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Articles by I. Y Yoon
Total Records ( 2 ) for I. Y Yoon
  C. H Lee , J. H Mo , I. J Choi , H. J Lee , B. S Seo , D. Y Kim , P. Y Yun , I. Y Yoon , H Won Lee and J. W. Kim
 

Objectives  To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy of the mandibular advancement device (MAD) in Korean patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in terms of severity and to evaluate prognostic factors deciding the success of MAD application.

Design  Retrospective analysis.

Setting  Academic tertiary referral center.

Patients  Of 142 patients who underwent MAD application for OSA management, 50 (46 men and 4 women; mean [SD] age, 50.2 [9.8] years) were included from March 2005 through August 2007.

Intervention  Full-overnight polysomnography was performed before and at least 3 months after intraoral MAD application in 50 patients. Questionnaires for sleep quality, Epworth sleepiness scale, and cephalometry were also studied.

Main Outcome Measures  Treatment results were evaluated and prognostic factors deciding success of MAD application were assessed.

Results  The mean (SD) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) decreased significantly (P < .001) from 36.6 (18.9) to 12.3 (11.4). The success rate, defined by an AHI of lower than 20 and a 50% decrease in AHI, were 74% (37 of 50 patients). Even patients who were not categorized into the success group had a decreased AHI. The success rates of patients with mild, moderate, and severe OSA were 43% (3 of 7), 82% (22 of 27), and 75% (12 of 16), respectively, and a higher success rate in patients with severe OSA showed that MAD could be applied even in patients with severe OSA. The duration of apnea and hypopnea, percentage of patients with snoring, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were improved significantly after treatment. Epworth sleepiness scale scores and lowest oxygen saturation did not change significantly. An analysis of prognostic factors did not reveal any significant difference between the success and nonsuccess groups.

Conclusions  The application of MAD significantly improved nocturnal respiratory function and sleep quality in patients with OSA, even in patients with severe OSA. In patients with OSA, MAD can be used as a good alternative treatment modality regardless of severity because it is noninvasive, easy to manufacture, and has good treatment results.

  C. H Lee , J. W Kim , H. J Lee , P. Y Yun , D. Y Kim , B. S Seo , I. Y Yoon and J. H. Mo
 

Objective  To quantitatively evaluate the effects of the mandibular advancement device (MAD) on changes in the upper respiratory tract during sleep using sleep videofluoroscopy (SVF) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Design  Retrospective analysis.

Setting  Academic tertiary referral center.

Patients  Seventy-six patients (68 men and 8 women) who were treated with the MAD for OSA were included from September 1, 2005, through August 31, 2008.

Intervention  All patients underwent nocturnal polysomnography and SVF before and at least 3 months after receipt of the custom-made MAD. Sleep videofluoroscopy was performed before and after sleep induction and was analyzed during 3 states of awakeness, normoxygenation sleep, and desaturation sleep.

Main Outcome Measures  Changes in the length of the soft palate, retropalatal space, retrolingual space, and angle of mouth opening were evaluated during sleep events with or without the MAD.

Results  Without the MAD, the length of the soft palate and the angle of mouth opening increased during sleep events, especially in desaturation sleep, compared with the awake state. The retropalatal space and retrolingual space became much narrower during sleep compared with the awake state. The MAD had marked effects on the length of the soft palate, retropalatal space, retrolingual space, and angle of mouth opening. The retropalatal space and retrolingual space were widened, and the length of the soft palate was decreased. The MAD kept the mouth closed.

Conclusions  Sleep videofluoroscopy showed dynamic upper airway changes in patients with OSA, and the MAD exerted multiple effects on the size and configuration of the airway. Sleep videofluoroscopy demonstrated the mechanism of action of the MAD in patients with OSA. The MAD increased the retropalatal and retrolingual spaces and decreased the length of the soft palate and the angle of mouth opening, resulting in improvement of OSA.

 
 
 
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