) and ensiled. Silage treatments were found to be similar in concentrations of Dry Matter (DM), Organic Matter (OM) and Ether Extract (EE), while incorporation of lablab led to a small increase in Crude Protein (CP), Crude Fibre (CF) and Nitrogen Free Extract (NFE). All millet-lablab mixtures were adequately fermented with favourable aroma and colour. Comparisons of the four silage treatments revealed that, silage with 50:50 millet-lablab proportion was the most readily consumed by the rams with a mean intake of 48.4 g kg-1 W0.75 and lowest intake of 22.5 g kg-1 W0.75 for treatment with 0:100 lablab-millet proportion. Digestion coefficients declined steadily from the control (0:100% lablab-millet mixture) to 50% level legume incorporation. This investigation showed that the best performance of Yankasa rams on the basis of intake and digestibility was obtained from treatment with 50:50, lablab-millet mixtures.
  F.O. Abeke , S.O. Ogundipe , A.A. Sekoni , I.A. Adeyinka , O.O. Oni , A. Abeke and I.I. Dafwang
  This study was conducted to determine the effect of duration of cooking of Lablab purpureus beans on the performance, carcass characteristics and haematological profile of broiler finishers from 4-8 weeks of age. Seven isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were formulated to contain 50% of Lablab beans boiled at 100OC for 0.0, 10.0, 20.0, 30.0, 40.0, 50.0 and 60.0 min, respectively together with a control diet which was a conventional groundnut cake-maize based broiler finisher diet. This amounted to a total of eight dietary treatments. Each treatment was replicated three times, in a complete randomized design. There were 25 broiler chicks (4 weeks old) per replicate. Feed and water were given ad libitum. The experiment lasted for four weeks. Results obtained show that increasing the duration of cooking of lablab seeds up to 30 min had significant (p<0.05) positive effect on final weight, weight gain, feed intake, feed efficiency and mortality rate. The performance of the birds became better as the duration of cooking increased up to 30 min. Beyond that, performance began to decline as the cooking time increased beyond 30 min. It was observed that birds fed the control diet performed significantly (p<0.05) better than all the lablab based diets.
  O.S. Lamidi , I.A. Adeyinka , C.B.I. Alawa , P.P. Barje and R. Ali-Balogun
  A survey study was conducted to monitor the available dry season feed resource options for small holder fatteners in Katsina, Kano and Kaduna states of Nigeria, area partly covering the ecological zones of the Semi-arid, Sudan and Northern Guinea Savannas. The study covered 80 small scale farmers. Structured questionnaire were used to collect information and feed were sampled for laboratory analysis. Cereal crop residue such as maize, sorghum and millet stover and unimproved grass hay were the major basal feedstuffs offered for fattening while sugar cane leaves and tops were predominantly used in the flood plain (fadama) areas. Maize offal and threshed sorghum panicle constitute the main high energy sources used in the dry season fattening schemes. Groundnut, cowpea, soybean haulms and whole cotton seed and to a little extend cotton seed cake were the protein supplements of choice. Combinations of the available crop residue of low nutritive value with the protein and energy supplements ensured moderate levels of weight gain (338.75-360.21 g day-1) and body condition score (4-5) of fattened bulls within two and half months. The result shows that conventional feedstuffs such as cotton seed cake, other oil seed cake and whole Maize are of limited relevance under smallholder fattener conditions. The study underscores the need to develop appropriate supplementation package relevant to each ecological zone. This should emphasize the optimal use of the available non-conventional feed resources at the farmers level in order to guarantee greater productivity and sustainability of the small holder fattening scheme in the increasingly resource limited environment of Northern Nigeria.
  M. Orunmuyi , O.O. Oni , I.A. Adeyinka and O.E. Asiribo
  A study was conducted to determine the relationship between Plasma Alkaline Phosphatase (PAP) activity and reproductive traits in two strains of Rhode Island chickens. Mean enzyme activity in the cocks was 133.07 I.U for strain A and 134.78 I.U for strain B. Values of percentage fertile (PCF), percentage hatch (PCH) and percentage hatchability (PCHBLT) were 80.47, 45.68 and 53.41 in strain A, corresponding values in strain B were 85.94, 51.79 and 56.67. Heritability estimate was high for PAP in both strains (0.57) but low to moderate values were obtained for reproductive traits except percent fertility in strain A (0.56). Genetic correlations between PAP and PCF, PCH and PCHBLT were high and negative in strain A but low and positive values except PCHBLT were obtained in strain B. Phenotypic correlations between PAP and PCF, PCH and PCHBLT were generally low in magnitude but follow the direction of genetic correlations. The enzyme activity can be useful in the selection of the cocks for improved fertility and or hatchability of fertile eggs.
  F.O. Abeke , S.O. Ogundipe , A.A. Sekoni , I.I. Dafwang , I.A. Adeyinka , O.O. Oni , B.I. Nwagu and A. Abeke
  This study was conducted to determine the response of Shika Brown cockerels to graded levels of Lablab purpureus beans, processed by boiling in water for 30 min at 100°C. Six isonitrogenous diets with similar caloric levels were formulated to contain lablab seed meal at 0.0, 7.5, 15.0, 22.5, 30.0 and 37.5%, respectively. Diet 1, which had no lablab seeds and served, as the control, was a groundnut cake-maize based chick diet. Each diet served as a treatment and each treatment was replicated three times in a completely randomized design. There were 30 birds per replicate making a total of 540 birds for the study. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. The experiment lasted 8 weeks. The results obtained showed significant (p<0.05) negative responses of the cockerels to dietary levels of lablab. It was observed that there was a significant (p<0.05) decrease in final weight and weight gain as the level of lablab in the diet increased. Feed efficiency was observed to decrease significantly (p>0.05) as the level of lablab in the diet increased. Mortality was not however significantly (p>0.05) affected by feeding lablab in the diet of the cockerels. Feed cost (/bird) and total cost (/bird) were significantly reduced (p<0.05) as the dietary levels of lablab seed increased. Also organ weights and haematological parameters were not significantly (p>0.05) affected by feeding graded dietary levels of cooked Lablab purpureus beans in the diets of Shika brown cockerels.
  G.N. Akpa , J. Kaye , I.A. Adeyinka and M. Kabir
  Repeatability at 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28-weeks of age of egg weight, egg length, yolk weight, albumen weight, shell thickness, shell membrane thickness, albumen index, yolk index, egg index and shape index was estimated based on the first three eggs laid in the week by forty-eight Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) pullets. The estimated repeatability for these traits was high (0.58 - 0.99) with a consistent increase in repeatability as laying age progressed. Repeatability of egg length, egg index and shape index showed a linear relationship with age, where as the remaining traits showed a curvilinear relationship. The general increase in repeatability of each trait with age indicates that fewer records would be required to adequately characterize the inherent producing ability of each quail hen for the trait as laying age progressed. Maximum repeatability estimates were observed at 28 weeks of age.
  O.M. Momoh , C.C. Nwosu and I.A. Adeyinka
  The Nigerian local chickens were grouped on the basis of body size and body weight into Heavy Ecotype (HE) and Light Ecotype (LE). Comparative evaluation of growth traits; Body Weight (BWT), Body Weight Gain (BWG) and Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) at 4-weekly intervals (from 0-20 weeks) of HE, LE and their F1 crosses; HE x LE - Main Cross (MCX) and LE x HE - Reciprocal Cross (RCX) were carried out. The total of 214, 142, 190 and 185 day-old chicks of HE, LE, MCX and RCX, respectively were used for the study. The chicks in all the genetic groups were raised on deep litter pens from 0-20 weeks using standard management procedures. Data were subjected to analysis of variance. Results showed that the HE differed (p<0.05) from the LE in BWT (0-20 weeks). Crossing the HE with LE appeared to have closed the gap between HE and LE in BWT as there were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the BWT of HE and the crossbred groups as from 8-20 weeks of age. The crossbred groups quickly overcame the initial set backs resulting from maternal/sire-dam interaction effects and grew significantly heavier than the straight bred heavy and light ecotypes during the period, 12-20 weeks of age. FCR showed highly significant (p<0.001) difference among the genetic groups which indicates differences in maintenance requirements. On the whole, results of FCR showed that the local chickens are less efficient in feed utilization.
  I.A. Adeyinka , C.L. Akanwa , G.T. Iyeghe-Erakpotobor , F.D. Adeyinka and M. Orunmuyi
  Data were collected on rabbits kept at the National Animal Production Research Institute Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. The data were collected over 7 year period. The trait studied included average Litter Size at birth (LS), Average Birth Weight (ABWT), Average Weaning Weight (AWWT) and Gestation Length (GL). ABWT ranged from 46.67±4.05 to 52.84±2.94 in the late dry and early wet season, respectively. Average weaning weight and litter size were highest for rabbit born during the early rain period with a value of 12407plusmn;78 g and 5.18 kits, respectively. The highest average birth weight was recorded for kits born during the 3rd parity with a value of 51.4±3.65 g. The average weaning weight also follow a similar trend. Litter size was however highest for kits belonging to parity 4. AWWT and LS were significantly correlated with ABWT with a value of 0.22 and -0.43, respectively. The correlation coefficient of AWWT with LS and Parity were -0.14 and 0.32, respectively. All other correlations were small and non-significant.
  I.A. Adeyinka , O.O. Oni , A. Abeke , I.I. Dafwang , A.A Sekoni , S.O. Ogundipe and F.O. Abeke
  Abstract: The lablab seeds were cooked for 30 min, sundried for three days and thereafter milled and incorporated into chickens’ diets. Six treatments, comprising of six dietary levels of lablab at 0.0, 7.5, 15.0, 22.5, 30.0 and 37.5%, respectively was fed during the grower’ s phase. Results obtained for the growers phase indicate that final weight (g/bird), weight gain (g/bird) and feed cost (N kg- 1) decreased significantly (p<0.05) as the level of lablab increased in the diet. Feed intake (g/bird and g/bird/day) as well as feed cost (N/bird) and total cost (N/bird) also decreased significantly (p<0.05) as the level of lablab increased in the diet up to 22.5% inclusion level before increasing as the level of lablab in the diets continued to increase. The level of lablab in the diet had no effect on mortality throughout the experimental period. In addition haematological parameters such as Packed Cell Volume (PCV), Haemoglobin (Hb) and Total Protein (TP) were not significantly (p<0.05) affected by feeding diets containing graded levels of cooked lablab beans to pullets. Results obtained during the laying phase indicates that feeding lablab seed meal up to 22.5% in the diets at the growers stage had no significant adverse effect (p<0.05) on final weight, feed intake, feed efficiency, percent henday and henhoused egg production, percent production at peak, kilogramme feed per twelve eggs, feed cost per twelve eggs, Haugh Unit and yolk index. However, age of birds at first egg, age at 50% production and age at peak egg production were increased significantly (p>0.05) with increase in the level of lablab seed meal in the growers diets.
  J.T. Amodu , O.S. Onifade , I.A. Adeyinka , J.O. Jegede and S.B. Afolayan
  Legume tree crops, which establish easily and do not require extensive agronomic inputs, constitute potentially valuable sources of supplementary feeds that subsistence and medium-scale livestock farmers in the tropics could use to improve livestock nutrition and productivity. A field trial was conducted with Gliricidia sepium cuttings to investigate the effect if three stock lengths (20, 30 and 40 cm), two stock diameters (1.5-2.5) and (3.0-3.5 cm) and three planting angles (30° , 60° and 90°) in a factorial experiment. There were high significant differences (p<0.05) in all the growth parameters of the stock diameters and stock lengths used. The highest dry matter yield of 3.83, 4.61 and 4.65 t ha-1 were produced by stock length 20, 30 and 40 cm, respectively. The highest planting angle of 90° produced the tallest shoot height and biggest basal diameter, while the least planting angle of 30° produced the least shoot height and basal diameter, respectively. The interactions between the smaller stock diameter and the least planting angle (30° ) produced the least values of growth parameters. Gliricidia cuttings could be easily established with thicker stock diameter of not less than 3.0 and 40 cm stock length, planting in an angle between 60 and 90 degrees.
  F.D. Adeyinka , L.O. Eduvie , I.A. Adeyinka , G.E. Jokthan and M. Orunmuyi
  The effect of progesterone (P4) on egg production was investigated using twenty female guinea fowls raised on deep litter. The birds were given feed and water ad-libitum. They were routinely bled by wing jab between the hours of 9.00 and 10.00 am twice a month for P4 determination. Sera harvested from the samples were stored at -20°C until assayed for P4 by Radio-Immuno-Assay method (RIA). Egg production had a very high (p<0.001) and positive correlation with progesterone level. A high value of coefficient of determination (R2 value) was observed, which implies that there is a high accuracy of prediction of egg production from progesterone level.
  M. Kabir , O.O. Oni , G.N. Akpa , I.A. Adeyinka and P.I. Rekwot
  Fifty Rhode Island chickens were randomly assigned to five treatments with ten cocks in each treatment. Group I cocks (full fed control) received 140 g of a 16% CP growers ration per cock per day. Cocks in Group II, III, IV and V received 98, 70, 42 and 28 g of the same ration per cock per day, representing 70, 50, 30 and 20% of Group I intake, respectively. The feeding trials lasted for 8 weeks during which one ejaculate per day was collected from each cock using the massage technique. The ejaculated semen samples were subjected to both physical and biochemical evaluations. Results showed that cocks that were severely underfed (i.e., Groups IV and V) took significantly longer time (p<0.01) to ejaculate. In addition, ejaculation failures were encountered more frequently with the severely underfed cocks than in cocks that were moderately underfed (i.e., Groups II and III). There were however, no significant differences in most of the biochemical parameters between cocks I all the treatment groups. Ejaculate volume, progressive sperm motility and sperm concentration were significantly depressed (p<0.01) in the severely underfed cocks than in the moderately underfed cocks. Thus, this study revealed that providing Rhode Island red and white cocks with one-half to three-quarter (i.e., 50-70%) of their normal daily ration would neither undermine their semen producing ability nor affect their semen quality adversely.
 
 
 
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